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HISTORICAL MANUSCRIPTS COMMISSION. 

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FOURTEENTH REPORT, APPENDIX, PART X. 



THE 

MANUSCRIPTS 



OF THE 



EARL OF DARTMOUTH. 

VOL. II. 
AMERICAN PAPERS. 

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PR °V0, UTAH 



INTRODUCTION. 



Lord Dartmouth's Manuscripts, in so far as they were at the 
time known to exist, were calendared by the Royal Commission 
in their Eleventh Report, 1887, Appendix, Part V. 

Several years after the publication of that Report I had the 
opportunity, through the courtesy of the then Lord Lewisham, 
to examine those original manuscripts for the purpose of making 
such notes and memoranda as I should like to include in my 
own manuscript Catalogue Index of papers relating to America 
from 1763 to 1783 in the public and private archives of England, 
France, Holland, and Spain. 

After the present Earl had succeeded to the title and estates 
several boxes of additional Manuscripts were found. These 
were placed at the disposal of the Royal Historical Commission, 
with the intimation that I might be allowed to consult them for 
my own Catalogue Index as before, and perhaps calendar the 
American portion for the Royal Commission. I had thus the 
honour of sorting this great mass of papers, of separating all 
that related to North America, and of cataloguing them for my 
own use. Many bundles appeared to have never been touched 
since they left the hands of the second Earl of Dartmouth 
and his Secretary in the last century, and some letters, curiously 
enough, had never been opened, the seals still remaining 
intact. 

The Secretary of the Royal Commission on Historical 
Manuscripts having asked me to furnish the Commission with a 
report on these additional American papers my compliance with 
bis request here follows in 544 pages. As my own field of 
research is mostly limited to what is now the United States, I 
requested the assistance of my friend, Mr. Douglas Brymner, 
Archivist, who has devoted himself to forming the official 
collection of Canadian Manuscripts at Ottawa, to report on the 
papers relating to Canada, Nova Scotia, &c. Mr. Brymner's 
work extends from page 545 to 606. The copious Index to the 
whole volume is my own. 

e 82140. Wt. 21255. a 2 



IV 



These additional American papers have been arranged and sub- 
divided into — (i.) Those relating to the original thirteen American 
Colonies and the War of Independence by which these Colonies 
became the United States ; (ii.) Those relating in a more 
limited sense to the West India Islands ; and (Hi.) Those 
referring to the Colonies immediately north of the United 
States, as Canada, Labrador, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and 
St. John's Island. 

The bulk of these Manuscripts come within the term of office 
of the second Earl of Dartmouth as Secretary of State for the 
American Department, though the dates actually range from 
1676 to 1839. It is presumed that the few earlier papers 
are copies used as precedents in his official life ; amongst them, 
however, is an original deed of sale of land by the Stockbridge 
Indians bearing seals and Indian totems. The later documents, 
that is, in the present century, relate to the portrait of 
Lord Dartmouth presented to Dartmouth College in America 
by his grandson. 

The painstaking student of the American phase of English 
history will find it convenient to use the former Report 
of the Royal Commission upon Lord Dartmouth's Manuscripts 
in conjunction with this volume, in order to appreciate the 
very great historical and biographical importance of the entire 
collection. If these Calendars are compared with the Documents' 
relating to the Colonial History of New York, the New Jersey 
Archives, the New Hampshire Records, Forces American 
Archives, and other American and English publications, the 
student will be gratified with the great number and value 
of connecting links, facts, incidents, and explanations here 
disclosed. 

William, second Earl of Dartmouth, grandson of the first Earl, 
was born 20th June 1731. His father died the following year, 
and his mother subsequently (1736) married the Earl of Guilford, 
thus bringing into the same household the young Lord Dart- 
mouth and Frederick (afterwards Lord) North, who was about 
two years older. Lord Dartmouth was educated at Marylebone* 
then at Westminster School, finally at Oxford, whence he and 
Frederick North accomplished the tour of the Continent. He 
had, meanwhile, on the death of his grandfather, 15th December 



1750, succeeded to the earldom. He took lii3 seat in the House 
of Lords 31st May 1754, Mr. North about the same time being 
elected member for Banbury, for which borough he sat continuously 
till called to the House of Lords in December 1790 as Earl of 
Guilford. Lord Dartmouth married in 1755 Frances Catherine, 
daughter of Sir Charles Gunter Nicholl. Though we find him 
acting as Recorder of Sheffield, and occasionally speaking in 
Parliament, a contemporary sketch of his life says that from 
this period to 1765 his attachment to letters and to domestic 
life, together with a pious turn of mind, secluded him from the 
bustle of public affairs. High offices of State, however, had been 
filled by his grandfather, who was in his time Secretary of 
State, Lord Privy Seal, and Lord Justice, by his uncle Heneage, 
Baron of the Exchequer, and by Henry Bilson Legge, Chancellor. 
On the formation of Lord Rockingham's Ministry in 1765, which 
Mr. Lecky alludes to as a " Ministry of great families but of 
" young men, inexperienced, with two or three worn-out 
" veterans," and Lord Chesterfield as an " arch without its 
keystone " (Pitt), Lord Dartmouth, then thirty -four years old, 
was urged by the Duke of Newcastle to take office, and, like 
Grafton and Rockingham, get the better of his own inclination 
for the sake of the King and the public (see previous 
Calendar of Lord Dartmouth's Manuscripts, 11th Report, 
Appendix, Part V., p. 331). Lord Shelburne having been 
offered in the new Ministry his old place at the head of the 
Board of Trade, and, declining it in a pompous letter (Walpole), 
the post was conferred on Lord Dartmouth. He was at the 
same time sworn one of the Lords of Privy Council. The 
historian Bancroft, who seems to favour Shelburne, says, "the 
" refusal of Shelburne to act under Rockingham as President of 
" the Board of Trade left this important office to the young and 
" inexperienced Lord Dartmouth." 

The new Ministry opened its career with meetings and 
measures to carry out in the fullest degree the Stamp Act 
passed in the previous February, but the utter opposition and 
resentment of the Colonies soon led to its abandonment and 
repeal (pp. 15-46). The feeling of the American provinces 
against the Act is here embodied in the formal resolutions of the 
^Chambers of Virginia, Rhode Island, New York, Massachusetts, 



VI 



and New Jersey, and by those drawn up at town and county 
meetings. Their agents in London, notably Franklin for 
Pennsylvania, Dennys de Berdt for Massachusetts, Charles 
Garth for South Carolina, and others, forcibly represented the 
opinion of their constituents. General Phineas Lyman con- 
tributes long arguments against it, and the merchants of London 
and Birmingham petition for its repeal. 

A letter from Dr. Fothergill, the well-known physician, is 
curious from its suggestion at this early date (29th August 
1765) of Commissioners being chosen to go to America to 
confer with others appointed there on the subject of their 
complaints, intimating that such a conference would give a 
correct knowledge of the Americans and " avert the independence 
they seem to desire " (p. 18). 

Though Lord Dartmouth in the month of January 1766 
moved the Lords' reply to the King, vaguely pledging their 
utmost endeavours to support the King's dignity and the 
legislative authority of the kingdom over its colonies, yet 
almost immediately we find, apparently, his mind made up for 
the repeal of the Act, and the Earl of Huntingdon and the Earl 
of Chesterfield offering him their proxies in most impressive 
terms for that purpose (pp. 33, 36). 

In the month of February 1766 Lord Rockingham seems to 
have been so thoroughly disturbed by the conduct of the Court 
party as to threaten an immediate resignation, and it now 
became Lord Dartmouth's turn to urge the claims of country 
against personal inclination. The letter is found in the Memoirs 
of Rockingham. 

" The case is not yet desperate, and while there is the least shadow of 
hope of doing good, I would on no account give up the game to those who 
will, undoubtedly, do mischief. The Act once repealed, I shall heartily 
congratulate your Lordship upon a release from your fatigue. Your 
successors may then be left to enjoy the sweets of an honourable coalition 
and hug themselves in the possession of employment, which nothing but 
concern for the public good could make it worth your while to hold. It 
will be some time before they can contrive to get us into such another 
scrape ; when they do it will be time enough to call upon Yourself & Co 
to deliver us from it." 

The Stamp Act once repealed, the overthrow of the Whigs 
followed, and Lord Dartmouth held no office for some years. 
The letters, however, in these pages show that Lord Rockingham 



Vll 



claims him as one of his party, till in January 1771 Lord 
Dartmouth refers to a " step taken contrary to Lord Rocking- 
ham's opinion " (p. 77), evidently that of his joining the Tory 
party. In 1772, on the resignation of the Secretary of State for 
the American Department, Lord North, now First Lord of the 
Treasury, wrote to Lord Dartmouth asking permission to 
recommend him to the King as successor to the vacant 
department (p. 86). This office of a third Secretary had been 
created in 1768 to relieve the other departments of the great 
and increasing pressure of American affairs, and had from that 
date been filled by Wills, Earl of Hillsborough, who had married 
Lord Dartmouth's aunt, Baroness Stawell, widow of Henry 
Bilson Legge. 

It is stated that Dr. Franklin may have been partly instru- 
mental in bringing about Lord Dartmouth's appointment, for 
when asked by a friend at Court if, should Lord Hillsborough 
be removed, he could name another likely to be more 
acceptable to the Americans, he answered, (i Yes, there is Lord 
" Dartmouth, we liked him very well when he was at the head 
" of the Board formerly, and probably should like him again." 
His appointment was received in America with general joy, the 
greatest hopes being placed in his high character and anticipated 
influence in bringing to some amicable conclusion the disputes 
and prevailing irritation. He was at the same time First Lord 
of Trade, the two offices being united for him. 

That Lord Dartmouth was looked up to by the Americans, 
and his aid sought in order to reconcile differences even before 
he took office as Secretary of State, is shown by the joint letter 
of Bowdoin, Pemberton, and Joseph Warren, three of the 
leading members of the popular party in Massachusetts, written 
from Boston, 23rd March 1770, transmitting, by order of a 
meeting held in Faneuil Hall, a copy of the proceedings relative 
to the massacre of the oth, and expressing the desire of the 
town and province that the troops be removed, for which 
purpose they solicit his Lordship's interposition and influence 
(p. 72). 

It was wittily said at a later date that Mr. Grenville lost 
America because he read the American despatches which his 
predecessors had never done, and it may be imagined that Lord 



Vlll 



Dartmouth's reading was not tranquillizing. He came into 
office at the moment when the Attorney and Solicitor Generals 
were occupied with their reports and opinions on the burning of 
the <e Gaspee," an armed revenue schooner which had become a 
source of friction and very unpopular with the people of Rhode 
Island (p. 86 et seq.), which event the Attorney-General 
describes as (i of rive times the magnitude of the Stamp Act " 
(p. 91). 

Dr. Franklin in his correspondence relates his attending his 
Lordship's first levee, and his gratification at his reception, so 
different from that accorded to him by the previous Secretary. 
Dr. Franklin soon after delivered tcf Lord Dartmouth a petition 
from the Assembly of Massachusetts to the King. On 
Lord Dartmouth intimating that it would but offend His 
Majesty and bring down a reprimand on the Assembly, and that 
he was extremely unwilling that one of the first acts of his 
administration should be of so unpleasant a nature, Franklin 
promised to consult his constituents further, and the matter was 
accordingly postponed. It is curious to note that one of 
the last acts of Lord Dartmouth's administration was also in 
connection with an American petition to the King — the famous 
" Olive Branch," that drawn up by the second Congress of 
the United Colonies (see p. 358). The original, now in the 
Public Record Office, America and West Indies, Vol. 279, 
folio 251, bears only this endorsement, ''Sept. 1st 1775. 
" Delivered to the Earl of Dartmouth by Messrs. Penn and 
" Lee." The first petition of Congress to the King in 1774 had 
also been put into Lord Dartmouth's hands, and, in Dr. Frank- 
lin's words, " he told us it was a decent and proper petition and 
cheerfully undertook to deliver it." (See page 241 and some 
correspondence in the previous Calendar.) The original of that 
petition is also in the Public Record Office, America and West 
Indies, Vol. 278, folio 471, and its duplicate original is considered 
one of the most precious papers among the Franklin Manuscripts 
in the State Department at Washington. Both petitions, with 
notes, are in Stevens's Facsimiles, Nos. 454 and 850. 

Notwithstanding all his good dispositions towards America 
the Minister appears almost helpless in the current of circum- 
stances. It may not be uninteresting to read on this point the 



7X 

opinion of one of the American patriots, Samuel Adams 
(Bancroft iv., 267) : 

" The present administration, even though the very good Lord Dart- 
mouth is one of them, are as fixed as any of their predecessors in their 
resolution to carry their favourite point, an acknowledgement of the right 

of Parliament to make laws binding us in all cases whatever 

His Majesty, in his answer to our late petitions, implies that the 
Parliament is the supreme legislature, and that its authority over the 
Colonies is the constitution. All allow the minister in the American 
department to be a good man. The great men in England have an 
opinion of us as being a mightily religious people, and suppose that we 
shall place an entire confidence in a minister of the same character. In 
fact, how many were filled with the most sanguine expectations when 
they heard that the good Lord Dartmouth was intrusted with a share in 
administration. Yet without a greatness of mind equal, perhaps superior, 
to his goodness, it will be impossible for him singly to stem the torrent 
of corruption. This requires much more fortitude than I yet believe he 
is possessed of. The safety of the Americans depends upon their pursuing 
their wise plan of union in principle and conduct." 

Lord- Dartmouth's well-meaning efforts in opening a private 
correspondence with Mr. Cushing, Speaker of the Massachusetts 
Assembly, was rejoiced at by the extreme faction in America as 
an act ignoring the Governor (pp. 158, 168, 175). The trans- 
mission by Dr. Franklin to Boston of the Hutchinson and 
Whately correspondence had so inflamed the minds of the people 
of that province that they formally demanded the removal of 
Governor Hutchinson and Lieutenant-Governor Oliver, which 
demand in its turn highly incensed the Home Government and 
the King. The attempt to force the East India Company's tea 
on the American Colonies was followed by the refusal to allow 
the ships to land or the destruction of the cargoes. The 
course of events may be easily followed in these pages. There 
are also (pp. 236, 264, &c.) traces of the informal negotiation 
opened with Dr. Franklin, then living in Craven Street, just 
before he started for America, by means of Dr. Fothergill, the 
physician, Mr. David Barclay, merchant, the Hon. Mrs. Howe, 
Lord Howe, and Lord Hyde, which extended over several weeks, 
and of which an interesting account is given by Dr. Franklin in 
his journal. On page 266 is Dr. Fothergill's letter to Lord 
Dartmouth on the subject, and on page 270 the <l Plan for 
a Permanent Union." 

Numerous papers from 1769 to 1773 relate to schemes of fresh 
settlement of American lands towards the west and south, the 



spirit of emigration from Europe being already a fact to be 
noticed (p. 181). Most important, perhaps, is the proposed Ohio 
Settlement — the rock on which Lord Hillsborough split as 
Secretary of the American Department. A proposed colony 
west of the Alleghany Mountains was to be called Pittsylvania 
(p. 75). A notification of the emigration of eighty souls from 
Fort Pitt to Fort Natchez is followed a little later by " Thoughts 
for erecting a new Government" there. Settlements on the 
Mississippi were strongly advocated by General Lyman, as is 
seen also in the American Manuscripts of the Lansdowne House 
Collection. In 1772 he proposes the erection of a " civil govern- 
ment " from the Bay of Mexico to the Ohio, and in this way to 
direct thither the emigration which is taking place from the 
settled lands in Connecticut to the country between Crown 
Point and the Connecticut River (p. 111). Two hundred Scotch 
families beg some encouragement to enable them to settle on 
that continent (p. 96). Lord Dartmouth himself owns 40,000 
acres in East Florida, and William Gerard de Brahm, once 
Surveyor-General of America, tells his Lordship that he can 
find thirteen good French Protestant families to settle on it. 
He appears to be instrumental in forming for the purpose 
a Society called the Swizer or Cape Florida Society for which 
8,000 acres are to be appropriated at a regular quit-rent. 
The terms and conditions, however, after much correspondence 
are finally thrown over by the members as unsuitable for a 
te society of free people," but the real objection seems to have 
been to Mr. de Brahm as agent. Mr. de Brahm's lengthy 
epistles are numerous, he transmits, too, a manuscript history 
of East Florida (p. 120), and various astronomical and religious 
treatises. 

Reference also appears to the disputed grants of land west 
of the Connecticut River and known as the New Hampshire 
grants. William Samuel Johnson, Agent for Connecticut, acted 
in 1767 in London on behalf of the settlers on the disputed lands. 
He subsequently became President of Columbia College, New 
York. A Mr. Hawley was appointed by others, members of the 
Church of England, also to represent their case (p. 105). Paul 
Wentworth, another agent, finding that these settlers had formed 
part of the body of New England troops which had surprised 



XI 

Ticonderoga, denounces and repudiates them in a spirited letter 
(p. 363). 

In the year 1774 are some original rolls of the Royalist 
Militia of different districts of the Province of New York, 
which rolls it is supposed escaped the fire at Fort George where , 
Governor Tryon says, a complete statement of the militia was 
lost (p. 215). 

The correspondence multiplies in the year 1775, the last year 
of Lord Dartmouth's office. Most interesting are many private 
despatches from the governors and others in the different 
American provinces, notably Lord William Campbell of South 
Carolina, Lord Dunmore of Virginia, Martin of North Carolina, 
and Tryon of New York, each with its own tale of the anarchy 
and strife amongst the people, the acts of the provincial assemblies, 
the subversion of the Royal authority, and the final departure of 
the Royal governors. 

Correspondence with Richard Oswald, a Scotch merchant in 
London, and of Achincrue, Ayrshire, who is commended to Lord 
Dartmouth by Mr. Secretary Pownall in a note on a wrapper 
(p. 268). According to Lord Edmond Fitzmaurice's Life of Lord 
Shelbume, Mr. Oswald originally became known to the Government 
as a contractor during the Seven Years War. Mr. Pownall says, 
" Your Lordship's uncle .... I believe, consulted him much in 
matters of commercial policy/' The correspondence thus opened 
with the American Department culminated in 1782 in his 
appointment by Lord Shelburne as agent Plenipotentiary in 
Paris to negotiate the Treaty between England and America. 

The numerous copies of intercepted letters in this year show 
the activity of the Post Office over the American mails. Many 
of them were enclosed within wrappers (see pp. 347, 376, 393), 
which still bear in the King's hand the exact hour and minute 
at which he received them. That the same activity extended 
to the French and Dutch mails in connection with the Home 
and Foreign Departments is shown by Lord Auckland's collection 
of Manuscripts, where, besides the copies of those intercepted, 
are letters in 1777 from Anthony Todd, the Secretary of the 
Post Office, giving glimpses of himself and his confidential 
" young men " engaged twelve hours on a stretch over the 
business. 



Xll 



Lord Dartmouth's important despatches of the 2nd August 1775 
(pp. 344-45), recalling General Gage, " the mild General" as the 
King calls him, and announcing reinforcements in troops, money, 
and supplies, receive added interest by being read with the 
King's letters to Lord North (Donne, Vol. L, Nos. 303-305). 
The employment of Indians is here based on the ground of the 
American people having been the first to enlist them in their 
service. 

Bancroft, in his History, states that in the spring of this year 
the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts had sent messages to 
the Mohawks to persuade them either to take part with the 
Americans " or to stand neuter," and that it had won over the 
converted Indians settled at Stockbridge by presents of blankets 
and ribbon. Also, that on the formation of Washington's camp 
outside Boston, a number of these same Indians were armed with 
bows and arrows as well as guns, visiting that camp with their 
squaws and children. 

On the other hand the Americans grounded their overtures 
towards the Indians on the action of Canadian emissaries who 
were reported to be seeking to influence these nations in favour 
of England. 

The holograph unaddressed letter from Mr. Jefferson, of the 

25th August 1775, was, I find since the entry was printed, 

intended for John Randolph. As joint author in 1774 of the 

Declaration by Congress setting forth the causes or necessity of 

taking up arms, and in the year following as sole author of the 

Declaration of Independence, Mr. Jefferson's words at this date 

are noticeable : — 

" I wish no false sense of honor, no ignorance of our real intentions, no 
vain hope that partial concessions of right will be accepted may induce 
the ministry to trifle with accomodation till it shall be put even out of 
our own power ever to accomodate; if indeed Great Britain ; disjoined 
from her Colonies, be a match for the most potent nations of Europe with 
the colonies thrown into their scale, they may go on securely, but if they 
are not assured of this, it would be certainly unwise, by trying the event 
of another campaign, to risque our accepting a foreign aid which perhaps 
may not be obtainable but on a condition of everlasting avulsion from 
Great Britain." 

On the 9th of November 1775 the Duke of Grafton resigned 

the Privy Seal, disapproving of the measures pursued towards 

America. This led to various changes, Lord George Germain 



Xlll 

taking the American Department. The King seems to have 
had some difficulty in satisfying all parties ; he wishes Lord 
Dartmouth to have the Southern Department, and though his 
affection for him is well known, he petulantly speaks of him as 
" unaccomodating" and "foolishly attached to the office of 
Privy Seal." Lord Dartmouth's own state of mind is well put 
forward in the following letters. 

Mr. Robinson, Secretary to the Treasury and Leader of the 
House, writes from the House of Commons, 8th November, at. 
15 minutes past 4 p.m., that from the situation he perceives Lord 
North's mind is in, and the anxiety he expresses that his Lord- 
ship should agree to accept the seals of one of the old Secretaries 
of State, he hopes he will agree to do so. 

Lord Dartmouth's reply is amongst the Marquis of Aber- 
gavenny's Manuscripts : — 
"Dear Sir, 

" The distress I see Lord North in deprives me not only of the power 
of expressing my thoughts to him, but even of collecting and digesting 
them myself. Be assured that if I take the seals that are offered me, I 
shall render myself ten times more miserable than I am. There is nothing 
I dread more than the appearance of impracticability, but you will allow 
me to say to you, that I think it is reasonable that a noble Yiscount 
[Weymouth] should be expected to accomodate as myself; from what 
you told me to day I cannot but entertain a hope that he may still be 
prevailed upon to do it. I dare not ask Lord North to try, perhaps you 
may have an opportunity to get at those who may effect it, sure it was 
unfortunate that Lord N proposed the option, I think incoherently & 
therefore I must write so : the dread of a situation in wch I foresee na 
satisfaction to myself on one hand, & my love for Lord N. & regard to his 
peace of mind on the other tear me to pieces. I would with all my heart 
go quite out of employment, but that would look unkind to him — if you 
think you see a ray of light for me, let me know, and believe me always; 
your most faithful humble Servant, Dartmouth." 

Mr. Robinson sends another note from the House at 7 p.m. 
" Lord North this moment tells me that he will again apply to 
Ld Wey — th." Both the King and Lord North, however, wish 
his Lordship to accept the seal of Secretary of State 

The next morning Mr. Eobinson writes : — " Lord North after 
" leaving the House last night said he could never think of 
" pressing you to accept an office that would make you miser- 
" able." He is to see Lord Weymouth this morning, and it is 
hoped he will accept, in which case Lord Dartmouth would have 
the Privy Seal that day. 



XIV 

Again at half-past two, Mr. Robinson sends a note that Lord 
Weymouth is to see the King for the purpose of settling, to 
which Lord Dartmouth replies : — 
" Dear Sir, 

" The suspence in which I have been since I received your note, is a 
state of no small Agony — relieve me if you can — sure I must have heard 
before this hour, if the interview had turned out as you expected, and things 
are going on well for 

" Dear Sir, 

" Your most obedient 

" and faithful Servant 
" Thursday Evening £ past 9. D." 

His suspense is shortly relieved by Mr. Robinson's letter (see 

p. 400), written after ten o'clock, stating that Lord Weymouth 
accepted the secretaryship referred to, and that the much desired 
Privy Seal was at Lord Dartmouth's disposal. 

Lord Dartmouth retained the office of Privy Seal till the 
return of the Whigs in March 1782. That he was not quite 
satisfied during that time, may be inferred from a letter written 
to Lord North 13th September 1780, now amongst the Marquis 
of Abergavenny's Manuscripts : — 

" My dear Lord, 

"I have opened my mind more freely to Mr. Eobinson than I could 
have done it to you, if you had had leisure to hear me, he may perhaps 
have repeated to you some part of what I said to him respecting both Lord 
Lewisham and myself; with regard to myself I have only to say that if 
other people are unmindful of me, you are in a situation that gives you 
opportunity to remind them whenever you think fit : as to Lord L .... it 
is employment that I desire for him .... a seat at the board of trade 
would not now, 1 believe, be acceptable to him and .... he would not 
receives my approbation if he should accept of it. You will think perhaps 
that I hold myself pretty high upon this occasion ; it may be so but you 
must pardon my freedom, if I say that neither your plea of old promises, 
nor your impatient and unfriendly manner with me, have convinced me that 
I am wrong ; however, my attachment to you, is formed upon such grounds, 
that no ill-treatment that I may think I receive can ever make me 
cease to wish well to your administration, or to be my dear Lord, your 
affectionate faithful humble Servant. — D." 

It is recorded in one of Mr. Toplady's letters that about 
October 1776 it was iC strongly represented," and believed that 
Lord Dartmouth should have the Lord Lieutenancy of Ireland. 
" If," adds Mr. Toplady, " he should be sent with a land tax 
in his right hand, I shall heartily wish him safe back again." 

Records of the part taken by Lord Dartmouth in Parlia- 
mentary debate are not numerous. Subsequent to the Cyder 



XV 

Bill of 1763 which he attacked, and his condemnation of Breck- 
nock's Droit le Roi, 1764, they relate to American affairs. 

1st Feb. 1775 - Debate in the Lords on the Earl of Chatham's 

Provisional Act for settling the troubles in 
America. 
21st Mar. - Debate on the Bill for restraining the Trade 

and Commerce of the New England 
Colonies. 
17th May - Debate on Lord Camden's Bill to repeal the 

Quebec Government Act. 
26th Oct. - Debate in the Lords on the Address of 

Thanks. (America — " The measures of 
" last Session were directed to the protec- 
te tion of the Province of Massachusetts 
" Bay entirely.") 
1st Nov. - Debate on employing Foreign troops without 

the consent of Parliament. 
8th Nov. - Debate on a Motion " That the Petition of 

" the Congress of America to the King 
" affords ground of conciliation." 
15th Nov. - Debate on the Duke of Grafton's Motion 

respecting the British Forces in America. 
14th Mar. 1776 Debate on the Duke of Grafton's Proposi- 
tion for Conciliation with America. 
7th Dec. 1779 - Debate on the Duke of Richmond's Motion 

for an Economical Reform of the Civil 
List Establishments. The public expendi- 
ture (mostly in connection with the War 
in America) Richmond said was lavish 
and wasteful to a shameful degree. 
In the Coalition Ministry, April to December 1783, Lord 
Dartmouth served as Steward of the Household, and in 1786 he 
Was given by Lord North the High Stewardship of Oxford 
University. 

Both Lord and Lady Dartmouth were strongly attached to 
the evangelical sect organized by the Countess of Huntingdon. 
Lord Dartmouth had been introduced to her by her cousin the 
then Countess of Guilford, third wife of Francis, Lord North, 
Earl of Guilford. Lord Dartmouth so identified himself with 



XVI 



the connection that, as early as 1767, daring a serious illness of 
Lady Huntingdon, he was spoken to concerning the taking over 
of her chapels in the event of any such exigency. His house 
at Sand well, near Birmingham, was the resort of many of the 
preachers, and Lady Dartmouth's drawing-room at Cheltenham 
was opened for religious meetings. In this way he became 
acquainted with Whitefield, who calls him " the Daniel of the 
age," Wesley, Toplady, Hervey, Romaine, Venn, Rector of 
Huddersfield, and other eminent supporters of Calvinistic 
Methodism. In the present Calendar, limited as it is to 
American affairs, many names are recognized as belonging to the 
same circle, notably the rich merchant John Thornton, " who 
" expended an ample fortune in the most splendid charity, and 
" who preceded Simeon in the practice of purchasing advowsons 
" and bestowing them on evangelical preachers " (Lecky III., 
123). Other names are Lord Bath, Rev. Martin Madan 
(pp. 407, 528) of the Lock Chapel, to which Lord Dartmouth 
and Baron Smythe gave the weight of their rank and influence, 
Rev. Mr. Rawlings (p. 472, &c.) formerly a student at Oxford, 
and for forty years Vicar of Padstow, and the Rev. Bryan 
Broughton, Rector of All Hallows, Lombard Street, Secretary 
to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts and one of the original Methodists at Oxford. It was 
Lord Dartmouth who prevailed on the Bishop of Lincoln to 
ordain John Newton, and it is well known that his Lordship is 
alluded to by Cowper in the words u who wears a coronet and 
prays." It was also Lord Dartmouth who accompanied the 
Countess of Huntingdon and the Duchess of Ancaster in her 
audience with their Majesties to remonstrate on the balls and 
routs held by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and to Lord 
Dartmouth the King expressed his agreeable surprise at rinding 
Lady Huntingdon so different from what he had expected. 

The very interesting letters and papers in connection with 
the Indian Charity School in Lebanon, Connecticut, first started 
by the Rev. Eleazer Wheelock, and which afterwards developed 
into Dartmouth College, should not fail to be noticed. The 
entire text of those from Dr. Wheelock has in most cases been 
given, others are from Nathaniel Whitaker, who in 1766 came 
to England with Samson Occom, Dr. Wheelock's first Indian 



XV11 



scholar, to rouse interest and gain subscriptions for extending 
the scheme. I have elsewhere in a footnote (p. 12) directed 
attention to Chase and Lord's history of the College. The 
letter from Dr. Wheelock of 22nd December 1768 transmitting 
specimens of Indian merchandise is by a regrettable misprint on 
page 65 dated from London instead of from Lebanon. In 1767, 
Trustees being nominated, Lord Dartmouth was appointed 
President of the Board, John Thornton, Treasurer, and Robert 
Keen, a woollen-draper in the Minories, Secretary. In 1773, 
Thornton writes (p. 132) of 500?. he is willing to give towards 
the building of the College. In 1776 he begs that the safety of 
the College might be recommended to both General Sir William 
Howe and his brother the Admiral. In 1 826 a question arises 
as to the whereabouts of a full-length portrait of the Earl by 
Copley, supposed to have been in the College but not to be 
found. His grandson kindly supplying another, it is detained 
on its way to its destination by the citizens of New York, and 
at their request placed for the day of the National anniversary, 
the 4th of July, in its case, beside the portraits of Washington, 
Franklin, and other eminent Americans (pp. 489-492). 

Many interesting, if perhaps partisan, letters are from 
Ambrose Serle, who had been in Lord Dartmouth's service 
while Secretary of State, is appointed in January 1776 Clerk 
of Reports, and who accompanies the British Arnry in America 
from 1776 to 1778, in what capacity exactly does not appear, 
but that part of the time in New York he had control of the 
press. While recounting the military or general occurrences he 
writes very freely his own reflections and opinions : — 

" Among the causes of the present Civil War is one which 

may probably hinder more than any, all the Endeavours for Peace and 
Reconciliation .... Religion, added to the very active and unbecoming 
Part the Preachers here of all Denominations have taken in these 
Controversies .... the War is at the Bottom very much a religious 
War, and every one looks to the Establishment of his own Party upon 
the Issue of it." " Among other Engines, which have raised the present 
Commotion next to the indecent Harangues of the Preachers, none has 
had a more extensive or stronger Influence than the Newspapers of the 
respective Colonies. One is astonished to see with what Avidity they 
are sought after and how implicitly they are believed, by the great Bulk 
of the People. The Congress saw the necessity of securing this Advan- 
tage entirely to themselves, and of preventing all Publications, which 
might either expose or refute the Policy of their Measures. A free 
Press, however, teeming with heterogeneous Matters, would at least 
have retarded their great Design Government may find it expedient in 
f 82140. b 



XVI 11 

the Sum of things, to employ this popular .Engine, and if it be impossible 
to restrain the Publication of Falsehood, it will be its Interest to give 
Power and Facility to the Circulation of Truth." 

While he sees all the distress of the people, the want of 

government or misgovernment of the leaders, the poor remnants 

of their army, he yet feels the significance of their Declaration 

of Independence, which the Government persists in ignoring. 

" If it be not too much Presumption to say what has been uniformly 
my own Opinion, the Idea of treating with the Eebel Leaders, after their 
Declaration of Independence, and much more after their refusal to treat 
with us but upon that ground has given us a Wound, wch only the future 
Vigor of our Arms can heal .... unless we beat and beat down too, 
all Men that oppose us with Arms, I believe we have no other human 
means for the Possession of America." 

Once conquered, too, he foresees that future policy must be 
fundamentally adjusted, suggesting an American Constitution, 
co-ordinate with the British, otherwise the country would 
naturally shake off British authority in half a century. He 
recommends Joseph Galloway of Pennsylvania, forwarding some 
of his long and interesting letters to Richard Jackson (solicitor 
to the Board of Trade, King's Counsel, and M.P. for New Romney 
from 1768 to 1784) on the subject of the government of America, 
besides letters on the state of the country as he viewed it. 
Mr. Galloway supplies Lord Dartmouth with a number of 
American statistics (pp. 454-5), and arguments against the 
proposed evacuation of Philadelphia (p. 466). 

Another correspondent and intimate friend is Sir James 
Adolphus Oughton of Caroline Park, near Edinburgh, Com- 
mander-in-Chief of His Majesty's Forces in Scotland. It was 
he who introduced Dr. Beattie, in whose Journal (Forbes' 
Life of Beattie) are many references to Lord Dartmouth's courtesy 
and kindness. Yet another is James Hutton, the Chief of the 
Moravians in London and a well-known figure of the period. 

Lord Dartmouth received, like his successor in the American 
Department, Lord George Germain, various " Opinions of the 
best Measures to be pursued towards America," ''Thoughts on 
the disputes " and u Schemes of Union," more or less practicable, 
many of them without names or dates, but some bearing the 
names of Lord Drummond, Lord Hyde, Lord Marchmont, Paul 
Wentworth, and William Knox. 

William Knox, Under Secretary of State in the American 
Department for more than twelve years, is well known as a 
political writer. Paul Wentworth, who has already been 



XIX 



mentioned in connection with the New Hampshire Grants, 
turned his attention towards supplying the Government with 
secret information of the attitude of France and Holland 
towards the Colonies. He was later frequently employed 
confidentially by the Southern or Foreign Department to 
discover the exact position in which the American Com- 
missioners at Paris (Dr. Franklin, Deane, and Lee) stood with 
the French Ministry. One of his stipulations for remuneration 
was that of a seat in Parliament, and it is curious to note that 
he did obtain his wish for the short period of two and a half 
months, being elected for Saltash, 12th July 1780, which 
borough it is stated in the history of the Secret Service of 
George III. was " under the arrangement of Government with 
attention." The Parliament dissolved 1st September following. 

This notice would not be complete without a reference to the 
indefatigable Under Secretary, John Pownall. For many years 
Secretary to the Board of Trade and Plantations he became, 
in addition, when the office of Colonial Secretary was 
created, Under Secretary of State to that Department, 
filling both offices under Lord Hillsborough and Lord 
Dartmouth. He was returned to Parliament 23rd November 
1775 for St. Germans borough just after Dartmouth's resig- 
nation as Secretary of State, and 31st May 1776 was 
appointed one of the Commissioners of Excise, which may be 
the "cup of comfort " alluded to by himself on page 412. He 
was a brother of the better known Governor Thomas Pownall. 

The manuscripts relating more exclusively to the West India 
possessions are chiefly letters from the various Governors and 
Lieutenants-Governors and others on the affairs pertaining 
to the local governments, letters from applicants for the 
governorships and other posts, descriptions of the islands, &c. 

The manuscripts touching Canada, Labrador, Newfoundland, 
Nova Scotia and St. John's Island have, as already stated, been 
calendared by Mr. Douglas Brymner. 

The papers relating to the province of Quebec range from 
1757 to 1702 (pp. 545-573). From 1764 to 1772 they chiefly 
relate to the serious question of the establishment of courts and 
the impartial administration of justice in a newly acquired 
territory whose inhabitants had both language and laws of their 

E 82140. C 



XX 

own, to the question of the position of the Roman Catholics 
and to that of the legislative powers of the Governor and 
Council. Attention may be called to the additional instructions 
to Governor Murray as to the composition of juries in cases of 
British born subjects or Canadians ; a long report of the 
Attorney and Solicitor General on the measures for removing 
the various causes of complaints in the civil government 1766 
(p. 552); abstract of such of the regulations proposed in 
Mr. Solicitor General's Report as it may be expedient to 
establish by Act of Parliament, 6th December 1772 ; and 
abstract of such as the Provincial Legislature of Quebec may 
carry into execution. In 1773 and 1774 are drafts, memoranda, 
and correspondence on the constitutional change known as the 
Quebec Act. Here are many of the letters of Roubaud, a 
Jesuit priest and unprincipled man, who for many years 
continued to weary the Government with his persistent claims 
for attention and remuneration. 

Part of the papers on Labrador (pp. 574-580) deal with the 
mission and settlement of the Moravians at Esquimaux Bay. 
Their first attempt to establish a mission in Labrador was 
frustrated by the murder of the missionaries, but in 1764 the 
attempt was renewed. In 1769 an Order in Council was framed 
favouring the mission and granting the land desired by them. 
James Hutton, as Secretary to the Brethren's Mission, supplies 
Lord Dartmouth with reports of their proceedings. The other 
papers relate to George Cartwright and his seal and salmon 
fishing posts, and to the general regulations he proposes for the 
fisheries there. 

Of the few papers touching Newfoundland the most important 
are on the fortifications of St. John and Placentia. 

Those relating to Nova Scotia are more numerous. In 1766 
are memorials, proposals, &c, of Colonel Alexander McKnott for a 
settlement of lands on a large scale. The later papers 1775- 
1778 should be read with those of corresponding date calendared 
in the previous Report already noticed, especially such as relate 
to the dispute between Governor Legge and his Government. 
Here are Governor Legge's reply to the petitions brought 
against him, his defence of his conduct, and the report of the 
Board of Trade to the King, The Board, while finding that the 



XXI 

Governor " hath been wanting in that Gracious and Conciliating 
" Deportment which the delicacy of the times and the Temper 
" of Men .... demanded," acquitted him of the charges 
put forward, though they recommended he should not be 
allowed to return to the Island. 

An interesting pamphlet (p. 601) relating to St. John's Island, 
now Prince Edward Island, is that containing Lord Egmont's 
application for a grant of the whole island, with proposals for 
an elaborate system of settlement and tenure. This application 
was, disallowed, but in 1767 the Island was mapped out into 
various estates, most of which were disposed of in a great lottery 
held at the Board of Trade. In 1769 the Island was erected 
into a separate Government, but the failure of the proprietors 
in their agreement to pay such quit rent as should meet the 
Government charges, or, indeed, any quit rent at all, soon 
produced confusion and abuses which never rectified themselves, 
till, in our own time, the whole of the estates of the absentee 
proprietors were compulsorily bought up and the Island itself 
made a Province of the Dominion of Canada. 

Several bound manuscript volumes are in this collection, one 
in red morocco, gilt, entitled, " Transactions in America relative 
to the Boston Port Act, &c, in 1774," was apparently 
drawn up for the King ; another, in brown morocco, 
entitled " Massachusetts Bay, 1775," contains copies of 
correspondence between Lord Dartmouth and General Gage for 
that year ; a third is a list of offices, officers, how appointed, 
salary, and how paid, of the various Colonies in America and 
the West Indies ; and a fourth is a folio volume bound in calf 
containing the names of persons recommended as Governors, 
law officers and others in America, by whom they were 
recommended, and dates and references to the letters of 

recommendation. 

B. F. Stevens. 



MANUSCRIPTS OE THE EARL OE DARTMOUTH 
(FURTHER, REPORT). 



PART I. 

LETTERS AND PAPERS relating to the THIRTEEN 
AMERICAN COLONIES. 



•Charles [II.] to Herbert Jeffreys, Esq., Sir John Berry, knight, 

and Francis Morison, Esq. 

1676, October 3. Whitehall. — Commission to enquire into the 
divisions, disturbances, and disorders in Virginia. To receive every 
assistance from the Governor and other officials in the Plantation. To 
have what further assistance they think necessary from England. The 
opinion of two Commissioners to be the minimum. 

Copy. 4J pages. [Also in the Public Record Office, Colonial Entry 
Book 80, pp. 83-85.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Commission to enquire into grievances in 
Virginia. 

Virginia. 

[1676.] — Paper endorsed : Copy of the 6th Article of Additional 
Instructions to the Commissioners of Virginia. " You shall declare 
void and null all the proceedings of the late Assembly wherein the said 
Nathaniel Bacous and his Accomplices were pardoned, and force and 
violence offered to the Assembly." 

\ page. 

Note. — Mr. W. Noel Sainsbury, in his Calendar of State Papers preserved in the 
Public Kecord Office, indicates a number of documents relating to the rebellion of 
Nathaniel Bacon in Virginia. 

Virginia. 

[1676.] — Paper endorsed : Copy of the 6th Article of the propositions 
of the Inhabitants of Virginia respecting a new Charter. " That there 
shall be no Tax or Imposition laid on the People of Virginia but by 
their own consent/' 



I page 



College of William and Mart in Virginia. 

169J, February 8. Westminster. — Charter of Incorporation. The 
endowment to be 2,000/. English money. The Bishop of London ap- 

y 82140. A 



pointed first Chancellor for seven years, after which the governing 
body to elect their own Chancellor. 

Certified true copy by Henry Rooke, Clerk of the Rolls. In Latin, 
19 large pages (stamped paper) . 



Queen Mart to the Governor of New York [Benjamin 

Fletcher]. 

1694, August 21. Whitehall.— (Signed at foot J. Trinchard.) Upon 
the petition of William Penn to be restored, to the Government of 
Pennsylvania, the country of Newcastle and dependencies, and his 
assurances to provide for the safety and security of the province, he is 
restored to the administration, and thereby is revoked part of the 
commission to the Governor of New York of 21 October 1692. The 
orders to the colonies and provinces of the Northern parts of America, 
dated 11 October 1692, to assist New York against her enemies not 
having been attended to, W T illiam Penn and the Governors of Massa- 
chusets Bay, Virginia, Maryland, and Rhode Island have orders to raise 
men for the defence and security of New York. Mr. Penn has orders 
to establish militia in Pennsylvania and Newcastle for the assistance of 
New York when required. 

Copy. 5\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of Queen Mary's letter to the Governor of New 
York, 1694. 

Note.— Sir John Trenchard 1650—1695, Secretary of State 1693. 



The Queen to the Governor of Rhode Island. 

1694, August 21. Whitehall. — -Extract. The quota of militia to be 
furnished by Rhode Island and Providence for the assistance of New 
York is not to exceed 48 men. The Governor of New York instructed 
not to demand a larger force. 

2 pages. 

Church of England in America. 

[Not dated, ? about 1700.]— Paper headed, " The Case of His 
Majesty's Subjects, Members of the Church of England, in America." 
Detrimental effect the want of bishops has upon the Church of England 
in America. Desirability of appointing them. Archbishop Tenison's 
approbation of the scheme, gives 1,0U0/. towards completing it. 

2J pages. 

Endorsed : — The case of the Members of the Church of England in 
America. 



Westenhook Patent. 

1708, October 24. In Council at the fort at New York. — Edward 
Viscount Cornbury, Captain General, Governor- in -Chief, and Vice- 
Admiral over New York, Letters Patents for grant of land to Peter 
Schuyler, Derick Wessels, John Abeel, Jan Janse Bleecker, Ebenezer 
Willson, Peter Vanconnier, Doctor Daniell Cock, Thomas Whenham, 



3 

Henry Smith. For a grant of land known as Westenhook in accordance 
with Letters Patents of Queen Anne, dated 6 March 1705. 

Copy. Certified by Goldsbrow Banyar, D. Secretary, 16 September 
1760. 8\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of the Westenhook patent, 6 March 1708. 
Westenhook. Agreement. 



Revenue in New York. 

17|J, March 1. St. James's. — Copy of an Order of Her Majesty in 
Council. Upon a representation of the Lords of Trade of the 16th 
February previous as to the a Difficulties of obtaining the settlement of 
a Revenue at New York." Ordered that heads of a bill be drawn up 
and laid before Parliament " for enacting a Standing Revenue " equal 
to the usual allowances in the Province of New York. 

2 pages. 

Revenue in New York. 

17}y, March 13. — Copy of a Paper endorsed, "Heads of an Act for 
granting a Revenue to Her Majesty to arise within the Province of New 
York in America for the Support of that Government." 

3 2 pages. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1711, June 9 and 12. — Paper endorsed, "Extract from an Abstract 
of the Journal of the proceedings of the Governor, Council, and 
Assembly of the Province of the Massachusets Bay in New England." 
Concerning " the raising, encouraging, support, and paying of the 
Soldiers appointed for the Quota of this province." " Voted, the 
emitting of a proclamation for encouraging the expedition." 

1| pages. 

New York. 

N. D. Endorsed [1711, query in error for 1700 or 1 701]. — " Extract 
of a Letter for His Majesty's Signature to the Earl of Bellomont, 
relating to the security of New York." In case of an invasion of New 
York, the other Colonies are to furnish a certain quota of men, or money 
in the place of it. 

\\ pages. 



Lord Dartmouth to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and 

Plantations. 

1712, August 21. Whitehall. — Expressing the Queen's displeasure at 
prisoners being sent home " in Custody from the Plantations, without 
any Evidence of their Crimes." The Board to write to the Governors 
requesting them not to send any more prisoners without full proofs of 
their guilt. 

Copy. 1 page. 

A 2 



4 

Board of Trade to Lord Archibald Hamilton, Governor of 

Jamaica. 

1712, August 27. Whitehall.— (Lord Guilford, Ph. Meadows, Arthur 
Moore, and J. Hynde Cotton). 
Copy. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — Copy letter to Lord Archibald Hamilton, Governor of 
Jamaica, directing him not to send over any persons as prisoners 
"without transmitting at the same time full proof of their guilt. 
Dated August 27th, 1712. 

A memorandum on the same subject follows. These three papers 
are in a wrapper marked " Precedent in regard to persons sent over 
prisoners from the Plan 8 ." 



I P^e. 



Revenue in New York. 



1713, May 4. St. James's. — Copy of an Order in Council. With 
regard to the complaints against the New York General Assembly made 
in a letter from the Lords of Trade to Earl Dartmouth, it is u Ordered 
that Draught of a Bill ' for granting a Revenue to Her Majesty in 
that Province ' be recommended to the consideration of the House of 
Commons. " 

H pages. 

Regulation of Governments in America. 

N. D. — Copy of " A Bill for the better Regulation of Charter and 
Proprietary Governments in America, and for the Encouragement of the 
Trade of this Kingdom and of Her Majesty's Plantations." 

4 pages. 

Instructions to Samuel Shute. 

1716. — Copy of the 27th Article of the General Instructions for 
Samuel Shute, Esq., His Majesty's Governor of the Massachusets 
Bay, in New England, 1716. " His Majesty particularly requires and 
commands that no Money or value of Money whatsoever be given or 
granted by any Act or Order of Assembly to any Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, or Commander-in-Chief of the said Province, which shall 
not according to the Stile of Acts of Parliament in Great Britain be 
mentioned to be given and granted unto His Majesty." 

If pages. [The Instructions in full are in the Public Record Office, 
Board of Trade, New England, Vol. 43, fo. 418.] 



Carolina. 

1720, July 28. Thursday. — Extract from the journal of the Lords 
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. " Their Lordships then 
taking Notice to Mr. Ashley and Mr. Danson of a Report spread 
Abroad, as if the Lords Proprietors of Carolina had disposed of their 
Government and Property in Carolina, and recommending it to them, 
that His Majesty might have the Refusal thereof, they acknowledged 
that they were in Treaty for Disposing of it." Necessity for 
strengthening the Province with white people. 

1 J pages. 



Carolina. 

1720, September 27. Whitehall. — Order in Council. 
Copy. h\ pages. . 

Endorsed .-—Copy of an Order of Council, dated 27th September 1720,. 
for bringing a Scire facias to resume the Carolina Charter. 

Virginia. 

1728, December 10. — Francis Fane. Report to the Lords Com- 
missioners of Trade and Plantations. Consideration of an Act passed 
in Virginia laying a duty on imported slaves and appointing a treasurer. 
" The first Act of this kind which met with an opposition from the 
Merchants of Great Britain was passed in the year 1723, and laid the 
same duty of 40s. a head upon all Negroes imported into Virginia." Its 
effects upon the trade of Virginia. Two reasons why this Act is not fit 
to be passed into law. 

Copy. 5 J pages. 

Endorsed. — Copy of Mr. Fane's Report upon an Act passed in 
Virginia, 30th March 1728, for laying a duty on slaves imported, 
&c. (No. 1.) 

Note.— Francis Fane, M.P. for Taunton 1728, 1734, Petersfield 1741, Ilchester 
1747, a commissioner for trade ; died member for Lyme Regis 28 May 1757 
aged 59. His brother Thomas succeeded as eighth Earl of Westmoreland. 

Trade and Manufactures in the Colonies. 

1734, Aprilis 5, Veneris. — Report, in the form of resolutions, of the 
Committee " appointed to Consider the Representation of the Com- 
missioners for Trade and Plantations laid before this House the 23rd 
of January last, relating to the Laws made, Manufactures set up, and 
Trade carried on in any of His Majesty's Colonies and plantations in 
America, which may have affected the Trade, Navigation, and Manu- 
factures of this Kingdom." 

MS. 2 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — 1734. Report Committee on Representation, Trade, and 
Plantations. 

Greenwich Hospital Charges. 

1741-64. — Paper endorsed, " Money remitted from the several 
Ports in America towards the Support of Greenwich Hospital, being an 
Abatement out of Merchant Seamen's Wages, after the rate of sixpence 
a Man a Month." 

1 page. 

New York. 

1746, March 3.— The King's Warrant for George Clarke, Esq., 
late Lieutenant-Governor of New York, to be paid the sum of 4,000/. 
(arising from the duty of 4J per cent, from Barbadoes and the Leeward 
Islands) for services rendered and losses sustained during the insurrection' 
and burning of New York Fort in 1741 by Romish Priests and. 
rebellious negroes. 

Copy. If pages. 

Endorsed: — King's Warrant, Geo. Clarke, Esq., 4,000/., out of 4 J. 
per cent., on a report from the Auditor of the Plantations. 
(Copy.) 



6 



New Hampshire. 



1752, August 14. — D. Ryder and W. Murray, Attorney and Solicitor 
General. Opinion on the right of the Crown to resume lands in New 
Hampshire. 

Copy. 2\ pages. [The original signed paper is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, New Hampshire, Vol. 3, B. 47.] 

Appeals. 

Three papers marked : — Instruction concerning Appeals before 
1753. 

7 J pages in all. 

New Hampshire Militia. 

1755, February 5. Boston. — William Shirley, Captain-General and 
Governor-in -Chief of Massachusetts Bay. Commission to Robert Noble 
as Captain of the fifth Company of Foot in the Southern Regiment of 
Militia, county of New Hampshire, John Worthington, Colonel. 
Signed W. Shirley, and J. Willard, Secretary. 

Original. 1 page. With seal. 

1755, February 5. Boston. — The same to Thomas Whitney as 
Lieutenant. 

Original. 1 page. With seal. 

Memorandum on back : — To insist to have the people quieted till the 
matter can be dissided. 



Massachusetts Bay. 

1755, April 26. Province of the Massachusetts Bay. — Report of the 
Committee appointed to consider the petition of William Joiner and 
others respecting the distressed circumstances of the people in the 
Province Lands, <fcc. Read in the House of Representatives 26 April, 
accepted and sent up for concurrence. Read in Council 26th April 
and sent down for concurrence. Read and concurred in the House of 
Representatives same day. Copy examined by Thomas Clarke, Deputy 
Secretary. 

Copy certified. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Committee's Report about Lands west of Sheffield. 
Copy. 

College of Philadelphia. 

1755, May 14. — Copy of the additional charter of the College, 
Academy and Charitable School of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. The 
trustees to be capable of purchasing and taking lands or estates for 
the use of the College, &c. To have one public and one privy seal. 
Degrees to be granted to students. This charter to be good in the law. 
The estate, &c, of the corporation not to exceed 5,000/. sterling per 
annum. 

1 1 pages. 

Endorsed: — Pennsylvania Charter. 



Indian Congress. 

1755, December 15-18. Augusta. — Abstract of Proceedings at a 
Conference held at Augusta in the Colony of Georgia on Monday loth 
December 1755, between William Little, Esq., a. Commissioner on 
behalf of His Excellency John Reynolds, Esq., Captain-General and 
Governor-in-Chief of His Majesty's Colony of Georgia and Vice- Admiral 
of the same, and the head men and deputies of the Upper Creek nation 
of Indians. 

4 J pages. 

Endorsed-, — Mr. Levy. 



Secretary H. Fox to Colonel Webb. 

1756, March 31. Whitehall. — Marked secret. On his arrival in North 
America to " make the strictest inquiry, in conjunction with Sir Charles 
Hardy, into the author or authors of the two anonymous letters, lately 
intercepted from America, addressed to the Due de Mirepoix." George 
Croghan supposed to be the author. Sends under flying seal his letter 
to recall Governor Shirley. 

Copy. 1| pages. 

Note. — A biographical notice of George Croghan, Deputy Agent for Indian 
affairs and an influential man among the Indians, is given in O'Callaghan's 
" Documents relative to the Colonial History of New York," VI ?., 982. 



Secretary H. Fox to the Earl of Loudon. 

1756, May 7. Whitehall. — Marked secret. Acquainting him of the 
steps taken with respect to the two anonymous intercepted letters from 
America addressed to the Due de Mirepoix. Since the departure of 
Colonel Webb a duplicate of the second intercepted letter has been 
sent to Londonderry in Ireland by a person under the name of James 
Allen of Philadelphia under cover of the enclosed letter to Mr. Gamble 
of that place. 

Copy. \\ pages. 



Deed of Sale of Land from the Stockbridge Indians. 

1756, May 25.— For 200/. to Robert Noble, Thcmas Whitney, 
Japhet Hunt, and John McArthur. Hampshire, May 27th, 1756. 
Certified by Joseph Dwight, J.P., to be the free act and deed of the 
above-named Indians. Springfield, March 17th, 1757. Received and 
recorded in the Records for the County of Hampshire, Libro y folio 575, 
&c, &c. Examined by Edward Pynchon, Registrar. 

Original signed (Indian marks) with six seals. 

, Endorsed : — A deed of the Stockbridg Ingems. To Robert Noble 
and others. 



Spencer Town Liberty of Purchase. 

1756, Friday, August 27. Boston. — Massachusetts Bay Hou^e of 
Representatives. Order concerning the petition of Trueman Powell and 
others,, empowering them to purchase land from the Stockbridge 



Indians similar to that lately sold to Captain Robert Noble; also- 
appointing Eldad Taylor to see that justice is done in the affair. 
Copy certified by A. Oliver. l£ pages. 

Endorsed : — Spencer Town Liberty of Purchase of the Indians. 

Deed of Sale of Land from the Stockbeidge Indians. 

1756, September 27. — To Truman Powell, Joseph Chillendeu, Joel 
Spencer, and several 'others, for the sum of 230/., New York currency. 
Hampshire, Sheffield, September 27th, 1756. Acknowledged by the 
Indians before Timothy Woodbridge, J.P., to be their own act and 
deed. Received March 20th, 1760, and recorded from the original per 
Edward Pynchon, Registrar. 

Copy certified. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Indian Deed to Truman Powell and others. Copy. 

JYote. — Timothy Woodbridge, schoolmaster in Stockbridge from 1734 ; a ^magis- 
trate and counsellor; died 1774. 

Rhode Island. 

1756-64, — Extracts from the proceedings of the Rhode Island 
Assembly, held at Newport on the fourth Monday in August 1756, 
21st of September 1762, and at East Greenwich on the last Monday 
in February 1764. The first proceedings relate to the Act for calling 
in and sinking bills ol credit emitted by this Colony, called Crown 
Point Bills ; the second, to an Act for supplying the General Assembly 
with 8,000/., by levyiug a tax upon this Colony ; the third, to " An 
Act for the more Speedy calling in and sinking all the outstanding 
Bills of Credit, emitted by Verdict of an Act of the General Assembly 
of this Colony made and passed at their Session held by Adjournment 
at providence on the 18th Day of March A.D. 1750 (which is called 
the ninth Bank) and were let out upon Loan ; And likewise for putting 
a final End to the name of Old Tenor, throught this Colony." Con- 
cludes with a rhyming protest against the last Act by James Barker, 
junior. 

" N.B. — Mr. Barker was then a Member of the Lower House. The 
foregoing Extracts were taken from printed Schedules published by 
Authority." 

2| pages. 

Deed of Sale of Land by the Stockbridge Indians. 

1757, March 15.— For 261/., to John Halmbeck, William Halmbeck, 
Andrew Reas, and several others, amongst whom are Benjamin 
Franklin and Benjamin Franklin, junior. Hampshire, March 16, 
1757. Sworn to before Timothy Woodbridge, J.P., to be the free and 
voluntary act and deed of the said Indians. April 7th, 1768. Received, 
and recorded from the original per Mark Hopkins, Registrar. 

Copy certified. 1 J pages. 

Endorsed: — The Deed of Rawkawnuck. 2/(y. 

1758, November 22. — Another .Deed of Sale of Land by the same 
Indians for 250/. to Samuel Robbins, Asa Douglass, and several others, 
amongst whom are Benjamin Willard and Andrew Stevens. Hamp- 



9 

shire, Sheffield, January 26th 1759. Sworn to by the said Indians to- 
be their act and deed before Coram Joseph Dwight, J.P. Certified by 
Goldsbrow Banyar. 
Copy, Z\ pages. 

Endorsed: — 22nd November 1758. Copy Indian Deed to Samuel 
Bobbins and others. No. 1. 



Thomas Whitney. 

1758, December 7, Springfield. — Writ served upon Thomas Whitney 
to appear at the Inferior Court of Common Pleas to be hold en at 
Northampton in New Hampshire on the second Tuesday in February 
next to answer the charge of not paying Ebenezer Fletcher the sum. of 
71. 9s., New York currency. 

Original signed and sealed. 1 small quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Rit from Boston. 

On the back are several figures, apparently calculations. 



Mr. Secretary Pitt to His Majesty's Governors. 

1758, December 9. — " The King is further pleased to furnish all the 
Men so raised as above with Arms, Ammunition, and Tents, as well 
as to order Provisions to be issued to the same by His Majesty's Com- 
missaries in the same proportion and manner as is done to the rest of 
the King's Forces." . . . . " The whole therefore that the King 
expects and requires from the several Provinces is, the Levying, 
Cloathing, and paying the Men." Parliament in the next session is 
to be recommended to make a proper compensation for the services 
rendered by the respective Provinces. 

Extract. 1 J pages. 



Mr. Secretary Pitt to the North American Governors. 

1758, December 9. — Extracts. " The King is further most graciously 
pleased to permit me to acquaint you, that strong Recommendations- 
will be made to Parliament in their Session next year, to grant a 
proper compensation for such Expenses, according as the active Vigour 
and strenuous Efforts of the respective Provinces shall justly appear 
to merit." In the second extract each Governor is asked to induce the- 
Council and Assembly of his Province to raise at least as large a body 
of men as they did for the last campaign. 

\\ pages. 

Georgia. Bosomworth Lands. 

Memorandum of proceedings from 17^9 to 1759, with reference to 
lands obtained from the Indians, now part of the Province of Georgia, 
and claimed by Thomas Bosomworth, whose right to a portion of it is 
further disputed by a Mr. Levy. 

]1 pages. 

1757, November 25 and December 7. — Extracts of two letters from 
Governor Ellis, Georgia, to the Lords of Trade. With reference to 
the purchase of the Bosomworth lands. These extracts are followed 



10 

by observations tending to show that the Governor and Bosom worth 
had laid their heads together to the prejudice of Mr. Levy, whose case 
is now before the Lords of Trade. 
2\ pages. 

" A Case relating to Lands taken, by instructions from the Crown, 
and afterwards restored," possibly to serve as a precedent for the above. 
"In the year 1732 Samuel Waldo and others propriators of certain 
Lands petitioned His Majesty to be restored to Lands taken and 
withheld from them by instructions from the Crown to David Dunbar, 
which petition was refered to the Lords of the Committy. Where- 
upon they reported to His Majesty that the Attorney and Solicitor- 
General to whom it was rcfer'd for their opinion observed on their 
report, that some objections were made before them to the Nature of 
the Grants and Conveyances, under which the petitioners claimed 
and to the Manner of deduceing down their title, but they conceive 
that in questions of this kind concerning rights to Land in the West 
Indias and upon enquirys of this nature the same regularity and 
exactness is not to be expected as in private Suits concerning titles 
to Lands in England, but that in these cases the principle regard 
ought to be had to the Possession and the Expences the partys have 
been at in endeavouring to Settle and Cultivate such Lands." 
Therefore upon the whole they are of opinion that the petitioners, 
their Tenants and Agents, ought not to be disturbed in their possession 
or interrupted in Carrying on their Settlements." This report having 
been laid by the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations before 
the Committee, the Committee proceed to take the whole matter into 
consideration and report to His Majesty that they are of opinion 
with the Attorney and Solicitor- General, and are further of opinion 
that it may be advisable for His Majesty to revoke the instructions, and 
order Dunbar to quit possession of all the said lands. "The aforegoing 
is a similar case with Mr. Levy's." Mr. Levy's lands had been in 
his possession upwards of 12 years. 

1 £ pages, 

Cadwallader Colden, Surveyor- General, to the Earl 

of Halifax. 

1759, August 25. New York. — Relative to grants of lands and 
assessment of quit-rents in New York. 
Copy. \Q\ pages. 

Cousaponakees, an Indtan Princess. 

1755-59. Paper containing : — 

An extract of the Memorial and Representation of Cousaponakees, 
a natural born princess of the Upper and Lower Creek Nations, 
dated the 30th of June 1755, so far as relates to the report made 
thereon by the Lords of Trade and Plantation, dated Whitehall 
6th December 1758. 

Extract of the Report of the Lords of Trade dated 6th December 
1758, on the foregoing memorial of Cousaponakees as presented 
to the Lords of the Regency the 30th June 1755. To the Right 
Honourable the Lords of the Committee of His Majesty's most 
Honourable Privy Council for Plantation affairs. 



11 

Extract of Instructions to Henry Ellis, Governor of Georgia. 
St. James's, the ... . day of ... . 1759. With 
observations. 
19 \ pages. 

Rank and Precedence in America. 

1760, December 17. St. James's. — Copy of Royal Warrant for 
settling the Rank and Precedence in America. Per W. Pitt. 

2| pages. 

Lord Egremont to the Governor of South Carolina. 

1761, December 12. Whitehall. — "I am therefore to signify to you, 
the King's pleasure, that you do immediately upon the Receipt of this 
Letter exert your utmost Influence to induce your Province to carry 
into the most Speedy and most Effectual Execution this very important 
object by immediate Compliance with any requisition which Sir Jeffry 
Amherst shall in Consequence of His Majesty's Orders make for 
furnishing, on certain Conditions which he will explain to you such 
number of Recruits from your Province as he shall demand as their 
quota towards compleating the Regular Regiments which have been 
sent to America for the Defence and Protection of the Possessions of 
his Majesty's Subjects there." 

Extract. 1 ^ pages. 

Note. — Thomas Boone, the Governor of South Carolina, was appointed 14 April 
1761. He was transferred from the Government of New Jersey. 

Revenue in America. 

Paper containing notes and references from various law books relating 
to the revenues of several Colonies. (Partly in Lord Dartmouth's 
hand.) " From 1756 to 1763 Massachusetts Bay raised above 800,000/., 
which being spent among themselves, there was no decay of the 
Trade," &c. 

7 quarto pages. 

George III. Royal Proclamation. 

1763, October 7. St. James's. — Notifying, as a result of the extensive 
acquisitions in America secured by the Paris Treaty of 10 Februar/ 
1763, the erection of four distinct and separate Governments, Quebec, 
East Florida, West Florida, and Grenada, and defining their limits and 
jurisdiction. 

Printed broadside. 

Endorsed : — Proclamation of 7th October 1763. 



Governor Francis Bernard to the Board of Trade. 

1763, December 26. Boston. 
Autograph letter signed. 4| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Massachusets. Letter from Fras. Bernard, Esq., 
Governor of Massachusets Bay, to the Board, dated December 26, 
1763, relative to the execution of the Laws of Trade in that 



12 

province, and the necessity of encouraging a trade between North' 
America and the foreign Plantations, under proper restrictions. 

Received March, 1 1hTC , T1 ^ 

Bead July 2, ) I764 ' U ° 8 - 

Dr. Wheelock's Indian Charity School. 

1763. — Printed pamphlet, entitled "A plain and faithful Narrative of 
the Original Design, Rise, Progress, and present State of the Indian 
Charity School at Lebanon, in Connecticut. By Eleazar Wheelock, A.M., 
Pastor of a Church in Lebanon." Boston. Printed by Richard and 
Samuel Draper, in Newbury Street, MDCCLXIII. 

54 octavo pages in paper cover. 

Note. — In " A History of Dartmouth College and the [Town of Hanover, New 
Hampshire, by Frederick Chase, edited by John K. Lord, Cambridge (U. S.) r 
1891," 8vo., xi. and 682 pp., illustrated with portraits of Eleazar Wheelock, John 
Thornton, Nathaniel Whitaker, John Wentworth, and Bezaleel Woodward, and 
several Plans and Letters, is an interesting account of the foundation and sub- 
sequent vicissitudes of this Indian school, which, in 1769, took the name of 
Dartmouth College from William, Earl of Dartmouth. The correspondence in that 
volume is now mostly preserved in the library of the College, and largely consists 
of the letters and papers received by Dr. Wheelock and others ; many of their 
letters to Lord Dartmouth will be found in the followiog pages. 

Rhode Island. 

1764, May 1. Newport on Rhode Island. — Copy" 1 of a letter not 
signed nor addressed. Concerning the paper currency of the Colony of 
Rhode Island. Quotes a letter previously written, 10 April 1752. 

Copy . 2 \ folio p ages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of two letters, one of them dated April 10th, 1752. 
The other . . May 1st, 1764. Concerning the paper currency 
of the Colony of Rhode Island. 
Khtde Island. Paper Currency. 

House of Representatives of Massachusets Bay to their 
-Agent Mr. Mauduit. 

1764, June 13. — Acknowledge receipt of letters of 30 December, 
11 February, 13 and 23 March. Express surprise at the contents of 
these letters. Refer to the Sugar Act, maintenance of the army, 
taxation, commerce, and stamp duty. 

Copy. 1 1 folio pages. 

Plan for the Future Management of Indian Affairs. 

[1764, July.] — With Lists A and B of Indian tribes in the northern 
and southern districts. 

14 folio pages. [Various copies of this paper are found in the Public 
Record Office, the British Museum, and among the MSS. at Lansdowne 
House.] 

Endorsed : — Plan for the future management of Indian Affairs. 

Governor George Johnstone to JonN Pownall. 

1764, September 25. Kingston, Jamaica. — By the report of sundry 
persons, who have come from Pensacola, the inhabitants are in a 



13 

deplorable situation from lack of necessaries and cash. This has been 
-caused by the seizure of three Spanish vessels, laden with cash, by 
English captains, through a mistaken zeal. 

Extract. 1 folio page. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
•Office, Board of Trade, West Florida, Vol. 1, folio 103. "| 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from George Johnstone, Esq., 
Governor of West Florida, to John Pownall, Esq., Secretary to 
the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dat ed 
Jamaica, Kingston, September 25th, 1764. 

Governor George Johnstone to John Pownall. 

1764, October 31. Penzacola. — The Spanish trade, so far from being 
encouraged, has been obstructed in every way. Refers to the seizure of 
the Spanish vessels laden with cash, and desires instructions concerning 
•commerce generally. 

Extract. 1J- folio pages. [The original letter is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, West Florida, Vol. 1, fol. 117.] 

Endorsed. — Extract of a letter from George Johnston, Esq., Governor 
of West Florida, to John Pownall, Esq., Secretary to the Lords 
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dated Penzacola, October 
31st, 1764. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1764, November 3. — Extracts from the petition of the Council and 
House of Representatives of Massachusets Bay to the House of Commons, 
and from their Instructions to their Agent. 

1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — The petition of the Council and House of Reprentatives 
of His Majesty's Province of Massachusets Bay Relative to the 
Imposing Stamp Duties or Taxes upon the Inhabitants of the 
Colonies. Boston, November 3rd, 1764. 

Forsey v. Cunningham. 

1764. — Printed pamphlet entitled l( Report of the case between 
Thomas Forsey and Waddel Cunningham, New York." Printed by 
John Holt in the year 1764. 

71 pages. 

Sir William Johnson to the King. 

1765, January 5. — Memorial. Relates his services among the 
Indians. His great expenses in connection therewith. Desires some 
compensation either in cash or lands. 

5| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Memorial of Sir William Johnson, dated Januarv 5th, 
1765. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1765, January 16, 17, 21, and 23. — Refers to letters from several 
<jovernors in America and memorials from Boone and Garth. Part on 
Senegambia and the gum trade. 

2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Min. Jan. 16, 17, 21, 23, 1765, Carolina, Virginia, 
Senegambia. 



14 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N. D. [1765, about January]. — Mentions letters from Governors 
Bernard 10 November 1764, Hopkins 12 November, and Fitch 
13 November. 

i folio page. 

Governor George Johnstone to John Pownall. 

1765, February 19. Mobile. — Begins, " Our next Neighbours of 
consequence are the Spaniards," and refers to the trade with them. 

Extract. | folio page. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, West Florida, Vol. 1, fol. 233.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from George Johnstone, Esq., 
Governor of West Florida, to John Pownall, Esq., Secretary to the 
Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dated Mobile 
19th February 1765. 

Pennsylvania Merchants to the Board of Trade. 

1765, February. Philadelphia. — Memorial. Desiring relief, having 
credited a large number of traders with goods to supply the Indians. 
In violation of treaties, the Indians have murdered some traders and 
expelled the remainder from their country. Consequently these merchants 
have received no payment for their goods. 

Copy. \\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a memorial to the Right Honourable the Lords 
of Trade. 

Alexander Cameron to Ensign George Price. 

1765, March 16 and 27. Toquo — -With note by G. P[rice]. 
" Mr. Tinkler will certainly run a great risk if ever he comes to this 
quarter, and particularly if Rum should be in the way." 

Extracts. 3£ folio pages. 

Endorsed . — Extracts from Mr. Cameron's letters to Mr. Price, sent 
March 16th, 1765, to Captain Cochran at Charlestown (about a 
design to kill all the white people in the Cherokee country, 
and about the fFrench prisoners.) 

Note. — Mr. Cameron was commissary for Indian affairs. Ensign Price, 60th 
Kegiment, was commanding officer at Fort Prince George, South Carolina. 

Governor George Johnstone to John Pownall. 

1765, May 4. Penzacola. — On considering the various productions 
of His Majesty's other Colonies, he despairs of seeing this settlement 
flourishing unless Spanish commerce is permitted. Cannot conceive 
why it is stopped. 

Extract. | page. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, West Florida, Vol. 1, fol. 341.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from George Johnstone, Esq., 
Governor of West Florida, to John Pownall, Esq., Secretary to 
the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dated 
Penzacola, May 4th, 1765 



15 



Ensign George Price. 



1765, May 14. — Journal of Proceedings with the Great Warrior 
and other Cherokee Indians. 
4 folio pages. 



Alexander Cameron to Ensign George Price. 

1765, May 16. Toquo. — Will do all in his power to serve the 
Lieut.-Governor and Capt. Cochrane and prove to the Indians that 
these men have their interests at heart. Will endeavour to find out all 
embassies that are sent amongst them. The French have sent to the 
Cherokees, desiring a " Talk," but the overture is not believed by the 
Cherokees. „ . 

Extract. 1 J folio pages. 

Endorsed on a wrapper covering also Price's Journal of 14 May : — 
Accounts from Fort Prince George in South Carolina. 



Virginia. 

N. D. [1765, June 5, covering letter.] — Four Resolutions of the 
House of Burgesses. Signed, John Randolph. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Virginia. Resolution of House of Burgesses in Virginia 
relative to the privileges of the people of that Colony. In 
Lt.-Govr's letter of June 5th, 1765. Read. 



Virginia. 

[1765, June 18.] — "A gentleman in Philadelphia to his friend in 
this town [Newport], dated last Tuesday [18 June 1765]." News- 
paper cutting, being an item quoted from the M Newport Mercury," 
24 June 1765. Encloses the Resolves of the Virginia Assembly on 
debating the Stamp Act. Gives six Resolutions relative to taxation of 
the Colony, which being so extraordinary, the Governor, on hearing 
of them, dissolved the Assembly. [Three of the resolutions quoted in 
this letter are the same as those entered above.] 



Stamp Act. 

1765, June 19. — A merchant in Philadelphia to his correspondent in 
London. Cutting from the London "Chronicle" for 1765. The Act 
of Parliament imposing a stamp duty on the American Colonies, just 
published, occasions very great uneasiness. 

2£ printed columns. 



Governor James Wright to the Board of Trade. 

1765, June 28. Savannah in Georgia. — Relative to his conduct with 
regard to Spanish vessels coming into the ports of that province. 

Copy. 3^ folio pages. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, Georgia, Vol. 30, fol. 173.] 



16 

Governor Francis Bernard to the Board of Trade. 

1765, July 8. Boston. — Considers no Council whatever could act 
-with more prudence and steadiness in the present exigencies than this 
has, and that it is a good deal owing to their discretion and authority 
that the House of Representatives has hitherto (with one exception) 
"been kept within the bounds of decency and moderation, which many 
other Assemblies have greatly exceeded. It was moved in the House 
early in the session that the House should take into consideration the 
difficulties the Colonies will be reduced to by some late Acts of 
Parliament. Committees appointed to meet at New York on 1st October 
to discuss the consequences, and to consider of a general address to the 
King and Parliament. It is the general opinion that nothing will be 
done in consequence of this intended Congress. 

Extract. 2^ folio pages. [The original letter is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, Massachusetts, Vol. 78, fol. 525.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Governor Bernard to the Lords 
of Trade, dated Boston, 8th July 1765. 



Dr. Wheelock's Indian Charity School. 

Abstracts and copies of several letters addressed to the Reverend 
Eleazer Wheelock by some of his former pupils who had become 
(missionaries or schoolmasters. From 10 June to 19 July 1765. 

Fastened together. 49^ quarto pages. 

The writers are : — Samuel Kirtland [Kirkland], 10 June and 
19 July 1765; David Fowler, 15 and 24 June; Joseph Woolley, July 
and 6 July; and Theophilus Chamberlain, 10, 17, and 19 July. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Wheelock's school. 



Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N. D. [1765, July.] — Relative to Portuguese and American trade 
with Great Britain, and the general causes affecting the same. One item 
dated 24 July 1765. 

3 guar co pages. 

Endorsed: — Portugal Trade with Great Britain. 

Dennys de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

£1765, July (received). — His pleasure at seeing Lord Dartmouth 
•nominated First Lord of Trade. Hopes he will be the means of re- 
trieving the commerce and harmony that formerly existed between 
America and England. States the disadvantages under which the 
commerce now labours in regard to Spain, France, and England. 
Letter signed. 2\ large pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. De Berdt ; Rec d July 1765. 

Dennys de Berdt to Lokd Dartmouth. 

P1765, August 6. Artillery Court. — Sends a letter from Boston, 
showing the confusion in which the American trade now is. Fails to 
see how taxes drawn from America by the proposed measures can 
compensate for the misery caused thereby and the ruin of the merchants. 



17 

The new regulations and taxes have sunk the value of His Majesty's 
dominions in America 20 per cent. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. De Berdt. 

Doctor John Fothergill to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, August -J. Near Middlewick, Cheshire. — Congratulations. 
Recommends Capel Hanbury, merchant in London, as a person well 
versed in American trade, and worthy of Lord Dartmouth's confidence. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Dr. Fothergill 7 August 1765. 

Dr. Wheelock's Indian Charitt School. 

1765, August 8. Johnson Hall. — Sir Wiliiam Johnson. Recom- 
mendation of Mr. Wheelock's school, headed, " Copy of a Letter from 
Sir William Johnson." Recommends the Indian school, and agrees 
with enlargement of plan. Application to Britain to enable a number 
of missionaries to be employed in the Indian country. 

1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Sir Wm Johnson, August 8th, 1765. Indian School 
Connecticut. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Halifax. 

1765, August 10. New York. — The erecting a fort at the mouth of 
the Missouri will be the best thing the French can do to be a check on 
the English and extend their own trade. Thinks it would be proper to 
have a fort at the mouth of the Illinois to prevent the French trading 
up the Lakes. 

Extract. l£ folio pages. [The original letter is in the Public 
Record Office, America and West Indies, Vol. 121, fol. 681.] (, 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Major-General Gage to the 
Earl of Halifax dated New York 10 August 1765. 

Lord Hyde to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, August 13. The Grove. — Thinks the affair given in the 
enclosures can be settled privately, and had better not be produced at 
a public Board. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lord Hyde with Colonel Tryon's papers August 1765. 
Enclosures : — 

Colonel William Tryon to the Board of Trade. 

1765, June 24. Brunswick, North Carolina. — Explains his 
transactions with Messrs. Jouvencell and Bridgen in respect to 
the agency for the province of North Carolina. 
Letter signed. 3£ folio pages. 

William Hunter to Lieutenant-Governor William Trydn. 

1765, March 2. — Relative to the charges brought against Colonel 
Tryon by disputants for the office of agent for the province. 
Copy. 2 folio pages. 

y 82140. B 



18 

The Earl of Moira to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, August 19. Moira, near Dromore, Ireland. — Desires him to 
recommend his petition for a grant of land, so that he and others now 
anxious to settle in America may be enabled to do so. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Karl of Moira. August 1765. 

Enclosures : — 

Earl of Moira and several others. Petition to the King. John, 
Earl of Moira, William Taylor, William Burton, etc. desire 
o,000 acres each in West Florida in the neighbourhood of the 
Mississippi, and promise to cultivate thereon the branches of 
commerce so much needed, but now purchased at an immense 
expense from foreign nations. 
l\ pages. 

Endorsed on wrapper: — Petition of the Earl of Moira 
and al. 

Pen and ink sketch of the land desired by the Earl of Moira. 



J. or T. Price to Lord Dartmouth, First Commissioner of the 

Council of Commerce. 

1765, August 27. — A zeal for the glory and interest of real humanity 
and the good policy of the nation and colonies, induces the writer to 
address Lord Dartmouth desiring him to exert his influence to send 
orders to the Governors in America to prohibit, under severe penalties, 
the use, sale, purchase, and possession of scalping knives. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Price. August 1765. 



Dr. John Fothergill to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, August 29. Lea Hall. — The late acts and regulations have 
caused universal discontent in America. Suggests that commissioners 
be chosen to go over to America to confer with others chosen by 
the respective Governments there to confer on the subject of these 
complaints. Shows the advisability of such a conference to gain a 
correct knowledge of the Americans, and avert the independence they 
seem to desire. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed on wrapper : — Dr. Fothergill, August 29, 1765. 
Endorsed on first page : — Lea Hall 31st instant. 



Stamp Act. 

1765, September 3. — Article signed Cassariensis. Newspaper cut- 
ting, headed " New York, September 12." Remarks on the resignation 
of several of the stamp officers. Hopes this laudable example will be 
universally imitated, else disastrous effects will follow. 

Printed. 1 strip. 



19 

Dennys de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1765, 'September 5. — Seeks to show the injustice of taxation and 
sending troops to America. Remarks on the sole right of the Americans 
to tax themselves by their own representatives. 

Letter signed. 6\ folio pages. 

Autograph Note. — "My hand being difficult to read, I ordered my 
dark to transcribe it." 

Endorsed : — Received September 5, 1765. 

Mohock Indians to the King. 

1765, September 14. Johnson Hall. — (Transcribed by their desire 
in the presence of Sir William Johnson and transmitted by Lord Adam 
Gordon.) Address. Assure him of their loyalty. Complain of the 
treatment of the English toward them in regard to the land called 
Kayaderosseras. Desire relief. 

2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — To the King's most Excellent Majesty, the Humble 
Address of the Mohawk Indians. 

Rhode Island. 

Newspaper cutting, headed '* Newport, 16 September 1765," giving on 
one side six resolutions of the Rhode Island Assembly of last session, and 
on the other, a letter from Thomas Ringgold to Mr. Green, 27 August 
1765, refuting a report that he had applied for the office of distributor of 
stamps for Maryland. 

The Resolutions begin : l ' This Assembly taking into the most serious 
consideration an Act passed by the Parliament of Great Britain at 
their last sessions, for levying stamp duties and other internal duties 
in North America, do resolve, — 

" 1. That the first adventurers, settlers of this His Majesty's colony 
and dominion of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, brought with 
them and transmitted to their posterity, all privileges and immunities 
enjoyed by the people of Great Britain. 2. That by a charter of 
Chas. II. the Colony is entitled to all privileges of natural-born 
subjects. 3. That they have been governed by their own Assembly in 
the article of taxes and internal police. 4 to 6. That the General 
Assembly have the exclusive right to lay taxes and imposts, and 
that subjects are not bound to yield obedience to any other law or 
ordinance." 

R. Charles to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, September 21. Great Marlborough Street. — Has visited his 
Lordship for the purpose of conversing with him about the instruction 
to Sir Hy. Moore on the subject of appeals and a petition presented to 
the King by the Agent of New York. Transmits a memorial for a. 
grant of land in East Florida, to which he considers himself entitled. 
^Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Charles, Agent for New York. 

Constitutional Courant. 

1765, September 21. — No. 1. 2 copies. 
1 leaf each. 

b 2 



20 

Andrew Symmer to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1765, September 21. — Agrees with his Lordship that there could 
not have been a more unlucky time to impose a tax on America. No 
sensible North American denies his dependence on Britain, but he 
insists that the mode for raising money should have been left to their 
respective Governments. He believes that the Stamp Act is an ex- 
ceptionable duty and bears harder on some provinces than others, 
especially Virginia and Maryland. Remarks on trade with the West 
India Islands. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Andrew Symmer. Paper on American trade. Enumerates 
articles exported by America to the British West Indies, for 
which she receives rum. and sugar. Remarks on trade with 
French and Spanish West Indies, also the Danish and Dutch 
Islands. Government cannot take too vigorous steps to prevent 
the introduction of foreign European goods into the Colonies. 
Shows how trade in slaves is carried on in the American 
vessels. If encouraged, North America could supply the 
British, French, and Spanish West Indies with lumber and 
provisions much cheaper than can be done from Europe. 
Proposes some encouragements that might be given, and 
restrictions made to foreign vessels coming into British 
American ports. 

Autograph signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Symmer. 

The Boston Gazette and Country Journal. 

1765, September 23.— No. 547. 
1 sheet. 

The Boston Evening Post. 

1765, September 30.— No. 1568. 
1 sheet. 

Resolutions of a Congress held at New York. 

1765, October 1. — Composed of the Committees of the several 
Houses of Representatives of the British Colonies. Their opinion 
respecting the most essential rights and liberties of the Colonists, 
and the grievances under which they labour, because of recent Acts of 
Parliament. 

24 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Resolves of the Congress. 

Rev. Dr. Thomas Dampier to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, October 6. Eton. — Observations on Hasenclever and his iron 
manufactory in New York. Recommends him to Lord Dartmouth's 
notice as useful in giving information of America, and worthy of his 
confidence. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Iron. Rev. Dr. Dampier. 



21 

r 

Enclosure : — 

Peter Hasenclever to Dr. Thomas Dampier. 

17 '65, August 8. New York. — Private matters. Progress of his 
iron manufactory . Difficulties he has had to encounter with 
people and countries. Has started a hemp plantation upon 
the Mohawk river 300 miles above New York. (Considers that 
America is of more imptrrtance to England than people at home 
imagine, and the late restrictions on trade have hurt Britain 
much already, and time will show how erroneous they were. 
He has written to Lords Halifax, Hillsboro\ and Sandwich. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Note. — Dr. Dampier was at this time sub-master of Eton ; afterwards Dean of 
Durham; Bishop of Rochester 1802; of Ely 1808; died 1812. See other letters 
of his among the MSS. of R. W. Ketton, Esq., Twelfth Report, Appendix, Part IX., 
pp. 202-207. 

Meeting at Cambridge. 

176'), October 14. — "Newspaper cutting. Vote of a meeting of the free- 
holders and other inhabitants of Cambridge [Mass.]. William Brattle 
chosen Moderator. Representing the Stamp Act to be an infraction 
of their rights. If this Act takes place liberty will be no more, trade 
will languish and die, and poverty will be their portion. 

Messrs. Baynton, Wharton, and Morgan to the 
Reverend George Whitefield. 

1765, October 29. Philadelphia. — The desire of the Indians to have 
traders sent into their country. The cruel treatment shown to those 
sent, and the loss accruing to the merchants who supplied the goods. 
Have applied to the Board of Trade for relief and enclose copy of 
memorial to Sir William Johnson on same subject. Doctor Franklin 
is furnished with all particulars to represent this matter in England. 
Ask Whitefield to advocate with Lord Dartmouth on their behalf. 

Letter signed. ?>\ large pages. 

Endorsed: — Messrs. Bay n ton, Wharton, and Morgan of Philadelphia 
to Rev. Mr. W. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to Sir William Johnson. 

1765, February. Philadelphia. — [liobert] Callendar, John 
Baynton, Samuel Wharton, fyc, in behalf of themselves and 
others who lately traded with the Indian nations on the Ohio 
and to the westward. Desire compensation, in the shape of a 
proportionate grant of land, for their losses sustained through 
plunder by the Indians. 
Copy. l\ pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a memorial to Sir William Johnson, 
Baronet. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1765, October 23. — Fourteen Resolutions of the House of Repre- 
sentatives touching their rights of representation in connection with 
taxation. 

Printed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Boston Resolut, 29 Oct. 1765. 



22 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Newsletter. 

1765, October 31.— No. 3239. 
2 pages. 

New York. 

g 1 1765, November 2. — Charles Yorke and William de Grey. Report 
to the Board of Trade. 
Copy. 4l\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Report of His Majesty's Attorney and 
Solicitor-General on an Article in Governor of New York's 
Instructions, relative to appeals, dated November 2, 1765. 

John Smith to Lord Dartmouth. 

Not dated, but in a wrapper addressed to Lord Dartmouth, covering 
also a letter dated 3 November, on the funds of the East India 
Company. — Proposes means by which the national debt of America may 
be cancelled without Britain's help, i.e., by the improvement and selling 
of her improved lands. 

Autograph letter signed. 6^ quarto pages. 

John Smith to ... . 

Not dated, but in a wrapper addressed to Lord Dartmouth, covering 
also a letter dated 3 November, on the funds of the East India 
Company. — Hints on the produce and manufactures of America, and 
the duty she owes to Britain commercially. 

Autograph letter signed. 3f quarto pages. 



John Smith to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1765, November 5. London. — Proceedings in the Colonies owing to 
the Stamp Act. Many articles in the papers show an incendiary spirit. 
Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Jno. Smith, Nov r 5th, 1765, encloses American 
newspapers. 

Enclosure : — 

1765, September 30.— The Boston " Evening Post," No. 1568 
(part only). 
J sheet. 

Stamp Act. 

Paper of Intelligence, dated variously from 4 July to 5 November 
1765. Containing copies or extracts of letters relative to the Stamp 
Act. The letters are written from Trenton in New Jersey, 
5 November 1765 ; from Philadelphia, 1 November 1765 ; from 
Boston, 4 July 1765; from Philadelphia, 30 April and 11 October 
1765 ; from Boston, 17 June 1765. 

4 large folio pages. 



23 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

[1765], November 7. — Relative to Orders in Council of October 
1765. References to letters from Secretary Cooper, Lord Grafton, 
General Conway, Governor Fauquier, and the Governor of Georgia, on 
American affairs, and Governor Melville on West Indian matters. 

5 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Minutes and extracts of letters from Govr. Melville, 
&c, Nov. 7. 

Lieutenant-Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Adam 

Gordon. 

1765, November 7. Boston. — His distressed circumstances. The 
General Court has refused him relief. Has now applied to the King, 
and seeks Lord Gordon's assistance to obtain some compensation. 
Encloses copy of address from the Mohawk Indians to the King. 

Extract. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed ; — Extr. from Lt.-Gov. Hutchinson to L d Adam Gordon. 



Resolution of Merchants of Philadelphia. 

1765, November 7. Philadelphia. — Signed Samuel Mifflin, and 
addressed to Messrs. Richard Neave and Son, merchants, in London. 
To import no goods from Great Britain until the Stamp Act be 
repealed. Consequently, all orders given to Neave and Son for 
shipment of the same are countermanded. 

Printed form filled in. \ folio page. 

Endorsed : — Philadelphia. Resolution of merchants. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1765, November 8. Council Chamber. — Governor Francis Bernard. 
Speech to the House of Representatives and Council; with minutes 
of the 11th introducing it. Expostulates with them on their conduct 
towards him in consequence of the Stamp Act. 

Copy. 10 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a speech of Francis Bernard, Esq., Governor of 
Massachusets Bay, to the General Assembly of that Province, on 
the 8th of November 1765. 

1765, November 8. — Same as above. 
Printed. 1 page. 

Roger Hale to William Dowdeswell, Chancellor of 
His Majesty's Exchequer. 

1765, November 8. London. — In obedience to command, lays before 
him such observations as his residence in Boston in New England, 
while < 'ollector of His Majesty's Customs in that port, may have enabled 
him to make on the trade of the Northern Colonies and the laws 
affecting it. 

28 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Plan for America by Mr. Hale. 



24 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1765, November 6, 7, and 8. House of Representatives. — Extracts 
from Journal. Presentation of a report by the committee appointed to 
prepare a proper remonstrance to the Governor against the establish- 
ment of a new company at Castle William and the additional expense of 
116/. 17 s. Proceedings thereupon. 

15 J folio pages. 

Endorsed — Extracts from the Journal of the House of Representatives 
of Massachusetts Bay, on the 6, 7, and 7 (sic) of November 
1765. 

The Boston Gazette and Country Journal. 

1765, November 11. — No. 554. 
\ sheet. 

Thomas Cusuing and Samuel Adams to 



1765, November 11. Boston. — Letter beginning " Revd. Sir." 
Consider the Stamp Act an infringement of their constitutional rights. 
Complain of the duty put on molasses. Choice of De Berdt by the 
Massachusetts Assembly to present petitions to Parliament. 

Signed. In Adams's hand. & folio pages. 

Endorsed : — America, November 1765. 

Mr. Russel to Mr. [Dennys] De Berdt. 

1765, November 11. Charles Town, near Boston. — Commercial 
reasons why the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act should be repealed. 
Copy. 2^ large folio pages. 

Endorsed . — Mr. Russel to Mr. de Berdt, Charlestown, N. England, 
Nov. 11th, 1765. Copy. 

Treasury Minute. 

1765, November 15. — The export trade of Britain has suffered from 
the late orders and commissions given to commanders of His Majesty's 
ships stationed in the West Indies and America. After consideration 
it has been decided that bullion may be imported into the Colonies in 
foreign bottoms. 

2 1 folio pages, draft form. 

Endorsed : — Treasury Minute, 15 Nov r 1765. 

Governor Francis Bernard to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, November 16. Boston, N. E. — Congratulations on his 
Lordship's appointment as President of the Board of Trade. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. ( With seal.) 

Endorsed: — Governor Bernard. 

Talbot County, New England. 

1765, November 25. — Five resolutions of the Freemen. Consider 
the Stamp Act an infringement of their liberties. Will endeavour by 



25 

all means to preserve their rights and show their abhorrence of stamp 
officers. 

3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Resolutions of the Freemen of Talbot County in N. 
England, 25 Nov. 1765. 

Governor Francis Bernard to John Pownall. 

1765, November 26. Boston. — Proceedings in the town on the 5th 
of November. 

Extract. 5| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Francis Bernard, Esq., Gov. 
of Massachusets Bay, to John Pownall, Esq., Secry. to the Lords 
Commiss r3 for Trade and Plantations, dated Boston, Nov. 26, 1765. 

Joseph Manesty to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, November 26. London. — Has been over and traded with, for 
the past twenty years, many parts of Europe, all the West India 
Islands, and most of the North American plantations. In consequence 
of this, he is acquainted with many facts of a public and private nature 
which may be useful to his Lordship, so offers his services to him. 
Refers to his connections with John Newton, Lords Egremont and 
Hillsborough. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Manesty, Nov r 1765. 

Governor Francis Bernard to the Board of Trade. 

1765, November 30. Boston. — Transmitting and commenting upon 
the votes of the last session of the Assembly. 

Copy. 7^ folio pages. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, Massachusetts, Vol. 78, fol. 665.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from Governor Bernard to the Lords of 
Trade, dated Boston, November 30, 1765. 

1765, November 30. Boston. — Extract of the foregoing " Your 
Lordship will observe that in my Speech I recommend to the House 
to order a compensation to be made to the sufferers by the late 
disturbances.'' 

1 \ pages. 

New Jersey. 

1765, November 30. — Extracts from the votes of the Assembly of 
New Jersey against the Stamp Act. 

Two papers. 2 pages and § page respectively. 

Dennvs de Berdt to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 3. — Fatal consequences the late measures have had 
with regard to American trade. Advisability of preserving trade with 
the Spaniards. 

Letter signed. J large folio page. 



26 

Lieutenant-Governor Cadwallader Colden to 
Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 6. New York. — Sends the enclosed in a private 
"letter because some person has obtained copies of his letters to 
Dartmouth's predecessor and used them for malicious purposes. 

Autograph letter signed. If folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Lieutenant-Governor Colden. 

Enclosure : — 

1765, December 6. State of the Province of New York. — The 
people arc classed in four ranks: 1, the proprietors; 2, the 
gentlemen of the law : 3, the merchants ; 4, the farmers and 
mechanics. Narrates the share they have severally and unitedly 
taken in public transactions for thirty years past. 

\2\ folio pages. [Duplicate of this was sent to the Secretary 

of State, General Conway, and is in the Public Record 

Office, America and West Indies, Vol. 177, fol. 45. It 

is printed in full in the New York Colonial Documents, 

Vol. VII, p. 795.] 

Endorsed: — 6th December 1765. State of the Province of 
New York. 

Benjamin Hallowell to Sir Charles Knowles. 

1765, December 6. Boston. — [The signature is over another name 
carefully crossed through.] Refers him to the public papers to see the 
state of the country at this time, and to the enclosure for the quantity 
of American subjects to be governed. Gives his opinion of the Stamp 
Act. The expenses to which Massachusetts has been put since its 
settlement. Remarks on Crown lands, and the settlement made last 
summer by Coit and Smith. 

Copy. 4 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Letter to Sir Charles Knowles, Boston, December 1765. 

Enclosure : 

1765, December 6. Boston. [Benjamin Hallowell. ] Com- 
putation of inhabitants in the T3 provinces of North America. 
Copy. 1 j large folio pages. 

Note. — Rear Admiral Sir Charles Knowles, governor of Cape Breton 1746 ; of 
Jamaica 17.02-8 ; chief president of the admiralty to the Empress of Russia 1770; 
died December 1777. 

Private Memorandum Book of Lord Dartmouth. 

Containing notes on Parliamentary affairs, Colonial affairs, and other 
items, from 17 July to 17 December 1765. 
Autograph. 32 octavo pages (paper cover). 

Lieutenant-Governor Francis Fauquier to Lord Dartmouth, 
First Lord Commissioner for Trade and Plantation Affairs, &c, in 
London. 

1765, December 17. Williamsburgh. — Congratulations upon his 
appointment to the Board of Trade. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Lt.-Gov r Fauquier. 



27 

The King's Speech. 

N. D. [1765, December 17.] — Draft for the King's speech to Parlia- 
ment. Not dated, but from reference to the Journals of the House of 
Commons believed to be of this date. 

H folio pages. 

House of Lords to the King. 

[1765, December about 18th.] — Address. Return thanks for the 
speech from the throne. Congratulations on the birth of a prince. 
American affairs. 

Draft. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Address. 

Samuel Adams to John Smith. 

1765, December 19. Boston. — Addressed, on a wrapper containing 
also a letter of 20 December, to John Smith, Esq., in London, per 
favour of Eev. Mr. Whittaker. Complains of the injustice of the 
Stamp Act, and the restrictions on trade. States what he considers 
the rights of free subjects of Britain, and shows how the Stamp Act is 
contrary to' these. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Adam of Boston to Mr. Smith. Dec 1 * 1765. State 
of British Colonies in America. 

Reverend J. William Giberne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 19. Sabine Hall, in Richmond County, on Rappa« 
hanock River, Virginia. — Congratulations upon his Lordship's recent 
appointment. Grateful remembrances of past favours. The writer's 
present condition suffers from the distress of the Colony. 

Autograph fetter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Rev. Mr. Giberne. 

Samuel Adams to John Adams. 

1765, [December] 20. Boston. — Proceedings of the Colonies on 
the proposal of the Stamp Act and after the passing of the Act. 
Insults shown to stamp officers and account of the disturbances on 
26 August, when the nouses of Mr. Story (Deputy Registrar of the 
Vice-Admiralty Court), Mr. Hallowell (Comptroller of Customs), and 
Lieutenant-Governor Hutchinson were attacked. Opposition to the 
Stamp Act daily increases and reconciliation to it seems an impossibility. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed with his letter of the previous dap. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1765, December 20. — Mention letters from the Governor of New 
Jersey, 10 October 1765, and Governor of Virginia 2 October 1765. 
Other minutes refer to trade with Portugal. 

1% folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Minutes, December 20, Portugal. 



28 

Samuel Garbett to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 21. Birmingham. — Addressed, on a wrapper covering 
also a letter of 24 December, to the Earl of Dartmouth, Saint James's 
Square, London. Stating the facts that will be presented at an ap- 
proaching meeting of the merchants interested in the trade to America, 
showing the inconveniences and ruinous consequences ensuing from the 
countermanding of orders for America. Advises strongly the repeal of 
the Stamp Act. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. Sealed. 

Endorsed: — Mr, S. Garbett, Berming m . State of manufact 9 . 

Enclosures : — 

1765, December 6. London. — Barlow Trecothick, chairman to 
the Committee of the Merchants of London trading to North 
America, to the Chief Magistrate of Birmingham, Acquaints 
him with the proceedings of the merchants of this city with 
regard to trade with America. Asks for his help in making 
application to Parliament for relief . 
Copy. 1 large folio page. 

1765, December 21. Birmingham. — Samuel Garbett, Joseph 
Wilkinson, and eighteen others, to [Barlow Trecotluck"]. Em- 
barrassment of merchants here in consequence of icant of 
remittances from, and stoppage of trade with America. 
Thousands of labourers will soon be clamorous for employment 
and subsistence. Will soon present some facts to help to remove 
the blow given to this trade. 
Copy. 1 large folio page 

Henry Kennan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 23. Clutched Friars. — Has given particular attention 
to the silk culture of South Carolina and Georgia. This culture by no 
means answers the expectations formed of it, and has annually declined. 
Considers, however, it could be made successful under better regulations, 
and with less expense to Government. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Georgia, Filature. Mr. Kennan. 

Samuel Garbett to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 24. Birmingham. — A committee has been nominated 
to deliver a sketch of a petition to Parliament, and a letter to all the 
nobility likely to favour such. Merchants agree with him in the 
sentiments expressed in his letter of 21st instant. 

Autograph letter signed. I quarto page. 

Henry Kennan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 31. Crutched Friars. — Respecting the silk culture 
in Georgia and South Carolina. Some private gentlemen are willing 
to take the filature in Savannah into their own hands, paying one 
shilling for each pound of cocoons. Remarks on the bounty given by 
Government to this culture. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 



29 

Enclosure : — 

Paper showing the expense of the silk culture in South Carolina 
and Georgia in 1762, 1763, and 1764. 
Autograph. 1 quarto page. 

The Duke of Newcastle to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765, December 31. Newcastle House. — Has heard that an appli- 
cation has been received by the Board of Trade from the Representatives 
of the Colonies. Asks that a copy may be transmitted to him. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Duke of Newcastle, 31 Dec. 1765. 

Dennys de Berdt to the Earl op Halifax. 

N. D. [1765]. — The recent regulations concerning American trade 
have caused hardships to that country, and are detrimental to Great 
Britain. Shows how, if put into force, they will operate on English 
commerce. 

Copy. 3£ large folio pages, 

Dennys de Berdt to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1765]. — Gives extract from a letter of William Donaldson of 
New York, showing the distress of the country through want of money ; 
the hindrances to commerce, if continued, will ruin America, and 
England will feel the effects. Remarks on the debt of six millions 
which America now owes England. 

Letter signed. 1J large folio pages. 

Bullion in Foreign Bottoms. 

N. D. [1765]. — Observations on the commerce of our Colonies with 
those of Spain, so far as regards the legality of the importation of 
bullion in foreign bottoms. Several reports to the Board of Trade and 
others are annexed, dated 1708 and 1720. 

22£ folio pages, 

N. D, [1765]. — Proposal to allow the importation of bullion into 
the Colonies in foreign bottoms. 

In Lord Dartmouth's hand, 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Proposal to allow the importation of bullion into the 
Colonies in foreign bottoms. Proposal. 

N. D. [1765]. — Considerations on the laws made for the increase of 
navigation, and for the regulation of the plantation trade, so far as they 
relate to bullion. 

In Lord Dartmouth's hand. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Considerations on the Acts of Trade and Navigation, so 

far as relates to bullion. 
Again endorsed : — Observations, &c. 



30 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N. D. [1765], — On letters from Governors Fauquier, Bernard, Colden, 
Franklin, Sharpe, Wentworth, and General Gage, in June, August, 
September, October, and November, concerning the state of affairs in 
their respective provinces with regard to the arrival and distribution of 
stamps. 

6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Governors letters to Sec. of State. 

Mr. Fuller's Plan of Accommodation. 

N. D. [1765]. — Reasons why Britain should not tax the Colonies. 
Proposes repeal of all the Revenue Acts, and the establishment of land 
taxes on the same principles as in England, also duties on foreign 
goods imported. 

1^ folio pages. 

Captain Francis Legge to General Seymodr Conwaf, 
Secretary of State. 

N. D. [1765]. — Memorial. In view of his long services desires 
permission to dispose of his commission. 

1 quarto page. With an account of his endeavours to purchase a 
majority in the Royal Americans. (2\ quarto pages.) 

Endorsed : — The memorial of Captain Francis Legge, 46th Reg nt . 

New York Assembly. 

1765. — Extract from the Journal. Twelve resolutions stating their 
allegiance, but representing their great objection to the Stamp Act, as 
it deprives them of their constitutional rights. 

6^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract from the Journal of the Assembly at New York, 
1765. 

New York Gazette. 

N. D. [1765]. — Extracts, Preservation of the Colony of Connecticut. 
Agreement of the inhabitants of America not to receive stamps. Intel- 
ligence from Boston acquaints of the other colonies holding with the 
petition of the seven colonies. Vessels clearing out at Rhode Island. 

I page. 

Endorsed: — Extracts from the New York Gazette. 

James Otis. 

N. D. [1765]. — Extracts from the Vindication of the British Colonies, 
&c , said to be by James Otis. Boston, 1765. 
In Lord Dartmouth's hand. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extracts from Vind. of the Br. Colonies, <fcc. 

John Smith to Lord Dartmouth. 

1765. — Remarks on the right of Britain to lay internal taxes on 
American Colonies. The grievances arising from the Stamp Act. Pro- 



31 

poses other means to raise a revenue, that is, several articles to be 
taxed, and the improvement of ceded lands, &c. 
Autograph letter signed. 14 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Smith, of Boston, 1765. 

Enclosures : — 

Extracts from the Charters of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode 
Island, and Maryland, with Reference to Taxation. Beginning 
"Massachusetts was first given by James ye \st in the \%th 
year of his reign" 

Autograph. ?>\ quarto pages. 

Paper on the Question of the Right of Britain to tax her Colonies. 
Shows the inherent right of the Colonies to tax themselves, and 
indicates the laws expressed in the respective charters for that 
purpose. 

Autograph. 11 J quarto pages. 

Assembly of South Carolina to Charles Garth, 

N. D. [1765 J. — Consequences which will ensue from the non-repeaL 1 
of certain Acts. Remarks upon the advantages which might be gained 
from the Colonies if Great Britain withdrew her arbitrary and oppressive 
measures. 

Extract. 6-§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from the Assembly of South Carolina 
to Charles Garth, Esq., their Agent. 

Stamp Act. 

1765. — Paper containing abstracts of letters and enclosures received, 
by or communicated to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and 
Plantations relative to the Stamp Act. The letters are from 
Lieutenant-Governor Fauquier, 5 June 1765 ; Governor Bernard, 
8 July, 15, 22 and 31 August, 7 and 28 September ; Governor Franklin, 
10 October; Governor Wentworth, 5 October; Governor Bernard, 
1, 12, 17, 19, and 26 October, and 1 November; Lieutenant-Governor 
Fauquier, 2 October ; Governor Wilmot, 19 November j Lieutenant- 
Governor Fauquier, 3 November. 

§6\ folio pages. 

1765. — List of the letters and papers of the foregoing entry. 
8 J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — List of papers received by or communicated to the Lords 
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, so far as they relate to 
or contain any information of the riots that have happened in 
America in opposition to the putting in execution the Stamp Act. 
since the passing thereof to the present time. 

The Duke op Newcastle to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 2. Claremont. — Returns papers on the subject of 
American taxation. Gives his opinion. Thinks the only person to be 
consulted is Mr. Onslow, and hopes His Lordship will see him. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Duke of Newcastle, 2 Jan. 1766. 



32 

Samuel Garbett to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 4. Birmingham. — Sending the enclosed. 
Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— -Mr. S. Garbett, Petition to Pari*. 

Enclosure : — 

Merchants, &c, of Birmingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 4. — With their proposed petition to the House of 

Commons. Desire His Lordship may make such use of the 

facts relative to the stagnation of trade with America as may 

prevent the frightful consequences which must ensue from so 

many necessitous workmen being suddenly unemployed. 

Letter signed. If pages. 

General Phineas Lyman to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 7. London. — Thoughts on the Act of Parliament 
establishing a stamp duty in America. 
Letter signed. 6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Gen. Lyman on the Stamp Act. 

Joseph Manesty to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 8. London, Copt Hall Court, Throgmorton Street. — 
Sends enclosure. Would be glad to be of any use to His Lordship. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Manesty. 

Enclosure : — 

1766, January 1. London. — Observations on the cause of the 
disturbances with America, its trade and exported products. 
Original, not signed. 19 folio pages. 

< 

The King's Speech to Parliament. 

[1766, January 14.] Not dated, but from reference to the Commons' 
Journals believed to be of this date. — The important proceedings in 
America demand their serious attention. 

2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Speech, 

House of Lords to the King. 

[1766, January 14.] — Address. 

Draft, with corrections in Lord Dartmouth's hand. 1J pages. 

Endorsed : — Address, 

Peter Hasenclever to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 15. New York. — By advice of the Rev d Dr. Dampier 
takes this liberty and gives a short account of the present situation of 



33 

affairs in this country, and of the injurious effect ou American trade 
caused by the Acts of Parliament lately passed. 
Autograph letter signed. 10|- quarto pages. 

Endorsed. — Mr. Hasenclever, New York, 15 January 1766. 

Governor Sir Henry Moore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 16. New York. — Announcing the forcible boarding 
of a ship just arrived from England and the seizure and burning of the 
stamped paper. 

Duplicate letter signed. 2 pages. 

Enclosure : — 

1766, January 10, II, and 14. Fort George, New York. — 

Minutes of Council. The Governor's remonstrance on the 

proceedings of the 8th ; he lays before them Secretary Conway's 

letter insisting on the execution of the Act. Copy certified by 

G. Banyar, 18 February 1766. 

8f pages. 

Endorsed: — New York, 10, 11, and 14 January 1766. 
Minutes of Council, on burning the stamp papers. 

General Phineas Lyman to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 18. London. — Facts which render the Stamp Act 
most distressing to the Americans. Reasons why the British Par- 
liament should not lay internal taxes on their Colonies. 

Letter signed. 41 quarto pages. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, January 24, Friday. — Partly concerning Senegambia. Repre- 
sentation on behalf of Governor Boone. Memorial of Charles Garth, 
Agent for South Carolina. 

1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Min. Jan 24 1766. Senegambia, Carolina. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, January 27 and 30. — Concerning various papers relating to 
America. Acc'ount of the annual expenses of government in America. 
Account of the debts of the several provinces. Order of the Duke of 
Grafton to prepare lists of civil and military officers employed in North 
America. 

3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — January 27, 1766. Bermuda. 

The Earl of Huntingdon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, January 29, Wednesday, eight o'clock, Donnington Park. — 
Sends his proxy. Knowing Dartmouth's attachment to the laws of 
equity upon which his (Huntingdon's) zeal for the repeal of the Stamp 
Act is founded, his vote may be employed as Dartmouth thinks proper. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :^Earl of Huntingdon, 29th January 1766. 
y 82140. C 



34 

Stamp Act. 

N. D. [1766, about January]. — Paper headed, " The Measures which 
Parliament shall adopt in respect to the present distracted State of 
America will determine whether Great Britain shall be the greatest 
and most powerful Nation in the World, or shall crumble away to 
Nothing." 

Unsigned. 3| folio pages. 

Endorsed : — America. 

N.D. [1766, about January]. — Paper headed, "The following Pro- 
positions and Observations upon them are the Result of a dispassionate 
and unprejudiced Reflection upon the unhappy Consequences produced 
by the American Stamp Act of last Year." 

Unsigned. 7^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Propositions and Observations relating to the Stamp 
Act. 

[Thomas Crowley] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, February 1. Grace Church Street. — Signed "Amor Patriffi." 
Offers suggestions upon the repeal of the Stamp Act. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Crowle, America. 

Enclosures : — 

Calculation of the supposed number of inhabitants in each of the 
American colonies and the proportion of money to raise. 
Original. \\ quarto pages. 

[1766, about] January 1.] [Thomas Crowley.] Paper signed 
" Amor Patrice" addressed " To the Printer." Proposes an 
expedient, as a medium rchereby to reconcile the mistakes which 
have unfortunately happened on both sides of the question. 
Printed strip. 2 copies. 

Joseph Manesty to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, February 3. London. — Unhappy state of America in con- 
sequence of the Stamp Act. Advocates its repeal and makes a suggestion 
which he thinks would be generally accepted. 

Autograph letter signed. 3J pages. 

Endorsed .—Mr. Manesty, Feb. 3, 1766. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, February 5. — With reference to letters received that day from 
governors in America. 
3 J- pages. 

Dennys de Berdt to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, February 7. " Friday, 4 Clock." — Sending the following.. 
Autograph letter signed. \ quarto page. 
Endorsed .—Mr. De Berdt, Feby. 7, 1766. 



35 

Annexed : — 

Extract of a letter jrom Charles Town, dated 21 December 1765. 
Hopes the unjustifiable lengths into which the Americans are 
gone loill not be laid to the town of Boston which has publicly 
condemned such proceedings. 
\ quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

1765, December 20. Boston. — James Otis, Thomas Cushing t 
Samuel Adams, and Thomas Gray — -four members of the 
Massachusetts Assembly — to Denny s de Berdt. Setting forth 
the disadvantages arising to America by the several Acts of 
Parliament lately made, and the rights to which they hold 
themselves entitled, especially the right of representation. 
Letter signed. %\ pages. 



Stamp Act. 

t 1766, February 10.— Cutting from the " Daily Advertiser," No. 1 1,518, 
containing a letter signed "A Lover of Britain " with some correspon- 
dence dated 1754, showing the sentiments of Americans at that time on 
the subject of a parliamentary tax. 
Printed. \ leaf. 



House of Commons. 

N. D. [about 1766, February 10], — Five proposed Resolutions for a 
Committee. Condemning the tumults and insurrection lately raised in 
America in manifest violation of the authority of this kingdom. 

Manuscript corrected in Lord Dartmouth' s hand. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Resolves proposed. 



Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, February 13 and 14. ^ 

1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .—Feb. 13 & 14, 1766, Nova Scot. Georgia Silk 
Culture. 



Sons op Liberty. 

1766, February 14. New York. — Thomas Robinson, Isaac Sears, 
John Lamb, William Willey, and Gersham Mott, Committee of the 
Sons of Liberty. Circular letter. To assemble as many of the true 
sons of liberty as possible immediately upon the receipt of this, and 
proposes an association iu order to form a union of the Colonies and to 
draw up such resolves as will be most efficacious for the preservation of 
liberty. 

Copy. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a circulary letter sent through the Southern 
Colonies directed to different people. 

c 2 



36 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, February 18 and 19. 
1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— -Feb. 18, 1766. E. & W. Florida. 

John Scott to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, February 19. Philadelphia. — On the deplorable state of affairs 
in New York on account of the Stamp Act. 
Autograph letter signed, 3| pages. 

Endorsed:— -Mr. Scott, Philadelphia. Feb. 1766. 

The Earl of Chesterfield to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, February 20. — Expresses his abhorrence of the Stamp Act. 
Begs Lord Dartmouth to accept his proxy. 
Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Earl of Chesterfield. 20 Feby. 1766. 

Christopher Gadsden to James Pearson. 

1766, February 20. Charles Town. — Preceded by an autograph 
copy of a previous letter of 13 February. 

(13 February.) — They are anxiously waiting the result of Parliament 
with regard to recent Acts. They have considered the Stamp 
Act and others, and are more averse to them than ever. Evil 
consequences that will ensue if the Act is not repealed. 

20 February. — Warns against the Sc h representations from 

this place. Resolution of rice planters. Hopes which have been 
entertained that the Stamp Act would be repealed. Remarks as to how 
this will affect European Powers, and on the injustice of the tax. 
Autograph letter signed. 8§ pages. 

Endorsed:— Charles Town. S. Car. 13 Feb. 1766. 

Enclosure : — 

1766, February 3. — Minutes of the South Carolina House of 
Assembly. Relative to the opening of the ports in that 
province. 

Charles Town, printed by Peter Timothy. 7^ pages. 

Governor Sir Henry Moore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, February 22. New York. — Touching a present which the 
Assembly has resolved to make him. 
Duplicate letter signed. 2J pages. 

Endorsed:— Sr H. Moore, N. York. 22 Feb. 1766. 

Grey Elliott to [Doctor Campbell]. 

1766, February 24. Savannah, in Georgia. — In favour of Mr. Bowen, 
who is acquainted with the method of making sago, &c. 

With this letter is a paper containing certilicates of Governor Wright 
and President Habersham, 11 February, and declaration of Samuel 



37 

Bowen, 12 February 1766, in recommendation of the samples of salop 
powder and vermicelli made by him in Georgia. [See duplicates in the 
Marquis of Lansdowne's MSS. Fifth Report, Appendix, p. 218]. 
Autograph letter signed^ \ 'page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Bo wen's testimonials from Dr. Campbell. 
Again endorsed : — From Dr. Campbell. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, Tuesday, February 25. 
1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Feb. 25, 1766. Carolina, Grenada, Leghorn, Silks. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's hand. 

1766, Thursday, February 27. — Refers to two estimates of surveys, 
one from Mr. Holland, the other from Mr. de Brahm. 
J quarto page. 

The Duke of Manchester to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, March 2. — Mr. Williamos has a great knowledge of America, 
so hopes that he will not be totally laid aside. 
Autograph letter signed, 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Duke of Manchester. 2 March 1766. 



Petitions of London Merchants. 

1766, March 5. — Merchants of London trading to North America. 
Petitions to the House of Lords and the House of Commons representing 
the'r apprehensions of utter ruin unless Parliament interposes to save 
the country's commerce and revenue. The repeal of the Stamp Act 
would be of the greatest value. 

Not signed. 2 pages and 2\ pages. 

Endorsed: — Petitions of the merchants of London to the two House[sl 
of Pari* Mch 5, 1766. 



General Henry Seymour Conway to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, March 10, Monday morning. Little Warwick Street. — Has 
perused three inclosed letters from Governor Bernard, dated 18, 19, and 
21 December 1765, with enclosures. 

In the third person. £ quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Sec. Conway. March 10, 1766. 

The Duke of Grafton to [Lord Dartmouth] 

1766, March 10. Grosvenor Square. — Thinks it will be necessary to 
have Bernard's dispatch of 16 January copied out for the House. The 
papers that are to prove the wording of the bill ought to be found. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:—!), of Grafton. March 10, 1766. 



Resolution of London Merchants. 

1766, March 10. — Agreement made at a meeting of the Committee' 
of the West Indian and North American merchants held at the " King's 
Arms " Tavern. Reduction of duty on molasses. Prohibition of rum. 
Rules for importation and consumption of several articles in North 
America. 

1| pages. 

Endorsed : — West India and North American Merchants Agreement. 
Examined. 

1766, March 10. — Copy of the foregoing. 
Endorsed ;— Resolution of Merchants. 



Thomas Crowley to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, March 14. Grace Church Street. — Is the author of the 
letter signed % \ Amor Patriae." Remarks on the advisability of having a 
well-formed method for better uniting and strengthening the mutual 
interest and peace of Great Britain and her Colonies. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ pages. 

Endorsed :— My. Crowley, 14 March 1766. 

Enclosure : — 

1766, March 3. — The Controversy between Great Britain and 
her Colonies briefly analysed. Signed " Amor Patrice." 
Printed. 1 page. 



Act to secure the Dependence of America upon the 

Crown. 

N. D. [1766, about March 18]. — An Act for the better securing the 
Dependency of His Majesty's Dominions in America upon the Crown 
and Parliament of Great Britain. 

Manuscript. 1§ pages. 

Endorsed : — Bill for securing the Dependency of the Colonies'in 
America. 



Presbyterian Church in New York to the Moderator and 
Members of the Assembly of the Church op Scotland. 

1766, March 18. New York. — Memorial and Petition. Briefly 
recounting the rise, progress, and present state of the Church. 
Soliciting the help of the venerable Assembly in obtaining a charter 
of incorporation for them. They have also applied to Mr. Dennis 
Debert and Doctor Samuel Chandler to make and solicit their application 
for the royal order. 

Copy. 12| pages. 

Endorsed: — To the Reverend & Honourable the Moderator and 
Members of the Venerable Assembly of the Church of Scotland. 

The Memorial & Petition of the Presbyterian Church in the 
City of New York. Copy. 



39 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, March 27. Gerard Street. — Proposals for putting an end 
to the illicit trade carried on between Great Britain and Holland. 
Letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— My. Bollan, 27th March 1766. 



Thomas Crowley to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, March 28. Grace Church Street. — Transmits four letters from 
J. D. Hammerer, who has gone to America with the view of civilising 
and educating the Indians and their children. He has been at con- 
siderable expense, and requires money to carry his plan more fully into 
execution. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed:— Mr. Tho 3 Crowley, 28 Mch. 1766. 



Henry Seymour Conway to Governor Francis Bernard.. 

1766, March 31. St. James's. — With Governor Bernard's speech to 
the Council and House of Representatives of Massachusetts Bay, 3 June, 
communicating the letter. Transmits copies of Acts for securing the 
Dependency of the Colonies and for repealing the Stamp Duties. 
Expects shortly to send a third for the indemnity of such persons as 
have received the penalties imposed by the Act just repealed. Extols 
the care of His Majesty for his Colonies, and the lenity and indulgence 
of the Parliament. A revision of the late America Trade Laws is to 
be the immediate object of Parliament. Most earnestly requires that 
he exert himself in recommending to the Assembly that full and ample 
compensation be made to those who have suffered for their deference 
to Acts of the British Legislature. Hopes he will be particularly 
attentive that such persons be effectually secured from any further 
insult. 

Cutting from a printed paper. 1 page. 

Endorsed [with two other printed papers, Massachusetts Bay 
Representatives' Addresses of 3 and 9 June] : — Gov r Barnard's 
Speeches to the Assembly. 



Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, March 31. — Concerning letters from Sir Henry Moore in 
January and February, from Governor Wright and others. 
3£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—Kg., 31 March 1766. 



Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

1766, April 2. — Concerning a letter from Governor Pallisser to 
Mr. Pownall, 31 March, a letter from Governor Lyttleton to the Board, 
29 December 1765, and petitions for land in America. 

\ quarto page. 



40 

Edward Smith to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, April 6. Chavy. — By the request of his brother, offers his 
sentiments upon the effect a repeal of the stamp duty may have in 
America. 

Autograph letter signed. 6 pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr, Edward Smith, April 6th, 1766. Repeal of 
American Stamp Act. 

Right Honourable Charles Townshend to [Lord 

Dartmouth], 

1766, April 9. Gr. Sq. — Apologises for reminding him of the petition 
subscribed by Lord Adam Gordon, himself, and Mr. Kinlock, for a 
grant of lands in East Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Right Honourable Charles Townshend, 9 April 1766. 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, April 14. Gerard Street. — Refers to a letter he wrote to the 
Board of Trade in 1742, concerning the illicit trade carried on between 
the Northern Colonies and Holland, and the proposals he has made for 
the better execution of the laws for securing the plantation trade. 
Desires an interview in order to explain his proposals for putting an end 
to the Dutch illicit trade. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Bollan, 14 April 1766. 

Lieutenant-Governor Thomas Hutchinson to his son 
[query Elisha or Thomas]. 

1766, April 18. Milton. — Does not expect the House of Repre- 
sentatives will make any compensation to the sufferers. If New York 
should comply, possibly the people here may follow. 

Autograph copy. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a lr. from Lt.-Gr. Hutchinson to his son, dated 
Milton, 18 April 1766. 

The Bishop of London to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, April 18. Bond Street.— (Signed "Ric. London.") Will 
appoint a bishop to ordain deacons and priests intended for America. 
Autograph letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Bp. of London. April 1766. 

Manufactures in the Colonies. 

1766, April 25. — Hints for the prevention of the establishment of 
manufactures in the Colonies. Suggests the granting of lands and 
better privileges. 

2 pages. 

Endorsed : — Hints presented 25 April 1 766. 



41 

Major Thomas Mant to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, April 30. — Encloses the paper he mentioned concerning Detroit, 
which he hopes will convince his Lordship that the King has a right to 
dispose of the lands surrounding it. 

Autograph letter signed. \ page. 

Enclosure : — 

Major Thomas ManVs proposal for a settlement at Detroit. 
Refers to a memorial previously sent, to which was added a 
description of Detroit, its soil, produce, fyc, which he now gives 
again, showing the desirability of establishing a settlement 
there. 

20 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Major Manfs Proposal for a settlement at 
Detroit. 

Note — Served under General Bradstreet ; author of " The History of the Late War 
in North America, and the Islands of the West Indies, including the Campaigns of 
1763 and 1764 against his Majesty's Indian Enemies," published in London in 
1772; engaged in extensive agricultuial operations in France, and was afterwards 
imprisoned in Paris for debt 

Governor Sir Henry Moore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, April 30. Fort George, New York. — The steps he is taking 
to secure an exact return of all the quit rents of the Province. 

Duplicate letter signed. 8| pages. [The original is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 38, fo. 97.] 

Endorsed:— Sv Henry Moore, N. York. 30 April 1766. 

Stamp Act. 

1766, May I. — Extract of a letter from Joseph Reed at Tunton 
[? Trenton]. " Should Mr. Grenville's fatal Policy prevail, the friendly 
intercourse between Great Britain and her colonies will soon drop." 
He will receive news of their deliverance with the most sincere 
gratitude and joy. To this is added an extract of another letter from 
John Rhea at Philadelphia of the same date. " The Repeal of the 
Stamp Act and redress of other Grievances will be Cause of rejoicing 
to the Americans." Hopes care will be taken to prevent reflections 
and exultations. Doubts not but that a little time will convince the 
mother country that they are not undutiful or ungrateful children. 
Hopes the good advice of the Committee of merchants to their committee 
will be followed. 

^ page and | page. 

Lieutenant-Governor William Bull to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, May 8. Charlestown. — " On the 24 of last month Lord Hope 
arrived in this province." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Lt.-Govr. Bull. 

Dr. John Fothergill to Dr. Templeman. 

1766, May 21. London. — Concerning the result of some experiments 
he has made upon sago prepared from the produce of Georgia by 



42 

Mr. Bowen who he c6nsiders is entitled to a recompense proportionate 
to his discovery. 

Letter signed. 2J pages. 

Endorsed: — Dr. Fothergill concerning Mr. Bowen's powder. 



Massachusetts Gazette Extraordinary. 

1766, Thursday, May 29. — Containing Governor Francis Bernard's 
speech to the General Assembly, 29 May, and proceedings of a meeting 
for the election of Councellors. 

Printed. 1 page. 



William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, May 30. Gerard Street. — Information he has received con- 
cerning an increased illicit trade carried on between Holland and New 
York. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Bollan, recommended by Sr G. Savile. 



Reverend J. William Giberne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, May 30. Sabine Hall, Richmond, Virginia. — Expresses the 
admiration of the Americans for the Earl of Dartmouth. Festivities on* 
account of the repeal of the Stamp Act. Colonel Randolph intends 
sending a young eaglet with a pair of summer ducks. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

With this is placed an autograph draft of Lord Dartmouth's reply, 
not dated, expressing his pleasure at the confidence of the Virginians in 
the integrity of the present administration, and acknowledging receipt of 
the eagle. 

Endorsed : — Rev. Mr. Giberne, Virginia. 30 May 1766. 



[New York Sons of Liberty.] 

1766, May 31. New York.— Circular. " With Hearts elated on the 
great and important occasion, we, in behalf of the united Sons of Liberty 
here," : — Congratulations on repeal of the Stamp Act. Thanks for 
co-operation in the glorious cause. 

Copy. H pages. 



J. Tudway to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 2. Wimple Street. — Recommends a young man who 
is desirous of gaining a competent maintenance in any part of America 
or elsewhere. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Tudway. 



43 

Massachusetts Bay House of Representatives to [Governor 

Francis Bernard]. 

Voted in the House of Representatives, Boston, June 3, 1766. — 
Address in answer to his speech communicating the Secretary of State's 
letter of 31 March. Upon the repeal of the Stamp Act. 

L printed page. 

William Brattle to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 4. Boston. — Sets forth the allegiance of the province,, 
and explains the late proceedings. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :■ — America, 1766. 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 9. Gerard Street. — Encloses a letter on the subject of 
supplying masts for the navy. Having since collected facts and papers 
which have been laid before his Lordship and the Board, is now ready 
to attend to give an oral explanation whenever convenient. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .—Mr. Bollan, June 9, 1766. 

Enclosure : — 

1763, March 29. Leicester Square. — William Bollan to 
]. Proposals for securing from America a 
perpetual supply of masts for the Royal Navy. 
Copy. 2J quarto pages. 

Massachusetts Bay House of Representatives to [Governor 

Francis Bernard]. 

Voted in the House of Representatives, Boston. June 9, 1766. — 
Address in further answer to his speech of the 3rd inst. 
Printed. 2 columns. 

Captain Gavin Cochbane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 10. London. — Account of his proceedings with reference 
to the repairing of the forts in South Carolina and Georgia in 1764,. 
and of the country through which he passed on his way from Charlestown 
to Savannah. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — 1st. [For other endorsement, see his letter of 27 June.]j 

Captain Gavin Cochrane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 11. London. — His journey from Savannah to Augusta. 
Description of Augusta. Building of Fort Charlotte Visit he paid' 
the French settlement of New Bordeaux in Hillsborough township 
and Fort Prince George in the Cherokee country. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — 2d. [For other endorsement, see his letter of 27 June- 
1766.] 



44 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 13. Gerard Street. — Sending the enclosed. 
Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

Brief observations respecting the perpetual supply of masts for 
the royal navy. 
1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Brief observa s respecting the perpet 1 supply of 
masts for the royal navy. 

An abstract of several Acts of Parliament made for the impor- 
tation of masts and other naval stores from the Colonies, and 
for the preservation of the white and other pine trees. 
Original not signed. 3§ quarto pages. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N.D. [1766, about June 13]. — On American timber for masts. The 
two chief places whence it can be obtained are New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts Bay. 

Autograph. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — American masts. 

Merchants of Lancaster to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 13. Lancaster. — Express their grateful sentiments on 
the repeal of the Stamp Act. 

Letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Merchants of Lancaster. 13 June 1766. 

Captain Gavin Cochrane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 14. London. — The Indian trade is carried on by the 
people of South Carolina with the Cherokees, and by Georgia with the 
Creeks. The commanding officer at Fort Prince George constantly has 
a great deal of Indian business in his hands, and corresponds with 
Mr. Stuart and the Governor. Orders he (Cochrane) gave to Mr. Price. 
The province appeared satisfied that he had its interest at heart. Obser- 
vations on the repairing of the Fort and its situation. Information 
about the Cherokee Indians. u What I have further to communicate to 
your Lordship I propose to comprehend in two more letters ; in one the 
Abuses of Indian traders & others going into the Indian Country, of 
which Reports were made to me And in my other letter give a short 
Account of the Visit I paid the Island of Frederica last Summer ; and 
trouble your Lordship with my observations on the Climate and Soil of 
South Carolina and Georgia. But before I proceed further I will do 
myself the honour to wait of your Lordship to know if what I have 
already troubled you with has any ways contributed to your enter- 
tainment; And if I have been too superficial, or what is more likely, too 
particular ; that I may shun these faults in my other letters." 

Autograph letter signed. 3£ quarto pages. 



45 

Colonel John Randolph to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, June 15. Williamsburg, Virginia. — Concerning a young eagle 
and other birds he is sending his lordship. 
Autograph letter signed, 1 quarto page. 

On the reverse of the letter is a draft of Lord Dartmouth's reply, 
not dated, returning thanks for the birds. 

Endorsed : — Col 1 Randolph, Virginia June 15 1766. 

Thomas Cushing, Speaker, to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 21. Boston, New England.— Transmitting, by order of 
the Massachusetts Bay House of Representatives, the enclosed vote of 
thanks. 

Letter signed. Sealed wrapper. 1 quarto page. 

With this is placed an autograph draft of Lord Dartmouth's reply, 
not dated, thanking the House for the honour done him. 

Endorsed ;— Th 3 Cushing, Speaker of the House of Represent. 
Massachusets' Bay 21 June 1766. 

Enclosure : — 

In the House of Representatives, June 20, 1766. — Vote of thanks 
of Massachusetts Bay House of Representatives. 
True copy, § quarto page. 

Henry Kennan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 26. Crutched Fryars. — Containing proposals concerning 
the culture of silk in Georgia. 

Autograph letter signed. 2± pages. 

Endorsed: — To Lord Dartmouth. Mr. Henry Kennan, 2Q June 
1766. 

Captain Gavin Cochrane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, June 27. London. — Containing information concerning the 
Mortar and Creek Indians in 1764 and of the influence of the French 
over them. Some of the English are not less dangerous, and occasion 
discontent among the Indians by grossly imposing upon them. Com- 
plaints made by the Cherokees against the white people. Measures 
taken by Cochrane in consequence. Evil effects caused by the great 
quantities of rum taken by the traders to the Indians. Explains what 
is meant by the term " Crackers " a lawless set of men on the frontiers 
of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed [with others of 10, 11, and 14 June]: — Cap n Cochrane's 
Letters. From Cap* Cockran 30 of June. 

C. Williamos to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, July 3. Williamsburgh in Virginia. — His voyage to Charles 
Town. Favourable disposition of the people. Salary granted to Lord 
C. [Montagu]. Came through North Carolina to Virginia where he 
intends staying ten days. Improvement in the state of the province. 



46 



Sentiments of the people throughout the continent on the repeal of the 
Stamp Act and the right of taxing themselves. Distress for want of 
money. Proposes a plan for establishing a bank in order to obviate 
this difficulty. Advisability of encouraging the culture of silk, vines 
and olive trees in Carolina and Georgia. 

Autograph letter signed. 12 quarto pages. 



Merchants, Manufacturers and Traders of Manchester to Lord 

Dartmouth. 

1766, July 5. Manchester. — Sincere and cordial thanks for his 
Lordship's assiduity and concurrence in obtaining the repeal of the 
Stamp A.ct and for promoting other Acts essential to the advantage of 
commerce. 

Letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed : — Merchants, &c, of Manchester, 5 July 1766. 



The Marquis of Rockingham to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, July 6, Sunday evening. Grosvenor Square. — Desires to see 
him on the following day to communicate a matter of much political 
•consequence. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Marq. of Rockingham, 6 July 1 766. 



Sir William Johnson to Secretary H. S. Conway. 

1766, July 10. Johnson Hall. — With reference to the enclosed. 
Extract. \\ pages. 

Endorsed: — (Copy.) Extract of a letter from Sir William Johnson 
to Mr. Secretary Conway dated 10th July 1766. 

Enclosure : — 

Reason for establishing a British Colony at the Illinois, with 
some proposals for carrying the same into immediate execution. 
From its extreme fertility it has been called the " granary " of 
Louisiana. The 400 French families now settled there icould not 
be serious rivals in trade as their goods are transported from New 
Orleans up the Mississippi, whereas the English have ready 
communication from Virginia and Pennsylvania to Fort Pitt. 
The French posts on the E. side of the Mississippi being now 
in possession of the English a settlement there would be the best 
means of supporting them . The proposals include — The purchase 
of lands from the Indians; grants to soldiers who served in the 
last war and the offer of a company of gentlemen of character 
and fortune, on consideration of a grant of land, to settle at 
least one white Protestant person to every one hundred acres. 
Yl\ pages. \_ Two copies are in the Marquis of La?isdowne f s 
Collection. See Fifth Report, Appendix, p. 216 and 218.] 

Endorsed : — Reasons for establishing a British Colony 
at the Illinois, with some proposals thereon. 



47 

Lord D[artmouth] to Robert Livesey. 

1766, July 12. — In answer to the letter from the Manchester 
merchants, 5 July. Thanks for the letter received. 
Autograph copy signed. 1 quarto page. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to Henry Seymour Conway. 

1766, July 15. New York. — " Advices from the Ilinois mention an 
illicit Trade, whereby French Goods are smuggled up the Ohio and to 
the Lakes, and the Peltry of those Countrys carried down the Mississippi 
to New Orleans ; where Skins and Furrs bear a Price of ten Pence Pr. 
Pound higher than at any British Market. The best means seemingly 
to prevent this Trade carried on by Collusion between some of His 
Majesty's new subjects from Canada Detroit and other Places, and 
the French Traders, would be to pass a Law to seize and confiscate 
all Furrs and skins going down the Ohio below the Ouabache, or 
down the Ilinois River below the Rock as well as all Skins and 
Furrs from the Ilinois country or above it, which shall be found on 
the Mississippi below the Mouth of the Ohio, or carrying over to 
the west side of the Mississippi." Proposes the erection of posts at 
convenient spots. Fort Chartres must soon tumble as the River gains 
so considerably on its banks every year. Fresh complaints from the 
Indians whom Sir William Johnson is trying to pacify. Has offered 
assistance to drive the settlers off the Indian lands. 

Extract. 3| pages. [The original letter is in the Public Record 
Office. America and West Indies. Vol. 122, fol. 335.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from Major- General Gage to Mr. 
Secretary Conway, dated New York, 15th July 1766. 

Merchants of Liverpool to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, July 19. Liverpool. — Express their thanks for his strenuous 
and effectual support of the many salutary laws passed the last session 
of Parliament, particularly the repeal of the Stamp Act. Desire that 
he will accept the freedom of the borough. 

Letter signed. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed: — Merchants of Liverpool, 19 July 1766. 

Lord D[artmouth] to Dennis de Berdt, in Artillery Court, 

near Goswell Street. 

1766, July 22. — Finds that an application must be made to the 
Governor for a minute account of every particular contained in the 
petition from the Presbyterian Churches of New York. Hopes the 
ministry will be able to recommend the King to grant the charter 
desired. 

Autograph signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Lord Dartmouth's letter, 22 July 1*766. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N. D. [1766, July].— Relative to Brattle's letter to De Berdt, 
<3 June 1766, to grants in Sagadahoc, to memorials from the 
Presbyterian Church in New York, and to Chief Justice Smyth. 



48 

Dennys de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, August 5. Enfield. — Is obliged for the care he took of the 
Boston address. Hopes he will not resign. It must be a misinformation 
that Boston has refused to make the satisfaction recommended by 
Parliament, it must only be a delay. Will write to the speaker on this 
head. . 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Merchants of London trading to America and the West Indies, to 

Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, August 5. London. — Thanks for the services rendered by his 
Lordship to Great Britain and her colonies during his administration. 
Original. ■£ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Merchants of London trading to America & the West 
Indies. 5 August 1766. 

Dennys de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1766, August 22. Enfield. — Expresses his concern at his Lordship's 
resignation, and at the loss the Americans will sustain. Is pleased to 
be the medium of conveying a vote of the House of Representatives 
expressive of their grateful sentiments to him. Is informed of the 
declining state of President Finly of the Jersey College. Does not find 
the petition of the House committed to the care of the Duke of 
Richmond, in the Gazette. Hopes his Grace did not forget to deliver 
it. 

Autograph letter signed. 2f quarto pages. 

Dr. Eleazar Wheelock to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, September 4. Lebanon in Connecticut. — " May it please your 
Lordship. Were I not confident, upon good Testimonies, that God has 
inspired your Breast with another Spirit, than that which rules in the 
men of this world, and with nobler Principles, and higher views than 
they are governd by, 1 might well be solicitous what Returns of 
Gratitude to make, which your Lordship might think Suitable for such 
distinguishing condesention, and Goodness, as you have Shewn in the 
Grand Affair, on which I have sent the Rev d Mess rs Whitaker and 
Occom, in my Stead, to Europe ; but as the success of the general Design 
in view, is the only Joy that is set before you, I need not Trouble you 
with, so much as, a mention of those Sentiments of Gratitude toward 
you, which fill not only mine, but the Hearts of all who love our Lord 
Jesus Christ in this corner of the world. 

Nor can I, with this confidence of your Lordship, be so modestly 
reserved, in a Cause in which I am not conscious to myself of having 
any other governing views than the Advancement of the kingdom of our 
common Lord, and the Interests of his Majesty's Crown, as .not to 
Suggest any other Favour, which may be in the Power of your Hands, 
towards it, or attainable by your Lordship's Influence. And particularly 
that the grand Design be incouraged, and accomodated with a Grant of 
Lands suitably situate, and Sufficient for it, as by the late Conquests 
large Tracts are become the Property of the British Crown, and 
other Tracts which were before chartered, but unsettled and of but little 
account, by Reason of their Distance from English Settlements, and 



49 

their Vicinity to an Enemy's country, are now become valuable and may 
soon be peopled. 

Of these Lands, his Majesty has already been pleased, with good 
Reason, to make various Grants to one and another, as a Reward of 
their Merit, and as Profit has accrued to his Crown by their Service. 
But, may it please your Lordship, there has been nothing hitherto 
devised, or done, in which there is any Prospect of the firm Attachment 
of the Numerous Tribes of Savages in this land, to the british Interest, 
and their becomiuggood and peacible subjects, and industrious Members 
of Society, which has in any Measure that Degree of Probability in it, 
as this has which is recommended to your Lordships Patronage. 

The Nations will not make war with us while their Children, and 
especially the children of their Chiefs are with us — They can't resist 
the Evidence we hereby give them of the Sincerity of our Intentions 
towards them — They know their Sons are made better by being with us 
— and that we make no gain to ourselves by it — They receive the 
Testimony of their Sons, that we constantly treat them as Children in 
Health, and in Sickness, and calculate all our measures for their 
Good — And they begin to believe that our Motives are something 
great, quite beyond what they have before conceived of them — 
Many of them begin to be convinced of the Necessity of Agriculture, in 
order to their Subsistence when their Resourses from the Wilderness 
fail, (as they certainly must do, when, and so fast, as the English extend 
their Settlements among them) and their own Sons are made able, by 
their Education here, to influence them in it — The Reputation of this 
School and their Fondness to have their Children taught in it, are yet 
increasing — A number of their own Sons are now become accomplished 
Interpreters and School Masters, among their Tribes ; and recommend a 
Sober, manly, virtuous, and religious Life by their own Example. I can 
now obtain as many of their Children as I please, to be instructed here, and 
an hundred of them easier than I could one six years ago— .And how 
many and important are the consequences which now open to our view ? 
And by the royal Favour of a Tract of Land, in Some Place convenient, 
sufficient to accomodate the School, and employ the Members of it 
while they are learning Husbandry, there is a fair Prospect that more 
than double the Benefit might be done them, and the Crown, with the 
Same Expence. 

But as I am ignorant what may be reasonable to petition for, and as 
I would not needlessly burden your Lordship in this affair, I have fully 
communicated my mind to the Rev d M r Whitefield, and M r Whitaker, 
by whom your Lordship may expect to hear what may be judged most 
conducive to the great End, in view. 

" I humbly ask your Lordships Pardon for this Freedom, and I hope 
the Nature, and importance of the subject may be esteem'd, in some 
Measure, Sufficient Excuse for him, who begs leave, with the most 
sincere Duty, and Respect to subscribe himself. Your Lordships Most 
Obedient, and Most Humble Servant. Eleazar Wheelock." 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Sir James Jay to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1766], September 22, Monday. Freeman's Court, Cornhill. — Sends 
the charter of the college of New York and desires to see him on 
matters concerning the college. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Sr. Jas. Jay, America, 
y 82140. O 



50 

John Smith to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, October 17. London. — Hopes Dr, Allison's scheme for alteration 
in the mode of church government in America will not succeed. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 § quarto pages. 

Note on back : — Mr. Ernst at the Fox, Brewer Street. 

General Phineas Lyman to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1766, October 28]. — [This letter is not dated, but a letter on the 
same subject addressed to the Earl of Shelburne of this date is in the 
collection at Lansdowne House, see Fifth Report, Appendix, p. 216.] 

Not autograph. 38 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Observations on the navigation of the Mississippi by- 
Gen 1 Lyman. 

Governor Sir Henry Moore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, November 11. New York. — Lord Hope has gone to South 
Carolina for the winter. Hopes the representations made of the 
favourable disposition of the Americans will prove true, but appearances 
are against them at present. Fears the licentious tenets held in some 
of the Charter colonies will be productive of mischief. Will lay the 
Billeting Act shortly before his assembly, and will then see what 
deference will be paid to Acts of Parliament. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Captain Gavin Cochrane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, November 14. Nielstou. — Gives an account of his voyage 
from Savannah to the Island of Frederica, and describes that place and 
others passed en route. Remarks on fruits in Georgia and cultivation 
of the vine in America, also the produce of Charlestown. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

[1766], November 21. — Relative to memorials from the Weaver's 
Company, Major Mant, Gordon, and Captain Speer. 
Autograph. § folio page. 

Endorsed: — Minutes November 21. Weaver, Mant, Gordon, Speer. 

Merchants of New York to the House of Commons. 

N. D. [1766, November 28]. — Petition to resume the consideration of 
the Plantation trade. 

Not signed. 11 folio pages. [Also in the Marquis of Lansdowne's 
Collection, see Fifth Report, Appendix, p. 218.] 

Endorsed : — Petition from New York. 

Bills and Schemes touching the American Colonies. 

N. D. [1766 or 1767]. — An Act for the more effectually restraining 
and preventing several unwarrantable Combinations and Undertakings 
in His Majesty's Colonies and Plantations in America. 

Manuscript. 11^ pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra 1 of Bill. 



51 

N. D. [1766]. — Clause of an Act with reference to the seizure of 
bullion in America. 

Manuscript. 1 quarto page. 

1766. — Pamphlet entitled, " The Charters of the following Provinces 
of North America, viz., Virginia, Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
Pensylvania, Massachusetts Bay, and Georgia. To which is prefixed 
a Faithful Narrative of the Proceedings of the North American 
Colonies, in consequence of the late Stamp Act. London : Printed for 
W. Owen, at Temple Bar ; J. Alinon, in Piccadilly ; and F. Blyth, at 
John's Coffee House, Royal Exchange, MDCCLXVI." 

69 quarto pages. 

N. D. [1766]. — " Scheme for an Union between Great Britain 
and her Colonies by a representation in Parliament." It begins 
thus : — 

" Massachusets Bay - - ^ Each four Members to represent 

Pensylvania - - - > them or a smaller number at 

Virginia - - -J their option." 

2 folio pages. 

N. D. [1766]. — A List of duties laid on certain articles by " The 
Act of Parliament passed in 1764 called the American Act," with 
observations thereon. 

3 large folio pages. 

Endorsed :— Remarks on certain Duties of 1764 & 1765. 

N. D. [1766]. — Paper of suggestions on the best measures to be 
pursued with regard to America. The Declaratory Act to remain 
unrepealed, without saying a word about it in the subsequent nego- 
tiation. The unlimited Supremacy of Parliament, not to be claimed on 
one side nor questioned on the other. The Right of Taxation, neither 
to be renounced on one side nor acknowledged by the other. The 
Supremacy of Parliament to be recognized by the Americans. All 
Acts, deemed grievances, passed since 1763 to be repealed. Commis- 
sioners to be appointed to settle differences. Restrictions respecting 
trade to cease. Troops to return and the fleet to remain or not, at the 
option of the ministry. 

1 folio page. 

House of Lords. 

N. D. [1766]. — [qy. Lord Dartmouth's Draft of a Speech in the 
House of Lords.] American papers to be laid before them for their 
consideration. Remarks on the King's speech. Is aware how delicate 
and difficult a task they have to enter upon, but can have no doubt 
that upon a thorough knowledge of the causes and extent of the 
disease their wisdom will be able to prescribe a proper remedy. State 
of tranquillity in the Eastern hemisphere. Their Lordships will not 
forget to condole with the King on the loss sustained by the death of 
Prince Frederick William. 

Dartmouth's autograph. 4J folio pages, draft. 

d 2 



52 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's Hand. 

N. D. [1766]. — Relative to a letter from Lord Halifax to the Board, 
9 February 1765, and the fishing posts granted by the French King 
on the Labrador coast, 29 August 1765. Concerning a memorial of 
the Virginia and South Carolina agents, some Jamaica papers, and 
two letters from Sir Hy. Moore to Lord Dartmouth, 21 December 
1765. 

1 quarto page. 



Private Memorandum Book of Lord Dartmouth. 

1765-66. — Containing notes of Parliamentary proceedings in 1765 
and 1766, concerning the Stamp Act, and other miscellaneous items. 
Autograph. 14 octavo pages {paper cover). 



Roads in America, 

N. D. [qy. about 1766]. — Paper endorsed, u Captain Legge's 
proposal of a Company of 100 Axmen, to make and preserve roads in 
the interior parts of North America." " There is nothing so much 
wanting in North America, in order to protect the country from the 
Indians, and give immediate relief to the many divided posts we have 
established there, than open and secure roads from one to the other." 
During the late war in North America roads were made by cutting 
down trees. Proposes a scheme which he thinks worth the consideration 
of Government, and believes the result will be adequate to any expense 
incurred. 

2\ quarto pages. 



" Memorandum to take the King's Pleasure." 

N. I). \_qy. 1766]. — Six items respecting the Newfoundland 
Merchants' petition, the Lieutenant-Governor of Placentia, Governor 
Paterson's (of St. John) despatches, appointment of another Secretary 
and Chief Justice for New Hampshire, Colden's willingness to resign 
his office of Lieutenant-Governor of New York if desired, and pardon 
for Reynold McDougal in North Carolina. 

1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Mem m . 



General Phineas Lyman. 

N. D. [1706]. — Reasons for a settlement on the Mississippi. Giving 
state of the country. Inhabited by Indians. Their present relations 
with the English and French. Proposal for settlement of the rich 
country near the Mississippi with the consent of the Indians living 
there. Advantages to trade resulting therefrom, especially to the 
settlement of West Florida. Suggests the establishment of schools 
for Indians. Difficulty of managing Indian affairs from a distance. 
Suitable time for this settlement must be considered. 

Not autograph. 26£ pages. 

Endorsed : — Gen 1 Lyman's Reasons for a settlement in the 
Mississippi. 



53 

N. D. [1766]. — Abstract of the foregoing. 

3£ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Abstract of Gen. Lyman's Reasons. 

Major Thomas Manx. 

N. D. [1766]. —Extracts from his proposal for a settlement at 
Detroit, containing the " Objection " raised by the Board of Trade, and 
his " Defence " in reply. 

4| folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Objection against, and Defence for a Settlement at 
Detroit. 

J. Rob arts. 

N. D. [1766]. — Paper endorsed, " Observations upon Trade in 
general, and upon the Trade with the Spanish West Indies in 
particular." 

Not signed. 20 pages. 

William Prince, Starch-maker, to the Commons of Great Britain. 

N. D. [1766 about]. — Petition. States that starch can be male as 
easily from rice as from wheat, and if he could rely on encouragement 
being given him, he would undertake that business in the present 
distress from scarcity of wheat. Asks that rice imported from the 
American Colonies might for the term of seven years be free of duty, 
and that rice starch might be allowed to be exported. 

Corrected in another hand. J folio page. 

Endorsed : — The Petition of William Prince to the Honourable 
House of Commons on Rice-Starch. 

Sir William Johnson to the Earl of Shelburne. 

1767, January 15. Johnson Hall. — Has just received the news of 
Mr. Croghan, one of his deputies, having surmounted aU the difficulties 
which the French created to obstruct his transactions at the Illinois. 
A peace has been made between the English and th? Indians. The 
necessity of a regular establishment, and a proper support of the officers 
of Indian affairs to preserve this peace on account of the intrigues of 
the French, fraudulent traders, and turbulent Indians. His three 
deputies have each a district allotted for their visitation, but lack of 
power limits their hopes of success. 

Extract. 2\ folio pages. [The original signed letter is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 271, 
fol. 167.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter from Sir W m Johnson to the Earl 
of Shelburne. Dated Johnson Hall 15 th Jan? 1767. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl op Shelburne. 

1767, January 17. — With respect to the trade of the Illinois and 
in general of the Mississippi, the benefit at present accruing thence 
to Great Britain seems to be confined to the disposal of her manufactures. 



54, 

Loss accruing to the Government by the trade carried on by the French 
with the Indians chiefly at New Orleans. 

Extract. 2\ folio pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 123, 
fol. 51.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Major- Genl. Gage to the Earl 
of Shelburne, dated New York, Jany. 17, 1767. 

Captain Francis Legge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, January 20. New York. — Asking his assistance to purchase 
a majority in the 28th Regiment. 

Autograph letter signed. If folio pages. 

Endorsed on a wrapper covering also a letter of 8 April : — Captain 
Legge, New York, 2 Jany 1 .,_-,_ 
8 April J 

Enclosure : — 

Captain Francis Legge. Memorial to Lord Barrington. 
Desiring to purchase a majority vacated by Major Arthur 
Broivn who has had leave to come to England, 
Original. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Memorial of Capt. Francis Legge, of the 46 
Regiment. Captain Legge was appointed Captain 15 
February 1757. 

Reverend Edward Davies to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, February 1. Portskewett. — On receiving the enclosed he 
immediately sent it to the nearest post office to be forwarded. Two 
other packets were found at the same time, apparently dropped from 
some traveller's pocket, one was addressed to Messrs. Neale, Ligon, 
and Booth, merchants, London, and the other to Messrs. Crisp and 
Company, merchants, London. Will be glad to hear of the safe arrival 
of this. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Rev. Mr. Davies. 1 Feby. 1767. 

Enclosure : — 

Stephen Sayre to Lord Dartmouth. 

1766, December 13. Philadelphia. — The merchants of Boston, 
New York, and Philadelphia, and probably all the colonies, 
expected, according to the advice received from the merchants 
of London, that their trade woidd be extended, but they declare 
it has been lessened by the laws passed last session. The 
merchants of Boston and New York have petitioned for redress, 
and those of this toum will probably do the same unless it is 
felt to be impracticable. Remarks on the importation of sugar, 
and prohibition of all foreign rum. The fishery much injured 
by Governor Pallisser and, his officers, and fears it will decrease 
under such severity and partial behaviour. Concern at the 



55 

fresh arrival of troops. Inconvenience caused by Parliament 
destroying the paper currency in the Colonies. 
Autograph letter signed. 10 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Say re, Philadelphia. Dec. 13, 1766. 

Note. — Mr. Sayre was afterwards a sheriff of London and a banker. On a 
charge of treason he was committed to the Tower but released almost immediately. 
Having quitted England he accompanied Arthur Lee to Berlin in the year 1777 and 
was with him when the noted robbery of that Commissioner's despatch box took 
place. 

Major- General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Shelbdrne. 

1767, February 22. — Transmits copy of a journal made out by Captain 
Gordon, Chief Engineer of North America, in his progress down the Ohio 
to the Illinois, and considers its contents respecting the Indian trade on 
the Mississippi and state of Fort Chartres. The Spaniards are not yet 
settled in their new acquisition, but their new subjects are already 
disgusted with a Spanish government, and their inexperience in Indian 
management or commerce may prove advantageous to the English. 
In answer to the Earl of Shelburne's letter of 11 December, he states 
what he considers the best methods of managing the Indians and 
carrying on the commerce with them on the most advantageous terms. 
Is aware of the difficulties of exacting strict observance of any rules by 
the Indians owing to their wild and vicious character. Commends 
means used by the French in trading with them. 

Extract. 10 \ folio pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 123, 
fol. 113.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Major-Genl. Gage to the Earl 
of Shelburne, dated New York, Feby. 22nd, 1767. 

Enclosure : — 

Extracts from the Journal of Captain Harry Gordon. Hcdted 
on the 6th August at Fort " Masiach" formerly a French post, 
• 120 miles below the mouth of the Wabash. Describes the 
country. The reason the French sent a garrison to this place 
was to check the Cherokee parties that came down the river. 
Proposes the erection of a fort here as the most suitable spot 
in connection with the trade carried on up the Mississippi and 
■Ohio. 

Extracts. 4 pages and 3 lines. 

Endorsed: — {Copy.) Extracts from the Journal of Capt. 
Harry Gordon, 1766. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Shelburne. 

1767, April 3. New York. — The situation and particular circum- 
stances of the Illinois country, and the use, if that country is maintained, 
of guarding the Ohio and Illinois rivers, makes him state again the 
necessity of establishing forts at or near the junction of the Ohio and 
Illinois rivers with the Mississippi. On this account troops are to be 
stationed in the Illinois country. Fort Pitt is absolutely necessary for 
a communication with the Illinois. 

Extract. f folio page. [The autograph signed letter is in the 



56 

Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 123, 
fol. 143.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Major- General Gage to the 
Earl of Shelburne, dated New York, April 3rd, 1767. 

Captain Francis Legge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, April 8. New York. — His disappointment at not being allowed 
to purchase a majority. Family matters. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

John Randolph to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, June 10. Williamsburg, Virginia. — Sending two summer 
drakes by the " Hanbury," Captain Estem. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — J. Randolph Esq. Virginia June 1767. 

Lady Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1767, June 15.] Grosvenor Square, Monday night (is endorsed 
14 June). — Writes for Lord Rockingham, who is deeply engaged in 
Cabinet Council and very unwell. He is very anxious for Lord 
Dartmouth to return to town for next Wednesday, when the business to 
be brought into the House of Lords will be most important. He thinks 
their opinions will agree on this matter, and that Lord Dartmouth would 
like to be present. 

Autograph letter signed. 3^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lady Rockingham, June 14, 1767. Ly. Rockingham, 
June 1767. 

Stephen Sayre to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, June 25. New York. — American objection to taxation. Is 
astonished at the Parliamentary proceedings. Remarks on the steps 
taken by the American merchants. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Saver afterwards a banker and well known in 
London. F K D. " 

Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, July 9. Giosvenor Square, Thursday evening. — Details of what 
passed at General Conway's, relative to their coming into administration. 
The Treasury offered to form a plan of arrangement by way of pro- 
positions. Has communicated with the Bedfords, who think G. G. and 
his friends should be included, to carry more weight and more efficacy. 
Hopes to meet Lord Dartmouth with other friends on Monday to discuss 
these affairs. Cannot forsee the result, but greatly needs the assistance 
of his friends at this time. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto paqes. 

Endorsed : — Marq. of Rockingham, July 1767. 



57 

Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1767, August 15. Wentworth, Saturday night. — Apologizes for not 
writing before. Not well up in Parliamentary affairs. Thinks their 
old friends seem to conceive they will gain strength by the addition of 
Lord B.'s friends. Desires to see Lord Dartmouth at Wentworth in 
September and to talk over the past and present state of politics. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Marq. of Rockingham, loth Aug. 17(57. 

Enclosure : — 

The Marquis of Rockingham to [Lord Hardwicke]. 

1767, July 26. Sunday evening. — Gives details of his proceedings 
with the King and others with reference to his plan of adminis- 
tration to assert and establish the rights of Great Britain over 
its Colonies respecting taxation. 
Copy. \\\ quarto pages. 

MlCHILIMACKINAC. 

An Account of the Number of Canoes gone out from July 4 to 
September 12, 1767, and a Return of Peltry sent down from June 23 
to September 25, 1767. Signed by B. Roberts, Commissary of Indian 
Affairs and Trade, and addressed to the Earl of Dartmouth. Showing 
date, traders' names, securities for traders' conduct, number of canoes, 
places of wintering, and value of merchandise. 

1 sheet. 

Endorsed: — Return of the Trade at Michilimackinac 1767. 



Messrs. Baynton and Wharton to Lauchlin McLeane. 

1767, October 9. Philadelphia. — They are the only English mer- 
chants who have ventured to forward British merchandise to the Illinois 
country. Influence of the French great with the Indians. Desirability 
of establishing forts and stationing troops in Illinois to keep the French 
in check. The Chippaways have plundered two batteaux between 
Fort Pitt and Fort Chartres. 

Extract. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Messrs. Baynton ana Wharton 
to Lauchlin Macleane, Esq. Philadelphia, f ; th Ootr. 1"67. 



Memoranda. 

[1767.]— Paper headed "Agenda,'' consisting of memoranda of 
letters and papers under the headings : Trade, — Senegambia, Africa, 
Portugal, Spain ; and Trade, General, — Plantations General, Pro- 
prieties, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Hants, Massachusetts, New York, 
New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, East 
Florida, West Florida, Grenada, Bahamas, Bermuda, Leeward Islands, 
Jamaica, and Barbados. 

Manuscript. 25 pages. 

Endorsed : — Agenda. 



58 

Dennys de Berdt to the Earl op Shelburne. 

1767. — " It is now received as an universal proposition that the 
Strength, Riches and Influence of Great Britain, depend upon Commerce ; 
whatever therefore diminishes our Commerce must enfeeble and weaken 
our national Influence." 

Letter signed. 1| pages. 

Endorsed .— Mr. de Berdt to the E. of Shelburne. 1767. On the 
trade with America. 

General Phineas Lyman to the King. 

N. D. [1767]. — Memorial on behalf of himself, the officers and corps 
of the American Provincial troops. 

Copy. 3 pages. [The original Memorial is in the Public Kecord 
Office, series America and the West Indies, Vol. 270, fol. 367.] 

Endorsed : — Memorial of Phineas Lyman Esq., on behalf of himself 
and others &c, for a settlement on the Mississippi. 

West Florida. 

N. D. [ ? 1767].— Extract of a letter to Mr. Oldham from a 
gentleman said (sic) arrived from West Florida. Describes the country 
for many miles round Pensacola as utterly incapable of cultivation, nor 
is it possible for the troops to procure vegetables however industrious 
they may be, the fatal consequence of which has been the total 
destruction of the 35th Regiment. Scarcity of other provisions. 
Manner of living at Mobile is much the same as that of Pensacola, 
but somewhat better, on account of its being nearer the Indian nations. 
Mobile is not so healthy as Pensacola, being subject in the summer to 
an incurable fever ; this is occasioned by its situation. It is the worst 
quarters British troops were ever sent to and the consequence of their 
going is certain ruin. 

Endorsed : — Account of West Florida. 

New York. 

N. D. [Q#. about 1767.] — Charles Williamos. Proposal for taxing a 
lease of the quit-rents of the province of New York. 
Original in Williamos' hand. 1 page. 

Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to the Earl, of Shelburne. 

1768, January 23. New York. — French people killed on the Ohio 
by the Chickesaws, who are determined not to suffer them to. hunt upon 
their lauds. Mr. Aubryhas always taken pains to restrain the Indians 
in the French interest. Brigadier Haldimandwill, in return, endeavour 
to prevent the French being molested by Indians over whom he may 
have any influence. 

Extract. 1 page. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and the West Indies, Vol. 124, fol. 37.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Lieut.-General Gage to the 
Earl of Shelburne, dated New York, Janry. 23rd 1768. 



59 

The Earl of Hillsborough to the Lords of the Admiralty. 

1768, February 12. Whitehall. — It is the King's pleasure that 
transports be provided to carry the 8th regiment of foot to North 
America. 

Copy. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — (Copy.) Earl of Hillsborough to Lords of the Ad- 
miralty. 12th February 1768. Transports for 8th Regt. 

N.B. — This letter was returned, the Earl of Shelburne having 
signified the King's pleasure to the Lords of the Admiralty. 



The Earl of Hillsborough to Lord Viscount Barrington. 

1768, February 12. Whitehall.— The King orders that the 8th Regi- 
ment be got in readiness to embark for North America to relieve the 
15th regiment. 

Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — (Copy.) Earl of Hillsborough to Lord Vise* Bar- 
rington 12th Febry. 1768. 8th Reg* to relieve 15th. 



Dr. Wheelock's Indian Charity School. 

N. D. [1768, Feb. 17]. — Draft of Certificate, qy., the ' recommend- 
ation " referred to in the following letter. "We the Trustees for the 
monies collected in England for the use & benefit of D r Wheelocks 
Indian Charity Schools in N. A. Do hereby certify all whom it may 
concern that the Bev d Nath 1 Whitaker D.D. hath executed the business 
of his mission in collecting monies for said Charity with zeal, 
diligence, care and faithfulness ; and as a testimony of our intire 
approbation of his conduct in the whole of this extensive and difficult 
business, we have thought proper to make him a present of one hundred 
pounds besides the expence of his journying & the necessary support 
of his family during his absence : And we do most heartily recommend 
him to the notice & respect of all christian people where ever he may 
come, as one whom we have found, by his diligence & faithfulness 
to be very succesful in the business he hath been engaged in. In 
testimony of which we have hereto subscribed our names this. . . ." 

No signatures. ^ quarto page. 



Dr. Nathaniel Whitaker to Lord Dartmouth. 

1768, February 18. London. — "Sir, The recommendation which 
m r Keen sent your Lordship yesterday was drawn by myself, which 
I conclude he informed you of. When I drew it, modesty forbid my 
saying all that might be necessary fully to establish my character 
abroad, as having acted my part, not only with zeal, diligence, care, fy 
J ait hfidness, which could say without arrogance ; but also with prudence, 
wisdom and christian fortitude & finished the work with honour & 
esteem as a christian and minister of Christ, &c. 

I freely own it makes me blush to mention these things, as it savors 
of vanity in me to suppose them of myself ; but if your lordship can 
think that some such amendment can be made consistant with truth, 
it will add to all the former obligations I am under to you & the 
other Gentlemen of the Trust, if you will be so kind as to draw it with 



60 

some such alteration ; and this will give fresh Spirit to the cause itself, 
when the pious doners come to know that I have met with the fullest 
approbation from the honourable trustees. 

As a vessel is going for Boston next week or the begining of the 
week after, if the recommendation can be finished, it will put it in my 
power to endeavour going in her, which, if it can be accomplished, 
will save the expence of longer support here. 

[ beg leave to ask wherther it would not be best to leave out 
of the recommendation the kind donation which the Hon bIe trust 
have made to me, as it may offend some, tho' it should please others 
but this I submit to better judgment. 

If I may have the honour of taking leave of your Lordship before 
my departure, it will add to all the other obligations of your Lordship's 
most obliged most obedient humble Servant, Nath 1 Whitaker." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



Dr. Nathaniel Whitaker to Lord Dartmouth. 

1768, February 23. London. — "Your letter cf the 19 th I received 
yesterday, & the contents intimate your Lordships displeasure with me, 
which very sensibly affects my mind & fills me with sinking grief. 

Doubtless the hurry of my affairs in preparing for my voyage hath 
led me into several steps of conduct which will not bare the reflection 
of my superiors, and discovers great indelicacy, tho' I am not con- 
scious of any designed offence. The reason why I drew up the scetch 
of recommendation &c. was the hint which your Lord-Ship was pleased 
kindly to give, that it should be done to my satisfaction, & the desire 
of m r Keen that I would write something like what I would have, 
which I did not suppose would be the form of it, but be drawn as should 
seem best to your Lordship. Yet I acknowledge upon reading your 
Letter, my conduct appears to me to savour much of dictating which I 
abhor in myself, & which I hope your Lordship will pass by with all 
your wonted kindness. Could I know wherein I have offend your 
Lordship or any of the gentlemen of the trust, tho' inadvertantly, I 
should count it an honour freely to acknowledge it, and humbly to 
ask your and their pardon. And tho' I am not conscious, in the sight 
of God, of any wilful offence, yet, as I know I have numberless 
infirmities & weaknesses, which have exposed me to many unjustifiable 
Steps in conduct, which I reflect on with grief, I huirbly hope a kind 
veil will be cast over them all. 1 heartily retract all I have done about 
the recommendation, and leaving it with great cheerfulness to your 
Lordships wisdom & goodness to form it, as you shall see meet, only 
beg that all I have done amiss may be kindly passed by & that I may stand 
well in the good Opinion of the Hon ble Trustees. 

I can assure your Lordship, that as it has been, so I purpose it ever 
shall be my care & endeavour to promote the cause you have so kindly 
patronized, and pray that the worthy Trust may see a glorious harvest 
of souls gathered from among the poor Indians in America. 

1 ha\e this day taken a pnssage in the vessel which sails next 
Monday for New York, Cap*. Richards. If your Lordship pleases to 
favor me with the Recommendation, it will greatly oblige your 
Lordships most obliged, dutiful & hum be Serv 1 , Nath 1 Whitaker." 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed ;— Rev d Dr. Whitaker 176H. 



61 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Shelburne. 

1768, March 12. New York. — Approaching congress of Indians. 
There is reason to suspect that this presages mischief. Propriety of 
securing the principal posts, particularly those of Niagara and Fort 
Pitt bv putting them in a state of defence. JRemarks on the possible 
disposition of the Indians. The Spaniards have got up to the Illinois 
country from New Orleans. 

Extract. 4 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from General Gage to the Earl 6f 
Shelburne, dated New York, March 12th, 1768. 

Enclosure : — 

1767, October 5 and 28. Fort Chart res, Illinois. — Extracts of 
letters from Lieutenant- Colonel Reed, 34th Regiment, to Major- 
General Gage. His endeavours to reduce the expenses 
attending Indian presents, the exorbitant amount of which gives 
him much uneasiness. Presents are necessary on account of 
the duplicity of the French traders. A memorandum is added 
concerning his proposal to erect four new forts besides Fort 
Chartres. 
Extracts. 

Endorsed: — Extracts of Letters from Lieut. -Col. Reed, of 
31th Reg t to Gen 1 Gage, dated Fort Chartres, Illinois 
Oct r 5th 1767. In Major-Genl. Gage's of Ylth March 
1768. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1768, March 18. — To submit to the King certain instructions 
advisable to be sent to General Gage with regard to the disposition 
of the forts and troops in America. 

1 \ pages. 

Endorsed .-—Minute of Cabinet 18th March 1768. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Shelburne. 

1768, April 24. New York. — Complaints he has made of the settlers 
aud traders from the Spanish side of the Mississippi, who go up the 
rivers Illinois, Ohio, and Ouabache, to trade with the Indians in His 
Majesty's territories. Has desired Don Ulloa to prohibit their going 
up these rivers, and has sent directions to officers commanding at Fort 
Chartres, to scour the rivers with armed boats. 

Extract. 1£ pages. [The original autograph signed letter is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 1?4, 
fol. 129.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from General Gage to the Earl of 
Shelburne, dated New York, April 24th 1768. 

The Earl of Hillsborough to the Earl of Shelborne. 

1768, July 27. Whitehall. — The 64th and 65th regiments are to be 
sent immediately to North America. 

Copy. 1 page. [A draft of this letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 124, fol. 241.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from the Earl of Hillsborough to the 
Earl of Shelburne dated Whitehall 27th July 1768,64th & 65th 
Reg t8 to be embarked. 



62 

The Earl of Hillsborough to the Lords of the Admiralty. 

1768, July 28. Whitehall. — Concerning transports to convey the 
64th and 65th regiments of foot from Ireland to Boston. The frigate 
which is to convoy the transports to North America is to remain in 
those seas in case of necessity. Expedition required in this service. 

Copy. 2\ pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record Office, 
Admiralty, Secretary of State's Letters, Vol. 42, fol. 125.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from the Earl of Hillsborough to the 
Lords of the Admty., dated Whitehall 28th July 1768. Transports 
for 64th & 65th Reg ts . 

The Earl of Hillsborough to General Gage. 

1768, August 13th. Whitehall. — Reasons for his inability to transmit 
directions with regard to letter No. 3, containing opinions and pro- 
positions on the Illinois country. 

Extract. ^ page. [A draft of this letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 124, fol. 287.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from the Earl of Hillsborough to 
Gen 1 Gage, dated Whitehall, Aug st 13, 1768. 

Major- General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1768, August 17. New York. — Intelligence received from Captain 
Forbes, concerning the opposition shown by the inhabitants of the Illinois 
on his endeavouring to form them into regular companies of militia. 

Extract. 2£ pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 124. fol. 291.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Gen 1 Gage to ihe Earl^of 
Hillsborough, dated New York, Aug st 17th 1768. 

Enclosure : — 

Captain Forbes to [Major-General Thomas Gage]. 

1768, April 15. Fort Chartres. — Reasons for the expense of this 
country to the Crown. In consequence he has issued a placard 
forbidding the inhabitants to send any peltry down the river 
before acquainting him with the quantity, and at the same time 
giving a bond of 200/. that they should land it in a British 
port. 

Extracts, lg pages. 

Endorsed : — Extracts of a letter from Capt. Forbes {of the 
34:th Reg*), commanding at the Illinois dated Fort Chartres, 
15 April 1768. In Major- General Gage's of 17 August 

J. Williams to the Commissioners of Customs, Boston. 

1768, September 11. Boston. 
Letter signed. 4 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Letter to the Board giving an Acco* of insults, dated 
llthSepf 1768. Ex. 

Also endorsed: — Mr. Williams to the Commissioners of Customs at 
Boston, giving account of insults rec d in 1768. 



63 

The Earl of Hillsborough to Governor Francis Bernard. 

1768, September 14. Whitehall. — Is commanded to state the King's 
concern at the continuance of the seditious publications and the disorders 
which have so long disturbed the town of Boston. 

Extract. § quarto page. [A draft of this letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 169, fol. 691.] 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Lord Hilsborough to Gov r 
Bernard. 14 September 1768. 



Thomas Cushing, Chairman, at the desire and in behalf of the 
Committee, to Dennis de Berdt. 

1768, Septemher 27. Boston. — Concerning the disturbances at 
Boston. 

Letter signed. 6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Tho s Cushing Chairman Boston September 27. Re- 
ceived November 4. America Postage, 1/4, P, p. Capt Smith. 

Note. — This was afterwards published in the Postscript to the Boston News-Letter 
of 13 October. 



Letters to Dennis de Berdt. 

1768, September 27. Boston. — From Thomas Cushing. Extract on 
the same subject as the foregoing, but worded differently, with three 
other letters to the agent, from Samuel Adams 3 October and Richard 
Cary 22 September and 1 October. Samuel Adams states that the 
troops quartered by the Governor on the town have heen hitherto 
orderly, and the inhabitants preserve their peace and patience, but are 
more than ever determined to relinquish every article from Great 
Britain until the Acts are repealed and the troops removed. 

4 pages. 



John Spottiswoode to Mrs. Woolridge. 

1768, October 4. Temple, London. — Regrets his letters have not 
reached her. Acquaints with what he has done with regard to her 
financial difficulties. The accounts she has already given of the province 
where they are situated are very entertaining. He would be obliged 
for a state of the province and the cultivation. 

Letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — 4th Oct 1 * 1768. John Spottiswoode Esq. 



The Earl of Hillsborough to Major- General Thomas Gage. 

1768, October 12. Whitehall. — As to attempts made " to excite in 
the Indians prejudices to the British interest." 

Extract, lj pages. [Draft of this letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 124, fol. 327.] 

Endorsed; — Extract of a letter from the Earl of Hillsborough to 
. Genl. Gage, dated Whitehall, Oct. 12th, 1768. 



64 

The Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1768, December 12. Monday night, 11 o'clock, Grosvenor Square. — 
The American papers are being read in the House of Lords, and 
resolutions thereon are expected to be made on Thursday. The papers 
give but partial information, and the resolutions are likely to be strong. 
The affairs of Boston " should naturally incline a wise administration 
not to be precipitate, and yet possibly in these times the desire of 
gratifying resentment may overweigh all prudential considerations." 
As the debate will be important he would like Lord Dartmouth to be 
present. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Ld. Rockingham. 12 Deer. 1768. 



*&■ 



Alexander Olunie to Lord Dartmouth. 

1768, December 15. London. — Refers to some property in Tobago. 
Sends a piece of the " Traveller." Fears it will not be published 
before January. Lord Hillsborough approves of it, as also of his plan 
for discovering the western coast of North America. Will inform the 
Marquis of Rockingham of these matters if Lord Dartmouth thinks 
such a step would be advisable. Private affairs. 

Autograph letter signed. 1£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .--Mr. Clunie. 1 768. 



House of Lords. 

Nine Resolutions, not dated, but from comparison with the Lords' 
Journals, believed to be about 15 December 1768. That the Votes, 
Resolutions, and Proceedings of the House of Representatives of 
Massachusetts Bay in the months of January and February last are 
illegal and unconstitutional. The resolution to get the other Houses 
of Representatives to join with them in petitions questioning the 
right of Parliament to impose taxes, and the letters written by them, 
are unwarrantable proceedings. An address to be presented to the 
King to thank him for communication of the papers, and to assure of 
the intention of Parliament to stand by and support him in his measures, 
and that they consider it immediately necessary to proceed in the most 
effectual manner for bringing the authors and instigators of the last 
disturbances to condign punishment. 

3£ pages. 

Endorsed : — Resolutions of the House of Lords concerning America. 

New York General Assembly to the House of Lords. 

1768, December 17. Assembly Chamber, New York. — Petition. 
Signed by Philip Livingston, Speaker. Complaining that their trade 
is languishing. That they have no trial by jury, and now above all 
else, by British Act of Parliament they are to lose their legislative 
authority, and to have duties imposed on them for the express purpose 
of raising the revenue. 

Original. 6| pages. 

Endorsed : — Petition to the House of Lords from the Assembly of 
New York. Opened to the House, 22 March 1769. 



65 

Doctor Eleazar Wheelock to Lord Dartmouth. 

1768, December 22. London. — Sends specimens of Indian mer- 
chandise, in the shape of pipes, tobacco pouch, knife case, &c. Also 
some berries given him by Indian boys as tokens of affection. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — Dr. Wheelock, Deer. 1768. 

Note. — This letter is given in full in the " Memoirs of. the Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, 
D.D.," by Drs. David M'Clure and Elijah Parish, published in 1811. Page 281, 
Appendix. 

American Petitions. 

[1768.] — Copy of three Petitions, not dated, to the King, the Lords, 
and the Commons, from the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of 
Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Government of the Counties of New Castle, 
Kent and Sussex upon Delaware, and Maryland. Refer to the 
establishment of these Colonies by their ancestors, and of their enjoy- 
ment of the rights and privileges essential to freedom to which they 
consider themselves entitled. Express their concern at the passing of 
the Stamp Act. Their connection with the British Empire they esteem 
their greatest happiness and security. Set forth the necessity of 
observing the principles of the English Constitution, the two most 
important of which are self-taxation for the support of representative 
Government and trial by their peers. These invaluable rights and 
liberties are in danger of being for ever lost by the late Act of 
Parliament, imposing burdensome duties and taxes on the Colonies, 
and their payment will very soon become impracticable for want of specie. 
Beseech the King, Lords, and Commons to take their petitions into 
serious consideration, and pursue such measures as may restore the 
rights and liberties of the Colonies. 

The names of the delegates signing the petitions are James Otis and 
Oliver Partridge for Massachusetts Bay ; Medcalf Bowler and Henry 
Waret for Rhode Island; Kendrick Fisher and Joseph Burden for 
New Jersey ; John Dickinson, John Morton, and George Bryan 
for Pennsylvania; Caesar Rodney and Thomas McKean for Govern- 
ment of Newcastle, Kent and Sussex on Delaware ; William 
Murdock, Edward Tilghman, and Thomas Ringold for Maryland ; 
Eliphalet Dyar, David Rowland, and William Samuel Johnson for 
Connecticut. 

Copy. 12 pages. 

John Gordon, late of South Carolina, merchant, to the Kino 

in Council. 
N. D. [? 1768]. — Memorial. Showing how he purchased lands 
from the Spaniards in East Florida, but that Governor Grant dis- 
allowed his claim. Proceedings taken by him in consequence, and his 
coming to London to have his claim examined and established, or 
if His Majesty wishes to purchase the lands an adequate compensation 
may be given him. Jesse Fish and others are connected. 

Copy. 2^ folio pages. [The original memorial is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, East Florida, Vol, 6, fol. 223, annexed 
to an Order in Council of 5 April 1773.] 

Endorsed: — No. 3. Mr. Gordon's Memorial, respecting lands. And 
in another hand : Copy of Mr. Gordon's Memorial to His Majesty 
in Council. 

y 82140. e 



66 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Hillsborougik. 

1769, January 5. New York. — Concerning the Indians. 
Extract. § 'page. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Lieut. -Genl. Gage to the Earl 
of Hillsborough. New York, 5th Janry. 1769. 

Major-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1769, January 6. New York. — Captain Forbes and his proceedings 
with the inhabitants of Illinois. 
Extract. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Lieutenant-General Gage to the 
Earl of Hillsborough. New York, 6th Janry. 1769. 

Enclosures : — 

Paper endorsed : Information of the state of Commerce in the 
Illinois Country, given by Captain Forbes of His Majesty's 
o4th Regiment. (Copy.) In General Gage's of 6th January 
1769. 

Copy. 1 1 folio pages. 

List of French or Spanish Forts or Posts, and Settlements on the 
Mississippi, from the Missouri to the Sea, with the number of 
Troops and Inhabitants at each. 
Copy. If pages. 

State of the Settlements at St. Vincent'' s on the Ouabache. 
Copy. J folio page. 

State of the Settlements in the Illinois Country at Kaskaskias,, 
in 1767. 

Copy. \ page. 

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant -Colonel Wilkins, 18th Regi- 
ment, to Major- General Thomas Gage, dated Fort Chartres, 
13th September 1768. Will use every means to prevent the 
specie being sent out of the country. Is told that a fort is built 
on the south side of the Missouri at its junction with the 
Mississippi, by positive directions of Don Ulloa. Necessity of 
a garrison at Post St. Vincent, and elsewhere. An immense 
trade is said to be annually carried on by the French to this 
place. A priest is much wanted here. Collusion between the 
merchants on this and the other side, to the detriment of British 
interest. Petty French disputes, fyc. 
4£ pages. 

[Duplicates of these enclosures are in the Public Record 
Office, accompanying General Gage's original letters.'] 

Major- General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1769, February 3. New York. — Has received despatches lately from 
Fort Chartres to the 1st November containing very alarming accounts. 

Extract. 3J pages. [The autograph letter signed is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 125, fol. 143.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Lieut.-General Gage to the Earl 
of Hillsborough, New York, 3rd Febry. 1769. 



67 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1769, February 8. — Parliament. Resolutions on the subject of the 
late proceedings in Massachusetts Bay. 
Copy. 4 j) ages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of Resolutions of Parliament, 8 Feby. 1769. 

1769, February 9. — Both Houses of Parliament. Address to the 
King. Promise to effectually stand by and support the King in 
bringing to justice the authors and instigators of the late disorders in 
Massachusetts Bay. 

Copy. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of Address of both Houses of Parliament to the 
King, 9th Feby. 1769. 

Alexander Clunie to Lord Dartmouth. 

1769, April 13. Mark Lane, Thursday morning. — With two specimen 
title pages dated 18 April 1769, and preface to accompanying letters 
which he proposes to publish. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Clunie, American. 

With this is a series of sixteen letters to be published under either 
of the following titles : — " The American Traveller, or the present state, 
culture and commerce of the British American Colonies and the 
further improvement of which they are capable," or " Dedication to 
the Sovereign of the British Empire and Father of his People, &c, 
humbly subscribed by His Majesty's most faithfull subject — the 
American Traveller." The subjects are : — I. His reasons for writing 
on the present state of the British Colonies ; II. His object in writing ; 
III. Account of Hudson's Bay ; IV. Further information as to Hudson's 
Bay ; V. State of its trade ; VI. How to extend the Colony ; VII. 
Relative to Labrador ; VIII. To Newfoundland and refers to the 
fisheries ; IX. The advantages which must arise to Great Britain from 
the newly acquired dominion of Canada; X. Nova Scotia; XI. St. 
John's and Cape Breton ; XII. Trade of New England ; refers to the 
disputes ; XIII. Relates to Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New 
Hampshire ; XIV. New York, its trade and the improvements of which 
the Colony is capable ; XV. Refers to Pennsylvania ; XVI. Trade of 
Maryland and Virginia. 

Enclosure : — 

1766, August 14, — Purport of a letter written on the 14 August 
1766 by Alexander Clunie to Lord Dartmouth. Sets forth a 
scheme for an expedition to the back parts of North America, 
with a view to opening up the trade. His age prevents his 
" undertaking to execute " it, but recommends a person fully 
qualified for so doing. 

Letter signed. ?>\ folio pages. 

Cabinet Minutes. 

[1769], Wednesday, May 31. — At a meeting at the Earl of Hills- 
borough's in Hanover Square. " Present, Lord Granby, [&c] Several 
representations respecting the State of Defence of Newfoundland, Nova 

e 2 



68 

Scotia, the Ceded Islands, the Leeward Islands, and the Bahama Islands 
were read and considered." Defective and ruinous state of the forti- 
fications at St. John's and Placentia. The importance of St. John's 
is fully stated by Captain Debbieg, an engineer, who was sent out in 
1765 and 1766 to survey the harbours in Newfoundland. Advisability 
of dismantling the fortifications at Placentia, and removing the stones 
to St. John. 
1| pages. 

Endorsed : — Minutes at a meeting. 

Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1769, June 25. St. Augustine. — Complains of the conduct of Governor 
Grant and others with respect to lands. Desires his Lordship will 
endeavour to prevent Governor Grant removing him from his office, 
which he has attempted to do on account of a quarrel with Colonel 
Taylor. Details of his distresses. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 1. Mr. Wooldridge. 25 June 1769. 

Indian Speech to Commissary Roberts. 

1769, July 15/16. Arbre Croche. — Made when the Ottawas gave 
the calumet and wampum. With a list of Indian trinkets on a separate 
quarto page. French, with remarks in English. 

7 quarto pages, 

Endorsed : — An Indian Speech made to Commissary Roberts, when 
the Ottawas gave the Calumet and Wampum. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1769, November 1. St. Augustine, East Florida. — On the subject of 
the enclosure which is the result of his philosophical researches in 
Europe and America since 1743. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Enclosure : — 

1763, October 1. Savannah, — William Gerard de Brahm. A 
treaties on natural philosophy dedicated to the King. 
Original. 1 skin parchment. 

The Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth at Sandwell 

Hall, Staffordshire. 



i ) 



1769, November 8. Wentworth, Wednesday. — His indisposition. 
Intends to be in London about a fortnight previous to the meeting 
of Parliament. Importance of the friends of weight being in town 
about that time, to consider very fully what is to be done. Remarks 
on a proposed plan for appeasing America. Speaks of Ireland in 
contradistinction to North America. Would have some doubt on the 
practicability of carrying into execution a plan of a general Parliament 
for all North America. Further observations on a separate Parliament 
for America. 

Autograph letter signed. 12 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Marq. of Rockingham. 8 Nov r 1769. Ex. 



69 

With this is placed a page in Lord Dartmouth's hand marked " Extr* 
of my Lett 1 ', 20 Nov 1 ' 1769," stating that he has no objection to a 
certain petition in particular but to the measure itself, which he fears 
will increase rather than compose the distractions. Was sorry to hear 
that those whom he believes to be the true friends to this country and 
its constitution had been persuaded to concur in and adopt it. 

A. Drummond to . . . (possibly Mr, Pownall). 

1769, November 18. Hackwood. — Concerning the proposal to settle 
some free ports in the West Indies for the sale of the produce of North 
America. Considers such a trade would be advantageous to Great 
Britain and necessary to recover what has been lately lest in seizing 
vessels carrying on this trade whether by British, French, or Spanish 
merchants. States his reasons in full for proposing such a plan, and 
answers all objections he thinks might be raised against it. 

Autograph letter signed. 3^ quarto page?. 

Endorsed : — A. Drummond Esq. 

Governor Sir Francis Bernard to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D [1769]. Salisbury Street, No. 2, Friday morning. [N.B.— 
Bernard left America for England in August 1769]. — Will gladly 
fulfil any further commands. Is going to Aylesbury to-morrow 
morning, 

Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

Gentlemen jiroposed for the Council of Massachusetts Bay, with 
observations why they are now postponed. 

A list of gentlemen proposed for the Council of Massachusetts 
Bay. 

Duplicate of the foregoing enclosures and. two other lists of 
proposed Councillors, no dates. 

Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's hand. 

N. D. [? 1769]. — On the currency, trade, taxation and legislation of 
the Colonies. 

6-| quarto pages. 

N. D. [? 1769]. — Further Minutes, on American papers. Quotes 
part of a letter from Governor B[ernar]d to Lord Hillsborough of 
16 July 1768. 

2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Extracts, Amer. Pap. 

The King's Spekch. 

1770, January 9. — Extract of His Majesty's speech to both Houses 
of Parliament. " It is needless for Me to recommend to the serious 
attention of My Parliament the State of My Government in America." 

2 f°n° v a y e ' 



70 

The Marquis of Kockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1770, February 4.] Sunday afternoon, Grosvenor Square. — 
Desiring an interview respecting a protest necessary to be made in 
the House of Lords on American affairs. 

Not autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

The Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1770, February 5, Sunday [shoidd 6e4] 3 o'clock p.m. Grosvenor 
Square. — Invitation to all the Lords with him in the division 
to meet and examine these protests. Thinks he will then see the 
necessity of being firm. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Marq. of Rockingham, 5 Feby. 70. 

Lord Garlies to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1770], March 9. Charles Street. — Transmitting the enclosed. 
Original. Card 3x4^ inches. 

Enclosures : — 

1766, February 5, April 11, and 1767, February )4. London. — 
The Commissioner of Customs in London to Charles Stewart, 
Surveyor-General of Customs in the eastern middle district of 
America. Commendation for services rendered. 
Extracts. 1 folio page. 

1770, February 20. London. — Memorandum concerning the ap- 
pointment of Charles Steivart as Surveyor- General of Customs 
in America. 

Copy- 4 f olio P a ff e - 

1762, November 21. — Narrative of a riot in Virginia between the 
Spaniards and English, showing the protection given to Don 
Pedro Bermudez, second in command of the sea service at 
the Havana, and his family by Charles Stewart during that 
time. 

Copy. 2| fclio pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 8. A Narrative of a Riot in Virginia in 
November 1762. 



Doctor Eleazar Wheelock to Lord Dartmouth. 

1770, March 12. Lebanon. — " My noble Lord, Your Lordships 
-condesending Letter of of April 10 th 1769 not only advising me of 
Dangers, but calculated with Design to incourage & Strengthen me 
amidst them with the Assurances of your Lordship's Favor and Friend- 
ship, was very refreshing to me ; for which I can make no Suitable 
Return to your Lordship other than my wishes, & Prayers to the God 
of all Grace that you might be more & more built up to the Measure of 
the Stature of the Fullness of Christ. 

I can give your Lordship no other Grounds or Reasons for those 
disadvantageous Representations made of me to his Majesty's Servants, 



71 

than that which I have already assigned viz. the imprudent, & unadvised 
Conduct of a Missionary sent to supply M r Kirtlands place while he 
rode for his Health. I have wrote Sir William Johnson upon the Head 
but he returns me no answer. The Hon 11 Hugh Wallace Esq 1 * one of 
his Majesty's Council in New York writes me that he has discoursed 
Sir William upon the Subject, & that he professes himself fully satisfied 
of my intire Innocence in that affair, but Resented the Publication of 
something in the Narrative given of my School, without his leave, 
which he wrote designing it only for private use &c. 

I suppose your Lordship, has been well informed that he is made a 
Member of the Society in England propagating the Gospel in foreign 
parts, and that the Society have imployed him to build a Cftfr & erect a 
School among the Mohocks, upon the same plan with mine, but 
M r Wallace informs me that his notions of christianizing Indians are 
intirely different from mine &c. Yet I apprehend there is no great 
to be feared from that quarter provided they can be supply ed with 
Missionaries and School Masters of the right sort. I wish my Hon d 
Patrons or some other Friends in England could be Instrumental to 
furnish them with Such, or that I could find pious Youths of the 
established Cnn to educate in this School for that Purpose. 

Your Lordship is doubtless Sensible of the Danger and Difficulty 
(if not impracticability) of proceeding in the Affair of this School, 
according to the largeness of the Plan which God in his Providence has 
evidently pointed out without a legal Incorporation to Secure the whole 
against Reproach, and the Interests of it against the many Plotts and 
Devices of bad men, & especially in bad Times. 

In the enclosed Copy of Incorporation, your Lordship will see some 
success of my feeble Endeavours in that important affair by the Blessing 
of Heaven. 

Governor Wentworth thought best to reject that Clause in my 
Draught of the Charter which gave the Honourable Trust in England 
equal Power with the Trustees here, to nominate and appoint the 
President from Time to Time apprehending it would make the Body 
too unwieldy but he cheirfully consented I should express my Gratitude 
and Duty to Your Lordship by Christianing it after your name ; and 
as there seemd to be Danger of many embarassments in my way in 
the present ruffled & distemper'd state of the Kingdom, I tho't prudent 
to embrace the first Opportunity to accomplish it, and by that means 
could have no time to know your Lordship's Pleasure in that Matter 
before it should be accomplished, which I hope you will accept as excuse 
for that Neglect, and esteem it to be as it is designd, an Expression of 
my Duty and Respect to your Lordship, and a small acknowledgment of 
the many & great obligations which your Condesention and Goodness 
have laid me and my School under to you, but if I have erred as to 
the matter or manner of it, you will be so good as to impute it wholly to 
my Head and not to my Heart. 

I send it enclosed to you that you might have the first view of it, 
and, if I have misnamed it you will please to advise me what your 
Lordship's pleasure is, and I will endeavour to execute it. But I hope 
Sir, I shall be happy as to find it ageable to you, as there is no name 
which would be so universally agreable, not only to the School, and all 
in connection with it, but to our whole country, and I hope in God 
who has so Surprizingly owned it hitherto, to make it a Channel for 
many & great Blessings to his Chn, and that your Lordship's Name, 
& Memory may be perpetuated by it without Dishonor to the latest 
Posterity. 



72 

It appears to me that the Wisdom, -Faithfullness and Lovingkindness 
of God are so manifest in every Step by which this great Affair has 
come to this Ripeness, that none can fix their Thoughts, upon the 
Subject and review the course God has Steerd, and the Steps by which 
he has brought it hitherto, and not find themselves constrained to 
acknowledge his Hand and give all the Glory to him alone. God has 
led the way from Step to Step ; I have had nothing to do but in the 
Capacity of a Servant to follow where he has pointed out the way for 
me. And, blessed be his Name, there has been no such wrong Step 
taken as to give the Enemy opportunity of just Occasion to reproach it. 
In how short a Time has God raised it from Nothing, and made it thus 
respectible, and opened the Hearts of so many to such Liberalities as 
that there is a fair Prospect y* a very large number of pious English 
youth (which I wait upon God to furnish it with) as well as Indians 
may be supported and educated upon Charity. 

If this had boen effected by human Policy it would doubtless be 
admired, and the Instrument of it justly applauded as a great Politician, 
but it is God who has done it, and he has chosen an Instrument on 
Purpose that he might have opportunity and occasion to Shew the 
Excellency of his Own Perfections in the clearest Light, and Secure the 
Glory forever to his own great Name. 

If your Lordship and the rest of my Hon d Patrons shall be pleased 
with what I have done, I shall greatly rejoyce at it, and we will here 
Set up our Ebenezer together. 

My dear & Hon (1 Sir, that God may long lengthen out your Important 
Life, and honor it more & more with eminent Usefulness to the Interests 
of the Redeemers Kingdom, is the earnest Prayer, of your Lord- 
ships much obliged and most obedient Humble Servant, Eleazar 
Wheelock." 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Dr. Wheelock, 1770. 



James Bowdoin, Samuel Pemberton and Joseph Warren to 

Lord Dartmouth. 

1770, March 23. Boston, New England. — Relative to the massacre 
in Boston on the 5th March, and the necessity of the troops being 
removed to Castle Island. The town and province desire that the troops 
be removed from the province and for this purpose they solicit his 
Lordship's interposition and influence. 

Letter signed. 2 J folio pages. With seal. 

Endorsed .—Town of Boston, N. E d March 23, 1770. 

Enclosure : — 

1770, March 22. Faneuil Hall, Boston. Vote of a meeting of 

freeholders and other inhabitants. Signed, William Cooper, 

Town Clerk. That they transmit to Lord Dartmouth a copy 

of proceedings relative to the massacre by the troops in Boston 

on the 6th March. 

Original. 1 quarto page. 

1770, March 23, Boston. — Duplicate original of the foregoing letter 
and enclosure. 



73 

The Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1770, April 9. Grosvenor Square, Monday evening. — Remarks on 
Grenville's Bill and the American Bill. Necessity of doing something 
with regard to the latter. Suggests the repeal of the tea duty. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Marquis of Rockingham, 9 April 1770. 



East Florida. 

List of Grantees. The dates of the grants run from 23 May 1764- 
to 6 June 1770, and the total number of acres granted amounts to 
2,757,000. 

Copy. 7 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — List of Grantees in East Florida. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1770, June 21. — State of the disorders, confusion and misgovern - 
ment which have lately prevailed and do still contii ue to prevail in 
Massachusetts B;iy. 

Copy. 50 folio pages. [Duplicates of this are in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 565, fol 50, and Vol. 171, 
fol. 333.] 

1770, July 6. St. James's. — Order in Council with reference to the 
same disturbances. 

Copy. 5| folio pages. [The original sealed Orde. is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 138, fol. 237, and 
a copy in Vol. 81, p. 459, Board of Trade, Massachusetts Bay.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of Order in Council, 6th July 1770. 

John Williams, Inspector-General of the Customs in America. 

1770, August 17. Boston. — Extract from the Report on a Survey 
and Inspection of the several Ports in Virginia and Maryland relative 
to the Fr.iuds in the Exportation of Tobacco. To the Commissioners of 
Customs at Boston. Signed, J. W. 

2 pages. 

[About August 1770.] — Schedule and notes of several papers 
variously dated, relating to American affairs. 

H p a g es - 

Governor Peter Chester to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1770, September 26. Pensacola. — Relative to settlements on the 
Mississippi. 

Extract. S^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 1. Extract of a Letter from Gov 1 " Chester to the 
Earl of Hillsborough, dated Pensacola, 26th Sept r 1770. 

In a wrapper labelled : No^. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Copies of Five 
Letters (with Enclosures) from Governor Chester to the Earl of 



74 

Hillsborough, in 1770 and 1771, relative to Settlements on the 
Mississippi. [For the four other letters, see 20 and 23 June, and 
28 September 1771.] 

Enclosures : — 

John McIntire to Governor Peter Chester. 

1770, July 19. Fort Natchez. — " I make bold to let your Excel- 
lency know that we are to the number of 80 Souls arrived from 
Fort Pitt in design to settle at Fort Natchez.' 1 ' The assistance 
they require. 

Copy. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Mr. John McIntire to 
Governor Chester. Dated Fort Natchez , \9th July 1770. 

1770, August 25. — Daniel Huay. Deposition before Governor 
Peter Chester. 

Copy . 3 fo Ho pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of the Deposition of Daniel Huay, relative 
to a party of Settlers from Pensylvania setting down 
at the Natchez, the Nature of the Soil there, and his 
Expectation of many more emigrating thither from the 
Northern Colonies. 



The Marquis of Rockingham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1770, November 12, Monday, 3 o'clock, p.m., Grosvenor Square. — 
Desiring his presence that evening to meet the other Lords. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Marq. of Rockingham, 12 Nov 1 ' 1770. 



• Virginia. 

1770, November 23. Whitehall. — Board of Trade, Representation 
to the King. On two Acts passed in Virginia in December 1769, one 
for laying an additional duty upon slaves imported into Virginia, the 
other for the better support of the contingent charges of the Govern- 
ment in Virginia. 

Copy. 4\ folio pages. [Draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
Board of Trade, Virginia, Vol. 45a, fol. 401.] 

Endorsed : — No. 2. Copy of a representation of the Board of Trade 
to the King, dated Nov r 23, 1770, on two Acts passed in Virginia 
in Dec r 1769. 



Indian Traders to the King. 

N. D. [? about 1770.]— George Croghan, William Trent, and 
other Indian traders, 13 of whose names are given. Memorial. 
Respecting their trade with the Indians on the Ohio. Attack made 
upon them by the French King's forces and the Indians in alliance 
with them, whereby they were despoiled of all their property. 
Expected to have had satisfaction for their losses out of the money 
arising from the sale of the French prizes taken before the declaration 



75 

-of last war, but not receiving any, desire some other recompense may 
be made them. 

Manuscript. 1§ pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 33. The Memorial of George Croghan and others 
to the King. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1770. — William Knox. Thoughts upon the Reform of the Consti- 
tution of the Massachusetts Bay. 
19J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Massachusetts Bay, 1770. 

Note. — William Knox was Under Secretary of Stale in the Colonial Department 
from 1772 to 1782. 



David Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 



>i 



N. D. [? about 1770]. At Mr. Williams's, at the "Feathers 
St. Martins' Street, Leicester Fields. — Memorial. Is qualified as a 
missionary. When Major Rogers was appointed to a Government in 
North America, was informed a missionary would be wanted there, 
and applied to him, but is afraid the Major's sudden departure for 
America prevented his applying to the Board of Trade as he promised. 
Desires to become a missionary in America, or any other place which 
may be thought proper. 

Manuscript. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Martin's Memorial. 



Settlement of Lands. 

N. D. [1770], — " Propositions for the Establishment of a Colony 
and Government upon the, lands west of the Alligany Mountains, ceded 
to the Crown by the Indians at the Congress at Fort Stanwix in 1769, 
to be called Pittsylvania." 

26^ pages. 

N. D. [1770]. — Considerations on the foregoing propositions. 
Manuscript. 3J pages. 



Manufacture of Tar. 

N. D. [? 1770]. — Mr. Webster's observations on tar, and the ad- 
visability of encouraging the Americans to make it in furnaces in the 
same manner as is done in Sweden. 

Manuscript. \ large folio page. 

Endorsed : — Mr. W T ebster's Observations, Naval Stores. 



Non-importation Associations. 

N. D. [about 1770]. — Pamphlet entitled : Copies and Extracts of 
Papers relative to the Associations in the British Colonies against 
importing goods and merchandise from Great Britain. Containing, — 



76 

Massachusetts Bay. 

Copies of letters from Bernard, 9 August 1768 and 8 May 
1769. 

Copy of a letter from Hutchinson, 20 October 1769. 

Extracts of letters from Hutchinson, 8 August — 17 November 
1769. 

Extracts from Boston and Massachusetts Gazettes, 22 August and 
12 September 1768, and 24 April — 20 November 1769, giving 
proceedings of merchants on non-importation and their two 
agreements of 1 August 1768 and 17 October 1769. 

Information of Mr. Mein, a bookseller at Boston, lately arrived 
from there, taken by Mr. Pownall. 

Extract from a pamphlet published by order of the town of Boston. 

Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania. "There is no Account from 
the Governors and Companies of the Colonies of Rhode Island and 
Connecticut, or from the Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania, of 
any Associations against Importation ; but the following appear in 
the * Boston Gazette ' and other Public Prints." Extracts from 
several Boston and South Carolina Gazettes in 1769, showing the 
feelings of the merchants of Rhode Island, Connecticut, South 
Carolina, and Pennsylvania on non-importation. 

New York. Sir Henry Moore has taken no notice, in his corre- 
spondence with the Secretary of State, of any Associations against 
importing British goods into the province of New York ; but the 
following publications appear in the newspapers of that and other 
provinces. Extracts from "Boston Gazette" and "New York 
Journal." Votes of Assembly. Proceedings of merchants. Letters 
from New York in 1768 and 1769, with extract of a letter from 
Gage of 4 December 1769. 

Virginia. Association, signed on 18 May 1769. 

North Carolina. Extract from " North Carolina Gazette," giving 
association, signed 7 November 1769. 

Maryland. Copy of a letter from Eden, 23 June, with association, 
signed 22 June 1769. 

South Carolina. Copy of a letter from Gov. Montagu, 30 June, with 
agreement, 28 June, and association, 17 August. Extract of 
letters from Bull, 28 August and 25 September 1769, and extract 
from "Massachusetts Gazette," 17 August 1769. 

Georgia. Extract of letters from Wright, 20 September 1769. 
Meeting of merchants, 16 September, and resolves of inhabitants on 
19th. 

70J quarto pages. 



The Earl of G[uilford] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1771, January 18. — Is grieved to find he appeared wanting in duty 
and regard to the King, love to his country, friendship to Loid North, 
and affection to himself. Is too much hurt to talk upon the subject. 

Autograph letter signed " 0." 

Endorsed on a wrapper which covers also the two following: — 1771. 
Earl of Guilford. 



77 

The Earl of Guilford to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1771], January 20. — With autograph draft of reply on the reverse 
page. Inquiries after Lady Dartmouth's health. Hopes to see them 
both on Tuesday. 

Reply. Having taken a step contrary to Lord Rockingham's opinion, 
Lord Dartmouth fears he will not be in spirits to appear in a company 
where everyone will feel so differently from himself. 

Autograph letter signed " 6r." 

The Earl of Guilford to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1771, 20 and 21 January.] Sunday night and Monday morning. — 
Will be much disappointed if both he and Lady Dartmouth do not 
come on Tuesday. Has felt keenly the difference in opinion expressed 
by him, but hopes his warmth will be rightly understood and the subject 
dismissed. 

Autograph letter signed " G." 

Mr. Peter Livius to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1771, March 21. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. — Relative to the 
Governor appropriating lands granted to his predecessor. The whole 
of the Council (himself excepted) agreed to this proceeding. Gives in 
the enclosed paper his reasons for dissenting from them. 

Copy. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Livius to Lord Hillsborough, 21st March 1771. 
Complaint against the Gov r of New Hants. 

Enclosures : — 

1771, March 19. In Council, New Hampshire. — Peter Livings 
reasons for dissenting from the Neiv Hampshire Council on their 
consent that the present Governor shoidd have these lands. 
With list of the Council. 
Copy. 2 folio pages. 

Mr. Peter Livius's memorial to the Board of Trade. Complains 
of the injustice of Governor Wentworth in several instances 
given in detail. 

Copy. 2| folio pages. 

Samuel Lloyd to Lord Dartmouth. 

1771, April 6. No. 7, Winchester Street. — Remarks on the work of 
the Reverend Matthew Graves as a faithful missionary for twenty years 
past. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Sa. Lloyd Esq., 6 April 1771. 

Enclosure : — 

Reverend Matthew Graves to [Samuel Lloyd]. 

N London, Sth 5th [5« 8* Oct.'] 1770. Death of Whitfield at 
Newbury on the 30th of last month. Laments the heresy of 
some of his brethren. Doctor Wheelock has had 3,000 acres of 
land granted to him, on which he is building an academy for 
whites and blacks. 

Copy. 1 quarto page. 



78 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1771, April 19. Boston. — Transmitting a printed paper called Jan 
Oration, with a vote of the inhabitants of the town of Boston. 
Pernicious influence of such publications. Conduct of the Council. 

Copy. 1^ folio pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the 
Public Becord Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 172, fol. 277, 
and a duplicate in Vol. 81, fol. 293, Board of Trade, Massachusetts 
Bay.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a letter from Governor Hutchinson to the Earl 
of Hillsborough dated Boston 19th April 1771. B/ 31st May. 

Arthur Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1771, May 10. London. — His gratitude for Lord Dartmouth's 
recommendation by which he has obtained the office he desired, and 
in which he hopes to meet his approval. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Arth. Gordon Esq., Att. Gen. of East Florida" May 
1771. Ex. 

Enclosure : — 

Estimate of the expense of surveying and passing into a grant 
an order from His Majesty for 20,000 acres of land in East 
Florida. 

Copy. 1 quarto page. 

East Florida. 

N.D. A true copy taken from the original 14 May 1771. — Inhabitants 
of St. Augustine. Address to President John Moultrie. They con- 
gratulate him on the honour of presiding over the administration of the 
province. Wretched condition of the country in general. Advise 
convening the people by their representatives for the purposes of 
legislation. Want of laws. 

1 page. 

Governor Peter Chester to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1771, June 20. Pensacola. — With reference to proposals contained 
in his letter of 26 September 1770, to afford protection to the 
settlers on the Mississippi. 

Extract. \\ folio pages. [The signed letter, numbered 21, is in the 
Public Becord Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 258, fol. 233, 
and a duplicate is in Vol. 5, fol. 209, Board of Trade, West Florida.] 

Endorsed: — No. 2. Extract of a letter from Gov r Chester to the 
Earl of Hillsborough dated Pensacola, 20th June 1771. 

Governor Peter Chester to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1771, June 23. Pensacola. — On the same subject of settlements near 
the Mississippi. Arrival of Lieutenant-Governor Durnford from there. 

Copy. 3J folio pages. [The signed letter, numbered 24, and 
duplicate are in the same volumes as the preceding, on fols. 291 and 229 
respectively.] 

Endorsed : — No. 3. Copy of a letter from Governor Chester to the 
Earl of Hillsborough dated Pensacola in West Florida, 23rd June 
1771. 



79 

Lieutenant-Governor Eltas Durnford to Governor 
Peter Chester. 

1771, June 23. Pensacola. — According to desire, offers his senti- 
ments on the state of the country near the Ibberville and Mississippi 
and the proper method of settling it. Complaints made to him by the 
Spanish commandants. 

Copy. 3 1 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 4. Copy of a letter from Lieut. Gov r Durnford 
to Gov r Chester, dated Pensacola, 23rd June 1771. ("This is No. 4 
in a wrapper covering several other papers, see List on Chester 
to Hillsborough, 26 September 1770.] 

Georgia. 

Estimate of the Civil Establishment and other incidental expenses 
attending the same from 24 June 1770 to 24 June 1771. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Estimate of the Civil Establishment of His Majesty's 
Colony of Georgia, and other incidental expenses attending the- 
same from the 24th June 1770 to 24th June 1771. 



The Earl of Hillsborough to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1771, July 3. Whitehall. — Requesting him to come to England to 
answer the complaints preferred against him in the offices of Surveyor- 
General of the southern district of America and Surveyor of lands in 
East Florida. Mr. Mulcaster to take his place as Provincial Surveyor 
of East Florida. 

Copy, j folio page. [Draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 275, fol. 491.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from the Earl of Hillsborough to Mr. De 
Brahm, Surveyor-General of Southern District of N° America 
dated July 3rd 1771. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to the Bishop of London. 

1771, July 5. — Relative to a letter and papers from Governor Went- 
worth on Doctor Wheelock's schools, and desiring the Bishop to become 
a trustee. 

Autograph Copy. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Letter to the Bp. of London 5 July 1771. 

The Bishop of London to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1771, July 9. Fulham. — Signed Ric. London. Could not think of 
accepting a trust for the erection and endowment of a College, the 
charter of which has not been communicated to him ; nor has the least 
intimation been given that provision is made in the charter for the head 
of the College to be of the Church of England, or that the prayers to 
be used are those of the Liturgy. Finds also by reference to the list 
that the other trustees are Dissenters, and thus he cannot see of what 



80 

use a Bishop of London, would be under the circumstances; begs 
therefore to decline the honour the trustees have done him. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — July 1771 Bp of London. 

Inhabitants of Detroit to Governor Guy Carleton. 

1771, Aoust 2. Du Detroit. — Petition signed by Jacques Campan 
and three others. Desire that he will aid them in recovering the Isle 
au Cochon. 

Signed. 2f pages. In French. 

Endorsed : — Petition of the Inhabitants of Detroit, 2d Aug* 1771. 

Governor Peter Chester to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1771, September 28. Pensacola. — Transmits five maps of the lands 
near Fort Bute, the rivers Mississippi, Ibberville, Amit, and Comit. 
Remarks on these places. Encloses estimate. Desirability of a settle- 
ment on the Mississippi and objections thereto. Sends three maps of 
parts of this province, showing grants of lands. [Maps not now with 
the letter.] 

Copy. 12^ folio pages. [The signed letter and duplicate are in the 
Public Record Office, same volumes as previous letters of 20 and 23 June, 
fols. 499 and 309 respectively]. 

Endorsed: — No. 5. Copy of a letter from Gov r Chester to the Earl 
of Hillsborough, dated Pensacola, 28th Sept r 1771. 

For the wrapper covering this and other papers, see Chester's 
letter of 26 September 1770. 

Enclosure : — 

Elias Durnfortfs estimate of the expence which will attend 
making the proposed cut from the river Mississippi to the river 
Ibberville, and for putting up four redoubts at Manchac. 
Copy. 2 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Estimate of making a cut from the Mississippi 
to the Ibberville and of the other ivorhs proposed at 
Manchac near the said cut or canal. 

Mr. [W.] Bollan to the Massachusetts Council. 

1771, October 18. — Concerning certain lands granted in the eastern 
parts of the province. Suggests how this territory might be put under 
more certain and better regulation. 

Extract. 3} pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from Mr. Bollan to the Council of the 
Massachusets Province, dated Oct r 18th 1771. 

Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1771, November 18. New York. — Complains of Governor Grant's 
behaviour towards him and non-payment of salary. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed ;— -No. 2. M r Wooldridge, 18 Nov r 1771. 



■81 

Cabinet Minute. 

1771, November 28. — Held at Lord Rochferd's. Directions to be 
sent to different Governors and to the Admiralty. 
In John PownalVs hand. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorse d .—Minute of Cabinet. 28th Nov 1 ' 1771. 

John Williams to Lord North. 

1771, November. — With regulations for the security and improve* 
ment of the duties on tobacco. The arrangements upon which certain 
merchants will undertake this trade. 

Letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1771, December 1. — At Lord Suffolk's. That General Gage be 
instructed to abandon Fort Chartres at such time as his prudence shall 
suggest; also to send, for their consideration, his thoughts for a 
permanent establishment in the Illinois, and to abandon Pittsburgh 
unless the contrary be absolutely necessary. 

1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Minute of Cabinet. 1st Dec r 1771. 

Earl of Hillsborough to Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage. 

1771, December 4. Whitehall. — Extract. The advisability of the 
abandonment of Fort Chartres ; necessary orders to be given for that 
purpose, and for a reduction of all establishments incident to that post. 
Refers to his letter, No. 03, upon the plan for forming an establishment 
at Kaskaskies. Opinion upon the removal of the inhabitants. 

3| pages. [Draft of the entire letter is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 127, fol. 359.] 

[Lord Dartmouth] to Governor James Grant. 

N. D. [? 1771]. — Recommends Mr. W[ooldridge] to his consideration, 
and hopes in the future they will live on friendly terms. 
Autograph draft. 1 J quarto pages. 

East Florida. 

1768-1771. — An account of the several articles (the actual produce 
of the Colony) exported from East Florida for four years. 
Copy. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .-—Exports of East Florida in 1768, 1769, 1770, 1771. 

Mr. Kelly to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1772], January 31, Friday. John Street, Crutched Friars.— 
Mr. Wooldridge wishes to know if his salary is in the estimate for the 
present year, which Mr. Pownall says is made. 

In the third person. 1 quarto page. 

y 82140. ' F 



82 

George Mercer to the King. 

1772, February 20. London. — Copy of a memorial, with a memo- 
randum that the Earl of Hillsborough has the original in his possession. 
Requesting some reward for his services in North America during the 
late war. Accompanied by copy of another memorial, presented in June 
1766 to the Lords of the Treasury, recounting what he had gone through 
on account of his employment in Virginia as distributor of stamps, and 
desiring repayment for the expense he was obliged to incur. 

3 pages and \\ pages respectively. 



Dutch Church of New York to the King. 

1772, February 27. — Petition of the Minister, Elders, and Deacons 
of the reformed Protestant Dutch Church. To remit the annual quit- 
rent of the township of Leyden, a tract of land granted to them. 

Copy. 2 pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 2. Petition of the Dutch Church at N. York to 
the King. 27 Feb. 1772. 

Jean Daniel Roux to the Board of Trade. 

1772, March 4. — Petition. His intention to settle with his family 
and others (120 in all) in East Florida. Asks for 6,000 acres, and for 
the usual bounty to settlers. States the different branches of agri- 
culture he is well acquainted with. In an additional paragraph asks 
for a further grant of 6,000 acres. 

Signed. 1J folio pages. With seal. [A signed duplicate of this, 
but containing an extra paragraph, is in the Public Record Office, Board 
of Trade, East Florida, Vol. 6, fol. 109.] 

Endorsed .-—The humble petition of John Daniel Roux. 

Mr. Kelly to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, March 18, Wednesday morning. John Street, Crutched 
Fryers. — On the subject of Lord Barrington's refusal to accept the 
resignation of Mr. Wooldridge, who depends on Lord Dartmouth to 
obtain for him the King's leave of absence. 

Autography third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— -No. 3. Mr. Kelly. 18 March 1772. 

Merchants of London to the Board of Trade. 

1772, March 21. London. — Memorial of Merchants of London con- 
cerned in the trade to North America. 
Copy. 1 'page. 

Endorsed: — Copy. Memorial from merchants of London praying a 
continuence of bounty on lumber, &c, from North America. 
Dated London 21 March 1772. Recommended to the Secretary 
of State for re-consideration by his Lordship's devoted Servt., 
Brook Watson. London 18 Jan? 1775. 



83 

Edward Thurlow and Alexander Wedderbdrn to the 
Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, March 31.— Report. With the opinion of Robert Williams, 
dated 22 June, referring to the Circuit Court Act, and to the difficulties 
that have occurred to the Treasurers on application of the Judges for 
their salaries ; and with Minutes of the South Carolina Council, 18 
June, on the Report of the Attorney and Solicitor General Thurlow and 
Wedderburn being presented to them. 

Copy. 3 large pages. 

Endorsed: — (Papers Nos. 2, 3, & 4). [Note. For paper endorsed 
No. 1, see under 31 December 1772, South Carolina Report of 
Committee.] 



Merchants of London to the Board of Trade. 

1772, April 7. London. — Memorial of Merchants of London con- 
cerned in the trade to North America. 

Copij. | page. 

Endorsed:— Copy. Memorial from the merchants of London praying 
a continuence of bounty on lumber from North America. Dated 
London 7th April 1772 of which no notice taken. Recom- 
mended to the Secretary of State for his Lordship's consideration 
by his Lordship's devoted humble servant, Brook Watson. London 
18 Jany 1775. 



Massachusetts Bay. 

1772, April. — State of the Proceedings respecting the complaint 
of the Commissioners of Customs, as to their being taxed by the Boston 
Assessors. 

Draft. \0\ pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 6. State of the Proceedings respecting the Com- 
missioners of the Customs complaint of being taxed by the Boston 
Assessors. 



Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, May 8. St. Augustine. — Mr. De Brahm is his fellow sufferer 
from Mr. Grant's tyranny. Suspension of Mr. Collins, Clerk to the 
Crown. Dr. Turnbull has gone to England to call Mr. Grant to 
account for his bad behaviour. Fertility of the southern part of the 
province. Governor Grant may be an excellent officer, but he is a most 
tyrannical Governor. Method of Governor Ellis at Georgia and con- 
sequent flourishing state of the province. His desired leave of absence, 
private affairs requiring his presence in England. Depends on Lord 
Dartmouth to enable him to retain his appointment. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. With seal. 

Endorsed .-—American business. 

f 2 



84 

The Earl of Hillsborough to the Lords of the Admiralty. 

1772, May 21. Whitehall— The 66th and 68th Regiments to come 
to Great Britain, and be relieved by two battalions of Royal Americans, 
to sail from any port General Gage may think proper. 

Copy. \\ pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record Office, 
Admiralty, Secretary of State's Letters, Vol. 44, No. 46.] 

Endorsed : — (Copy.) Earl of Hillsborough to Lords of the Admiralty 
21st May 1772. Royal Americans, to relieve 66th and 68th 
Reg ts . 

William Bollan to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, May 25, Southampton Street, Covent Garden. — Remarks on 
liis previous memorial. Recounts his services in America. Desires his 
Lordship to take the enclosed petition into consideration. Complains 
of having been dismissed by the Admiralty Board, and has all along 
received no recompense for his services. 

Copy. 2§ quarto pages. [The signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 276, fol. 283.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from Mr. Bollan to the Earl of Hills- 
borough May 25th 1772. In Mr. Bollan's Memorial. 

Enclosures : — 

William Bollan, Memorial, complaint, and petition to the 
King. 

Copy §\ pages. [Original in the same volume as the above, 
fol. 287.] 

Endorsed : — Memorial, complaint, and petition of Mr. 
Bollan, to the King in Council. (Copy.) Requesting 
compensation for his sufferings in office and dismission 
from it, and likewise stating the da?nage done to the 
mast trees in New Hampshire, reserved for the use of 
the Royal Navy. V. Mem., p. 13. Entd. 

William Bollan. Addenda to his Memorial to the King. 

Copy. 2 J quarto pages. [Original in the same volume as 
the above, fol. 287.] 

Endorsed: — Addenda to Mr. Bollan' 's Memorial to His 
Majesty, Massachusetts Bay. 

John Williams. 

1772, June 4. — Regulations humbly submitted to Lord North, for 
the better securing the duties upon wine, fruit, oil, and other dutiable 
goods, in America, and likewise preventing the foreign trade. 

Signed. 2§ pages. 

Endorsed : — C. 23. Regulations submitted to Lord North for 
America to prevent smuggling. 

Sir William Johnson to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, June 29. Johnson Hall. — Recounts a late unlucky transaction 
with the Indians, which may be productive of very ill consequences. A 
certain man of the name of Ramsay, who formerly lived amongst the 



85 

Indians and was sent by Captain Brown to Quebec to prevent his doing 
further mischief amongst them, has found means to trade with the 
Indians at Lake Erie, at a distance from any fort or place of inspection. 
Had quarrelled with and killed and scalped several. The General has 
sent him to Canada to be tried, but interest will probably secure his 
acquittal. Sir William fears the resentment of the tribes, in spite of 
assurances of their deputies that orders have been given to prevent any 
act of retaliation. .." The Chippawaes and Mississagaes are by far the 
most numerous and powerful nation with whom we have any connection 
in North America." 

Copy. 4^ pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 276, fol. 787.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Sir William Johnson to the Ear? 
of Hillsborough dated Johnson Hall 29th June 1772. 

Kear Admiral John Montagu to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, July 11. Boston. — With reference to the seizure and burning 
of His Majesty's schooner " Gaspee," at Rhode Island. 

Copy. 1^ pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 173, fol. 327.] 

Endorsed •■ — No. 9. Copy of a Letter from Rear Admiral Montagu 
to the Earl of Hillsborough dated Boston July 11th 1772. 

Enclosure : — 

Declaration of Aaron, a negro, tvith list of names of Jive men 
concerned in destroying the " Gaspee. }> 
Copy. 2 pages. 

Endorsed : — Declaration of Aaron, a negro. 

Massachusetts Bay House of Representatives to the King. 

1772, July 14. — Petition and Remonstrance. To be allowed to support 
their own governor, and against the revenue Acts of Parliament. 

Copy. 5\ pages. [The original is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 174, fol. 291.] 

Endorsed: — No. 1. Copy of the Petition and Remonstrance of 
the Ho. of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay July 14 1772* 

Richard Stockton to Samuel Smith. 

1772, July 22. Princeton. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed ;— No. 1. Prince Town, 22 July 1772. Richard 
Stockton, Esq., to Mr. Smith, relative to the Charter of Incor- 
poration of the Presbyterian Church. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1772, July 30. St. James's. — The Rhode Island business placed by 
Lord Hillsborough before the Cabinet. Opinion of the meeting that 
certain instructions should be sent by his Lordship to the Governor. 
Orders to be sent to Admiral Montagu on the subject. Opinion of the 
Attorney and Solicitor General to be taken. 

Copy. 1| pages. 

Endorsed: — St. James's, July 30th 1772. Minute. (Copy.) 



86 

Lord North to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, August 3. Bushy Park. — Remarks on the petition for a grant 
of land on the Ohio, in consequence of which Lord Hillsborough 
has seen fit to send in his resignation. Asks permission to recommend 
Lord Dartmouth to the King as his successor. Reasons for wishing 
this. Desires an interview. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 5\ quarto j,ages. 

Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, August 5. New York. — No. 75. Transportation of troops 
from America to St. Vincent. Arrival of a detachment of the 64th 
Regiment at Castle William. Delay in getting the American battalion 
down from the Lakes. Regrets that sketches of the works constructed 
at the Havannah have not been procured. Outrage committed on 
20 Indians while on their way to make some representations to the 
Governor at Annapolis. 

Copy. 2\ quarto pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 128, fol. 105.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a letter from Lieut.-Gen 1 Gage to the Earl of 
Hillsborough, New York 5 Aug 1 1772. 

The Earl of Hillsborough to Lord [North]. 

1772, August 7. Hanover Square. — " Will you say to Lord Dartmouth 
that at my request you have engaged for him that Kilwarlin shall have 
this Office when it falls ? and will you be so good in consequence of 
that Engagement, as to get Lord Dartmouth's absolute promise ?" 
. . . if it falls in Ld Dartmouth's Administration I earnestly pray 
that Kil may have it ; and I have been ... a good nurse of the 
Office for Lord Dartmouth by not yielding to any Scllicitations for 
Reversions." 

Letter signed. 2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B. 38. Lord Hillsborough. 7th August 1772. Desiring 
the office of Secry. of Virginia for his son. 

The Earl of Hillsborough to the Governor and Company of 

Rhode Island. 

1 772, August 7. Whitehall. — Expressing His Majesty's displeasure 
at the tone of menace and insult assumed in Governor Wanton's 
letters to Lieutenant Dudingston of the 22 and 23 March last. 
They are to exert themselves most actively for the discovery of the 
offenders with regard to the burning of the " Gaspee " schooner. 
Instructions will be sent to Rear- Admiral Montagu. Encloses an Act for 
the preservation of His Majesty's dockyards. Remarks upon complaints 
made by Governor Wanton of the conduct of His Majesty's officers. 
H pages. 

Endorsed: — Dra* to the Gov r & Company of Rhode Island. 
Whitehall, 7th Aug 1 , 1772. N.P>. — His Majesty having directed 
on the 21st August that the Papers relative to the disturbances 
in Rhode Island should be laid before the Privy Council, this 
letter, which had been sent to the Admiralty to forward, was 
recalled & cancelled. V. Mr. Pownall's letter to Mr. Stephens 
of 22nd Au" 177?. 



87 

John Pownall to Lord [Dartmouth], 

1772, August 8. — Expresses his gratification at the prospect of his 
Lordship becoming Secretary of State. Remarks on his own services 
and his inability to take more upon himself. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Pownall, 8 August 1772. 

* Frederick Montagu to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 10. Papplewick. — Recommends his accepting the 
seals of the American Department. He (Montagu) could not accept 
a seat at the Board of Trade without the approbation of Lord Rocking- 
ham, which could never be obtained. Offers his services otherwise than 
in this. Will come and see his Lordship if he desires it. Advises him 
to insist upon the whole patronage of his office, and particularly upon 
the sole appointment of the governors. 

Autograph tetter signed. 4 pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Montagu, Aug. 10, 1772* 

Edward Thurlow and Alexander Wedderburn to the 
Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, August 10. Lincoln's Inn. — Their opinion and report upon 
the burning of the " Gaspee " schooner in Providence river, Rhode Island. 

Letter signed. 2 J pages. [In the Public Record Office, series 
Domestic, Geo. III., Vol. 9, is a copy marked w Original mislaid."] 

Endorsed : — Report of the Attorney and Solicitor General, 10th 
August 1772. Ent. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord [Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 12. London. — Satisfaction of America at his Lord- 
ships appointment as Secretary of State. Has finished his general map 
and given it with reports to Mr. Pownall. Transmits copy of a letter 
written by him to Lord Hillsborough. Remarks on the state of his affairs. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. de Brahm. 

The King to Lord North. 

1772, August 13. St. James's, five minutes past 1 p.m. — Lord 
Dartmouth cannot have the seals until to-morrow if the Council is not 
held to day. 

Original. With seal (broken). \ quarto page. 

Endorsed :— The King. 13 August 1772. 

Enclosure :— 

Memorandum in the King's hand, proposing that on the present 
vacancy of Secretary of State for the American Department, 
and to prevent every possibility of jarring in departments, the 
Admirals, Commanders and Governors should transfer their 
correspondence to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs of 
the Southern Department. 
Autograph. 1 quarto page. 



88 

Oath of Secretary of State. 

1772, August 14. St. James's. — Order in Council with the Oath of 
a Secretary of State, taken by William, Earl of Dartmouth, on this day. 
The Oath begins, " You shall swear to be a true and faithful servant 
unto the King's Majesty." 

Signed and sealed. 2 folio pages. 

Lady Edgecumbe to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 16. Mount Edgecumbe. — Congratulations on his 
appointment. They would have been happy to be not only his Lord- 
ship's friends, but subjects, and would have been, by means of some 
islands in Massachusetts Bay and lands in Sagadahook, had not an 
unfortunate opinion lately given, pretty nearly proved they had no such 
right. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lady Edgecumbe 16 August 1772. Congratulations. 

Thomas Boone to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 18. Nassau Street, Soho. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Boone 18th August 1772 recommending Mr. Tatt- 
nall to be Councillor in Georgia. 
Again endorsed Tho s Boone Esq., Councillor of Georgia. 

to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 18. Arguments against the proposed Ohio settlement. 
Congratulates him on succeeding Lord Hillsborough as Secretary of State 
for the Plantations. 

Original. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — C. 35. Anonymous. Ohio Settlem ts . 

Cabinet Minutes. 

1772, August 20. St. James's.— Marked No. 1 and No. 2. Agreed, 
that all the papers on the affair of the " Gaspee " schooner be laid before 
the King. That a commission be issued to take proceedings for the 
discovery of the perpetrators of the outrage committed in the attack 
upon that vessel, and that letters from Hillsborough to the Governor 
and Company of Rhode Island, to the Lords of the Admiralty, Admiral 
Montagu, and General Gage, upon this subject, should be recalled and 
cancelled. 

Copy. 2 J folio pages. No. 2 is in duplicate. 

Stephen Sayre to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

.1772, August 20, Thursday. Berners Street, No. 38. — Relative to 
the grant of 1,500/. voted to the late Mr. De Berdt, Agent of Massachu- 
setts Bay. by that Province. Lord Hillsborough having thought fit to 
prevent this vote from passing, De Berdt's family is much inconvenienced 
thereby, as the greater part of this sum had been expended in prosecuting 
the public business. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



89 

Dennis de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 21. London. — On his father's death he drew out an 
account of the salary and disbursements due from the House of 
Representatives in Boston to him as their Agent, and they passed a 
vote on 2 July 1771 to remit to his executors 1,400/. The Governor 
having received instructions to refuse this vote, the money remains 
unpaid. Hopes Lord Dartmouth will grant this decision to be altered, 
and the money paid. 

Letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. De Berdt. Money voted in Massachusetts Bay. 



" Gaspee " Enquiry. 

1772, August 21. St, James's. — Order in Council. 
Copy. 2jj folio pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 3. Copy of an Order in Council, 21st August 1772 
Directing the Attorney and Sollicitor General to prepare the-Dra* 
of a Com 11 of inquiry in Rhode Island; and also Dra* of a Pro- 
clamation. 

Another copy follows. 



Thomas Taylor to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 21. Alnwick. — Went to America five years ago, and 
whilst there inspected very narrowly the provinces of New York, the 
Jerseys, Pensylvania, and Maryland. Remarks on the commercial 
relations between England and America. Relates his services in the 
war of 1 745. Hopes he may be appointed to some office in America. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mr. Taylor of Alnwick. 

Endorsed on wrapper : — B 25. Mr. Taylor, Alnwick, Aug st 21st, 
1772, requesting an employment. 



John Willday to Lord Dartmouth, Secretary of State for 
the Colony s in London. 

1772, August 22. Atherstone, Warwickshire. 
Letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Willday of Atherstone on American Trade. C — 24. 



Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 26. Brighthelmstone. — Recommends to his favour and 
protection Samuel Wharton, concerned with Mr. Walpole, himself, and 
others in the dew grant upon the Ohio. Speaks of Wharton as thoroughly 
conversant in American affairs, and having a great connexion in that 
country. His ideas are truly British, and he is well acquainted with 
Indian affairs. 

Autograph letter signed, 2J quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— A 3b. S r M. Fetherstone. 26 Aug st 1772. Mr. 
Wharton. 



90 

" Gaspee " Enquiry. 

1772, August 26. St. James's. — Order iii Council. The King 
approves of the commission of inquiry and the proclamation to be issued 
for apprehending the persons concerned in the burning of the " Gaspee " 
schooner. General Gage and Admiral Montagu to give all assistance 
possible in this affair. 

Original, signed Stephen Cottrell, sealed. 4 J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Order in Council. 26th August 1772. 
Copy of the foregoing. 

John Poavnall to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1772, August 26. — Sends the warrant to the Attorney and Solicitor 
General to prepare a commission of inquiry for his signature. Encloses 
with it two Orders in Council and draft of Proclamation. Will send 
the rest of the papers on this subject to-morrow, 

Autograph letter signed. 3 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Pownall. 26 August 1772. 

Andrew Re a to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 26. Grigsby's Coffee House, Royal Exchange, London. 
— Relates his services in the late war. Owing to commercial failure 
he is now in adverse circumstances, and would be glad of some 
appointment. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B 24. Mr. Rea. 26th August 1772. Desiring an office. 
Mr. And r Rea. 

Enclosures : — 

The Earl of Hillsborough to [Lord Mountmorris]. 

1772, July 8. Hanover Square. — Very few offices are under his 
patronage, and he is unable to assist Mr Rea. 
Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

A[ndrew] R[ea] to the [Earl of Hillsborough]. 

1772, July 16. — Asks for a recommendatory letter to any of the 
Governors in America to appoint him a sheriff of any of the 
counties under their Government, or any other employ. 
Autograph letter signed " A. JR." 2 quarto pages. 

David Blissett to the Reverend Mr. Talbot. 

1772, August 27. Reading. — Asks that his friend Mr. Irving may 
succeed Mr. Ellis as King's Agent for West Florida. The latter having 
been ill some time, Mr. Irving has proved, by doing his work for the 
last eighteen months, his ability to succeed him. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed .—A 33. Mr. Blissett to Rev. Mr. Talbot. Mr. Irving to 
succeed Mr. Ellis. 27 Aug. 1772. 



91 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 27. Whitehall. — Sends all the despatches relative to 
the Rhode Island business requiring his Lordship's signature, also draft 
of the instructions proposed to attend the Commission of Inquiry. Will 
send papers on other matters to-morrow. Hopes none will be of 
sufficient importance to bring him to town. Encloses copy of letter 
just received from Admiral Montagu. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Pownall. 27 August 1772. 



Thomas Wilson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 27. Leicester Street. — Promises diligent service in any 
office to which Lord Dartmouth may appoint him. 
Letter signed. l£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Thomas Wilson. 27th August 1772. V. Cor., p. 4. 
Ent. 

Mr. Wilson & Lord Hillsborough, Chief Justice of New York. 

Enclosure : — 

The Earl of Hillsborough to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 25. Hanover Square. — Recommends Mr. Wilson 
for the Chief Justiceship of New York, with salary of 600/. or 
800/. a year. Considers him the most deserving man for this 
post y which will soon be vacant. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — A 50. Earl of Hillsborough, Hanover Square, 
25th Augs 1772. Recommending Mr. Wilson. V. Cor., 
p. 2. Entd. 



Edward Thurlow and Alexander Wedderburn. Report to 

the King. 

1772, August 28. — Have taken into their consideration the several 
papers relative to the burning of the " Gaspee " schooner, and pre- 
pared the draft of a Commission to inquire into the circumstances 
attending it, and a Proclamation for the said affair. 

Copy. 3 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 5. Copy of the Attorney & Solicitor General's 
Report. 28 Aug* 1772. 

Extract of the foregoing without date or signatures. 



John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 29, Saturday evening. — The "Gaspee" business is ot 
such importance, both in itself and in the consequences it may have, 
that if Lord Dartmouth has any difficulty with the papers, he hopes he 
will come to town before the despatches leave the office, as I here will 
if sufficient time 1o allow of that. The Attorney General considers 
this business of "five times the magnitude of the Stamp Act." 



92 

The despatches to be sent to Hutchinson and Cramahe are of such- 
delicacy that he will send drafts of them by another messenger to his 
Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed, o quarto pages. 

Endorsed :—M T Pownall, Aug. 29, 1772. 

Lord Viscount Gage to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 30. Fife. — Desires his friend M r Kemble to have the 
office in America now held by M r Morgan. 
Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed on first page : — L d Gage M r Kemble. 

„ „ wrapper : — A 49. Lord Viscount Gage. August 30 th 

1772, recommending M r Kemble, v. Cor. p. 4 & 5. Ent d . 

The Duke op Manchester to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, August 30. Spa. — Solicits attention to his brother Lord 
Montagu's memorial showing that he has served as Governor of South 
Carolina for several years greatly to the prejudice of his health and. 
fortune. Suggest a removal to a less disadvantageous post and com- 
pensation for expenses if such is not an unreasonable proposal. M r 
Williamos, who is well versed in American affairs, delivers this letter. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A 57. Duke of Manchester. 30 August 1772. In 
behalf of his Brother. D. of Manchester. L d Cha. Montagu. 

John Osborn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, August 30. Dresden. — Has received by the last post from 
England news of Lord Dartmouth's appointment as Secretary of State 
for the Colonies. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — J. Osborn Esq r (private) M r Osborn Dresden, 30 th 
Aug sfc 1772. Congratulations on Lord Dartmouth's Appointm*. 

[Lord Dartmouth] to the Governor and Company of Ehode 

Island. 

1772, August. Whitehall. — Transmits copy of the Attorney and 
Solicitor General's report upon the burning of the " Gaspee V schooner. 
Instructions for their proceeding in this matter. His Majesty's 
opinion of the case. He expects all persons within the Colony to exert 
themselves in order to bring the offenders to justice. 

1£ pages. 

Endorsed: — Dra* to the Gov r and Company of Rhode Island (N° ) 
August 1772. 

The King to Governor Joseph Wanton, Daniel Horsmanden, 
Frederick Smyth, Petek Oliver, and Robert Auchmltty. 

1772, September 2. Westminster. — Commission authorizing them to 
inquire into and report upon the circumstances relative to the attacking,, 
taking, plundering, and burning of the schooner " Gaspee." 

Copy. 4£ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 7. Copy of the Commission. 



93 

Rodolph Valltravers to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 2. Somerset Chapel, Strand. — Submits the enclosed 
memorial to his Lordship's judgment. 

Autograph letter signed, I quarto page. 

Endorsed: — C — 22. M r Valtravers Plan for procuring Protestants 
from Germany to settle in America. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to the King. 

1772, September 2. London. — Signed J. Rodolph de Valltravers 
(sic) . Offers his services to procure from the Protestant parts 
of Poland, Germany, and Switzerland useful colonists to settle 
in America. 

Original. 2 folio pages. 



Noel Hill to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 3. Tern. — Recommends M r Pitman to Lord Dart- 
mouth's favour as Lord Hillsborough promised some provision should 
be made for him. Refers him to M r Pownall who is well acquainted 
with previous applications made on behalf of M r Pitman. 

A copy of Lord Dartmouth's reply, dated 14 September is on the 
reverse, stating that he has many similar applications on hand, and will 
attend to this when opportunity arises. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— A 48. Noel Hill Esq. Tern. Sept. 3 d 1772, recom- 
mending M r Pitman, v. Cor. p. 5 & 6. Ent d . Noel Hill Esq r , 
, M r Pitman. 

Enclosure : — 

Captain Frederick Cobbe Pitman to Lord Dartmouth. 

Memorial. Relates his services in North America and India. 
Is now in distressed circumstances and asks for some employ - 
ment in America. 
1 page. 

Endorsed : — No. 18. Memorial of Capt Pit?nan, requesting 
an Employmt in North America. In Noel Hill's Esq of 
Sept r 3 d 1772, v. mem. p. 1. E?it d - Memorial of Fred k 
Cobbe Pitman Late Captain. In the East India Company s 
Service. 



John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 3, at midnight. — Is much perplexed over an estate 
in consequence of the death of a relation. Sends with some enclosed 
letters the Instructions for the Commissioners appointed to investigate 
in the " Gaspee " affair. Remarks on them. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Pownall, 3 d Sept. 1772. 



94 

Lord Dartmouth to Governor Joseph Wanton. 

1772, September 4. Whitehall. — No. 1. Containing the King's 
directions to inquire into the circumstances attending the outrage on 
the " Gaspee " schooner. 

Draft. 9| pages. [Similar drafts in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 201, fos. 279 and 373.] 

Endorsed .— Dra* to Gov r Wanton. 4 th Sept r 1772. (No. 1.) 
Ent d . 

Copy of the foregoing. 



The King to Governor Joseph Wanton, Daniel Horsmanden, 
Frederick Smyth, Peter Oliver and Robert Auchmuty. 

1772, September 4. St. James's. — Instructions to inquire into the 
" Gaspee " affair. 

Copy. [5f folio pages. Draft is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 201, fo. 389.] 

Endorsed : — No. 6. Copy of Instructions to the Commissioners of 
Inquiry in Rhode Island 4 Sept. 1772. 



Captain Archibald Blane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 6. Reading. — Desiring to be appointed to one of 
the Governments to be settled on the Ohio. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— B 26. Cap n Blane 6 th Aug 3t 1772 for Ohio Govern- 
ment. 

Enclosures : — 

Colonel Henry Bouquet to Lieutenant Archibald Blane 
commanding at Ligonier. 

1763, July 4. Carlisle, North America. — Commends him for 
his bravery in defending his post. Those who agreed to stay 
with him shall be rewarded. Is ashamed of those who so 
treacherously abandoned him* Had Lieutenants Christy and 
Gordon behaved with the same courage as Blane their 
important posts would not have been lost nor Christy and his 
garrison massacred. Importance of his post for support of 
Fort Pitt. Sends a reinforcement. 

Copy in Blane' s hand. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy Col 1 Bouquet's letter, July 4 th 1763. 

Lord Barrington to Captain Archibald Blane. 

1772, September 3. Cavendish Square. — If a Governor is 
appointed on the Ohio, considers he deserves such an appoint- 
ment, but the application must be made to Lord Dartmouth. 
Copy in B lane's hand. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Copy of Lord Barrington' s Letter, SepV 3 d 
1772. 



95 

Captain Archibald Blane to Lord Dartmouth. 

1 772, September 6. Reading. — Memorial. First part begins " That 
your Memorialist served the whole of last war in North America" 
After this comes a memorandum, then the 2 nd part begins : 
" My other Services in that Part of the World, and which I now 
have the honour to lay before your Lordship are" fyc. fyc, the 
first part being copy of what was written in December 1764 or 
January 1765 to Welbore Ellis. 
Autograph copy. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Captain Blane* s Memorial. Sept r 6 th 1772. 

John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 6, Sunday Evening £ past nine. — The despatches 
on the " Gaspee " business are about to be sent off. As this affair has 
been misrepresented in the newspapers he has suggested to Mr. Eden 
that a notification of the Commission and the Proclamation should be 
there made. Death of Lord Hawley, Lieutenant Governor of Antigua; 
this appointment is in Lord Dartmouth's patronage. Encloses the 
papers he ordered. Is leaving London to-morrow. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal {broken). 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— M* Pownall 6 th Sept. 1772. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 7. Rochester. — M r Eden's surprise that Lord 
Dartmouth had not kissed the Queen's hand upon taking the Seals. 
Such conduct was considered extraordinary. As some importance may 
be attached to this matter, he mentions it in a friendly way to his 
Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :—W Pownall 17 th Sept. 1772. 

William Knox to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 8. Whitehall. — Fears that the proceedings related 
in the despatches will lead to a war with the Indians. Apologizes for 
omitting to send two papers on the " Gaspee " affair. Encloses one, the 
other will follow. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— M v Knox. 8 th Sept. 1773 (sic). 

Henry Basset to Lord [Scarsdale]. 

1772, September 10. Detroit. — With a slip of paper on which is 
written "To Captain Basset Major to the 10 th Regiment at Detroit 
by New York to be forwarded by General Gage." Refers to a letter in 
which he desired his Lordship's influence with Lord Hillsborough to 
get him appointed Governor of Detroit. Necessity there appears 
to be for a Governor. Should this not .succeed, proposes that he be 
appointed Surveyor General of the lands and woods and Receiver of the 
quit rents of Detroit and its dependencies. Has been an officer nearly 
thirty years. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 



Lord Dartmouth to Captain Archibald Blane. 

1772, September 10. Sandwell. — la answer to his letter of 6 Sep- 
tember. When the settlement is decided upon, his application will 
be attended to, though he fears he can give him but little encourage- 
ment. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



Lord Dartmouth to Lord Viscount Gage. 

1772, September 10. Sandwell. — In answer to his of 30 August, 
states that he cannot give M r Kemble any encouragement to accept of 
a deputation from M r Morgan in the hope of succeeding to his office in 
America. 

Autograph copy signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Ent d . 



John More to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 10. Rothimurchus. — Is " importuned by two 
hundred families in this and the neighbouring parishes, to intreat of 
your Grace to let them have the encouragement given by Government 
(if any) for settling in North America." 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Scotch Families desiring to be transplanted to America. 



Monsieur Lavanchy to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1772, 7bre 11. a Utrecht. — Setting forth his ideas with reference to 
making new settlements on the rivers Ohio and Mississippi. 
Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — C — 34. M r ons. (sic) Lavanchy Ohio Settlemt &c. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 19. Whitehall. — Receipt of letters from America. 
Fears an Indian war will result from the barbarous murders committed 
on them, and considers stringent measures should be taken to bring the 
perpetrators to justice. West Indian affairs. 

Autograph letter signed. A\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— M r Pownall 19 Sept. 1772. 

Sir James Wright, Baronet, to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 22. Venice. — 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — S r James Wright Venice 22 d Sept. 1772. Congratu- 
lations. 



97 

The Earl of Rochford to Lord Dartmouth. 

^1772, September 23. St. James's. — Hopes he will be able to attend 
the Cabinet on Wednesday the 7th October, if not, any resolutions then 
passed will be forwarded to him. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:—^, of Rochford 23 Sep r 1772 (private). 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

[1772], September 27, \ past 1 p.m. Sunday. — Difficulty he foresees 
in Colonel Dalrymple being made a Major- General for the purpose of 
assuming the duties carried on by Governor Leyborne in the expedition 
against the Caribs. The placing military persons over the chief 
Governor in America, has already been complained of in Parliament in 
the case of General Gage. Further observations on the subject. With 
this is an autograph copy of Lord Dartmouth's answer. 

Autograph letter signed. 5£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—Mr Pownall 27 Sept. 1772. 

Charles Williamos to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 28. Dover Street. — Sends a letter from the Duke 
•of Manchester and a memorial from his brother relative to his dis- 
agreeable situation in America. Encloses considerations. His services 
in the Customs at Jamaica having been detrimental to health and 
fortune, he seeks for the appointment of Naval Officer at New York. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 folio pages. 

Endorsed :— B 29 M r Williamos 28 th Sept. 1772, desiring an 
Appointment. 

Enclosure : — 

Considerations on the Cidture of Vines, Olive, and other Trees in 
North America ivith a Plan for carrying such Culture into 
execution. 

Autograph. 9 quarto pages. 

Lord EdgcUxMbe to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, September 29. Mount Edgcumbe. — Recommends to his notice 
William Pepperell, grandson and heir to the General who took Louis- 
burgh. Advises the bestowal of this favour as he has large family 
connections and they will then be more likely to support his Lordship's 
measures. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A 32. Lord Edgcumbe 29 Sept. 1772, recommending 
M r W m Pepperell. Lord Edgcumbe. 

The Earl of Rochford to Sir William Trelawny, Baronet. 

1772, October 1. Whitehall—The 50 th Regiment from Ireland and 
part of 60 th from North America to go to Jamaica and the 36 th and 
66 th to come to Europe. 

Copy. | folio page. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Rochford to Sir 
William Trelawny, Bar*, dated Whitehall, Oct 1 ' l«t 1772. 

y 82140. G 



98 

Lord Scarsdale to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, October 6. Kidleston. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. With Lord Dartmouth's 
answer dated Sand well 12 October promising to take the request into 
consideration. 

Endorsed: — A 53. Lord Scarsdale. Kidleston, Oct. 6 th 1772. 

Recommending M r Bassett. V. Cor. p. 1-2. Ent d . 
Again endorsed : — L d Scarsdale M r Basset Detroit. 

Enclosures : — 

Captain Henry Basset to Lord [Scarsdale], 

1772, May 1. Quebec. — Sets out for Detroit on the 5 th instant, to 
command the Fort and garrison there. Desires to be appointed 
Lieutenant- Governor of Detroit. 
Autograph letter signed. 1| pages. 

Endorsed: — In Lord Scarsdale' 's of Oct. 6, 1772. 1. 

Captain Henry Basset to Lord [Scarsdale]. 

1772, June 29. Detroit. — Entreats his Lordship to influence the 
Secretary of State to make him Lieutenant-Governor of this 
place. Arrived here with the troops under his command on the 
23 rd instant. On the way met an Indian trader who had just 
brought in the scalps of eight Indians. A Governor is much 
wanted as there are no regular police. Mentions seeds he sent 
his Lordship last year. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — In Lord Scarsdale' s of Oct. 6, 1772. 2. 

John Pownall to Lieutenant General Thomas Gage. 

1772, October 7. Whitehall. — Receipt of his N° 76. The regu- 
lations for civil Government proposed by the Inhabitants of the Illinois 
were not enclosed in General Gage's dispatch as stated. West India 
affairs. 

Draft. \\ pages. 

Endorsed .— Dra* to Lieu* Gen 1 Gage Whitehall 7 th Octo r 1772. 
J. P. 

John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 8. Whitehall. — Sends copies of all the letters signed 
by the other secretary during his absence. Difficulties he has had to 
encounter with Lords Rochford and Suffolk in the business concerning 
the relief of troops. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Pownall 8 Oct. 1772. 

Relief of Troops. 

[1772, October 8.] Not dated, but see Povvnall's letter above. — 
Memorandum relative to the business in connection with the relief of 
troops going to or returning from America. 

3 1 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — In N° 1 Domes t. 



99 

Deer Island Settlers to John Calef. 

1772, October 9. — Authority to act as their Agent. Authorising 
him to present a petition to the King, for a grant of this Island. 
Sixty signatures. 

Copy. 1 folio page. 

J. Mallet to Doctor William Hunter in Wind-Mill Street, 

London. 

1772, October 9. New York. — Governor Tryon assures him he will 
do nothing to the detriment of the lands in question. Hopes the lady 
will be able to get a grant of these lands, under the great seal and free 
of quit rents. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — In B — 12. 

Fox Island Settlers to John Calef. 

1772, October 9. — Authority to act as their Agent. Authorising 
him to present their petition to the King for a grant of this Island. 
Twenty-five signatures. 

Copy. 1 folio page. 

Settlers in Fox Island, county of Lincoln, Massachusetts, 

to the King. 

1772, October 9. — Petition. Stating the circumstances under which 
they have subsisted on this island, and asking for a grant of it, instead 
of being turned off with their families into the wilderness. Twenty 
signatures. 

Original. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Pet n Fox Island. 



John Thornton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 14. Clapham. — "I must trouble your Lordship to 
execute the inclosed full power & to send it to Baron Smythe. I have 
been some time 'in disburse for D r Wheelock's Schools and shall have 
more to pay soon." Thanks for his reply concerning his nephew 
Knipe. Recommends Thomas Rennard in America to his notice 
for some suitable employment there. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—A 56. M r Thornton M r Knipe M r Rennard in N. 
America 14 Oct. 1772. 



John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, October 17. Chandos Street, Cavendish Square. — His in- 
disposition. Finds there are many letters and papers in the Department 
of Secretary of State requiring Lord Dartmouth's serious attention, and 
two or three needing the consideration of the Cabinet. Transmits a 
note with its enclosures just. received from Sir Stanier Porten. 

Autograph letter signed. 1J quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Pownall 17 Oct. 1772. 

G 2 



100 

The Eeverend Bernard Page to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 19. London. — Represents the necessity of keeping 
the families on the lands lying upon the Susquehannah River. If some 
relief is not granted many must die of want before the spring. When he 
left them they had nothing but a small allowance of potatoes. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Rev d M r Page. 19 Oct. 1772, inclosing a Letter from 

Lady Huntingdon. 
Also endorsed : — Rev d M r Page & Lady Huntingdon. 

Enclosures : — 

Petition to the King. 

Petition of Sixty Fathers of distressed Families. 
3f large pages. 

Endorsed :—-N° 22. The humble Petition of Sixty Fathers 
of most distressed Families residing at Fort Augusta in the 
province of Pennsylvania, and in the Jerseys in North 
America ; Husbandmen. By the hand of Bernard Page, 
Clerk, requesting the Re-possession of Lands from which 
they have been driven, after many Contests, about Wyoming 
on the Bach of Pensylvania, and that they might be more 
immediately under the Royal Protection in their Persons 
and Properties, SfC V. mem. p. 11. Ent d . 

Lady S. Huntingdon to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, September 21. London. — Recommending M r Page and 
desiring help may be granted to the people living on lands 
upon the Susquehannah river. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages, 

Richard Cracraft to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 20. Philpot Lane — Distress of the Moheagau Indians 
and their agents, owing to the delay of judgment in the controversy 
between them and Connecticut in 1770. Serious consequences that will 
follow if it is not speedily settled. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— M r Cracraft Moheagan Cause. M r Cracraft 20 th Oct. 
1772. In behalf of the Moheagan Indians. 



'£>■ 



Enclosure : — 

Moheagan Indians. Petition to the King. 

By John Mason. Relate their sufferings from encroachments on 
their lands by the Colonists. Desire permission to move to a 
fresh settlement betzveen the Falls of the Ohio and the entrance 
of the Mississippi, and there to receive the Ring's protection. 
Offer this petition by Mason, who is their chief guardian and 
trustee in all their transactions ivith Government. 
2 i pages. 

Endorsed :-—No. 36. Petition of the Moheagan Indians. 
Cracraft, 



101 

William Samuel Johnson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 20. Stratford iu Connecticut. — Congratulations upon 
Lord Dartmouth's appointment as Secretary of State. His friends 
having suggested that he be appointed Chief Justice of New York, 
states the pleasure such an office would give him and mentions several 
people in London who would recommend him for it. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— B. 30. Oct r 20, 1772. D r Johnson desiring a Law- 
Office. 



General Phineas Lyman to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 21. Suffield. — Considers Lord Dartmouth's ap- 
pointment will greatly help to restore harmony between England 
and America. Remarks on his plan to form a settlement on the 
Mississippi. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken) . 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — B 31. 21 Oct r 1772. Gen 1 Lyman desiring some 
Attention for his Services. 



Deposition of John Beath. 

1772, October 23. Lincoln Island.— Before Thomas Bice and John 
Stinson J. P. Details the circumstances under which he obtained a 
settlement at Pemaquid under Colonel Dunbar acting by commission 
from George IL Shews how unjustly they have been turned off and 
their sufferings in consequence. 

Original. 1 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 4. Beath. John Beath's Deposition. 



Samuel M c Cobb, William Moore and William Fullerton. 

Depositions. 

1772, October 23. Lincoln Island. — Before Thomas Bice and John 
Stinson J.P. Recounting how they settled on lands East of Kennebeck 
River. That Col. Dunbar offered to give them the deeds of these lands, 
but the execution was. delayed and in 1733 he was removed to New 
Hampshire. Their sufferings from the Indians etc. In 1764 they were 
legally incorporated into a town by the name of Boothbay, and, though 
poor, they have built a church, paid the public charges of Government 
and proved themselves loyal subjects of George III. 

Origina I. 2§ folio pages. 

Endorsed:-— Samuel M c Cobb, W m More & W m Fullerton's Deposi- 
tion. No. 1, 2, 3, M c Cobb Moore Fullerton. 



The Reverend William Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 24. Jamaica Plain. — Details of a conversation 
lately held with Thomas Cushing on American affairs. " He assured 
me that the Colonists would not be fully satisfied till matters were 
brought back to the state in which they were before the stamp act." 
The right of Parliament to regulate trade was admitted, as also to- 



102 

appropriate the sums arising therefrom, but not to raise a revenue. 
The conversation turned on what would be an immediate gratification 
and put the General Court into good humour, on which the Speaker 
mentioned the removal of the troops, the restoration of the castle to the 
care of the Colony, instructions to be given to the Governor to sign 
tax bills without any exception in favour of commissioners etc. and 
the leaving it to the General Court to provide for the Judges. M r 
Gordon thinks the removal of the troops would be a good thing ; he 
continues : — " I had the honour of dining with the Governor at his 
table, the day his Excellency prorogued the Assembly and refused 
signing the tax bill in virtue of the instruction received a few days 
before, and had an opportunity of observing the disgust, and of knowing 
the sentiments of some of his warmest friends, who could not refrain 
from mentioning that they hoped the Assembly would never agree to 
make the proposed exception let the consequences be as they would." 
Governor Bernard's former imprudence with the Council. 
Autograph letter signed. ] ^ pages. 

Endorsed :— Oct r 24, 1772. Kev d M r Gordon Boston. 

William Gerard dk Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 27. London. — Relates his zealous services to 
Government for 21 years. Complains of conduct of Governor Grant 
by whom he was condemned and ordered to England in 1771. Remarks 
on his surveys. Desires restoration to his office, and proper encourage- 
ment in the service. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — M r De Brahm. 



Lieutenant Governor Andrew Oliver to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 30. Boston. — Congratulations. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed :— Is o. 3. Boston Oct r 39, 1772. L* Gov r Oliver. R/ 
6 th Dec r . 



Cortland Skinner, Attorney- General of New Jersey, to 
Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, October 30. Perth Amboy. — Memorial. Having held the 
office of Attorney General of New Jersey for upwards of eighteen years, 
desires an increase of salary. 

Original. \\ folio pages. [A signed duplicate is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 195, fo. 17.] 

Endorsed: — No. 5. Memorial C. Skinner Esq r Att.Gen. N. Jersey 
Gen 1 Fitzroy. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1772, October.] — The possessors of large territories in North 
America generally lay out their tracts in several hundred lo's, reserve 
some as a favourable place for themselves, then let every third or fourth 
lot by lease to tenants at a certain annual rent. If Lord Dartmouth 
approves, he *»an easily find thirteen good French Protestant families 



103 

willing to go and cultivate bis lands in East Florida. Suggests names. 
By this means his Lordship's lands would be settled in less than twenty 
years with honest, industrious, experienced and religious tenants. 
Encloses two original letters received from M r and M rs Roux. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed .—C — 37. M r De Brahm (without Date) relative to the 
Purchase of American Lands. 

Enclosures : — 

Madame Roux to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1772, H bre 6. Merges. — Thanks for kindness to her husband c^nd 
sons. Hopes to meet de Brahm in America. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. '6 quarto pages. In 
French. 

Monsieur Roux to [William Gerard de Brahm]. 

N. D. [1772, October^. — Solicits his interest to procure him a 
grant of 6,000 acres in America. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. In French. 

John Calef to the King. 

N. D. [1772, October], — Memorial in behalf of the Proprietors of 
Twelve Townships lying in the Territory of Sagadahock : Granted to 
James Duncan and others, by the Province of Massachusetts-Bay. 
Repeats a petition presented in 1763 to the King shewing that the 
territory of Sagadahock and the adjacent islands were granted to the 
inhabitants of Massachusetts Bay by Willi.'im and Mary, and desiring 
him to coufirm it. This petition was referred to the Board of Trade 
which considered the advisability of such a step being taken, but since 
17 July 1764 nothing more has been done. Desires a speedy settlement 
either by confirmation of former grants, or by erecting the district into a 
separate province, as the inhabitants are at present in great distress 
because of this uncertainty. 

Original. 7 ^ folio pages. 

"A Londoner" to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, October. — Congratulations. Entreats him to watch his two 
secretaries who " carry with them into office, all the injurious and 
illiberal Ideas, and Enmity s t publick and personal, of their late Lord, 
and will insidiously labour, to possess your Lordship, with their private 
Prejudices and Resentments." Warns him of the consequences of 
slighting this admonition, which comes from one who loves him 
cordially. 

letter signed. 3 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Anonymous Oct r 1772 C — 32. 

Ohio Settlement. 

1772, October. — Observations on the new Settlement on the Ohio, 
addressed to Lord Dartmouth. Exposes the difficulty of communication 
for the purposes of trade. Believes that the settlers would shortly 
become " tartars or savages ;" ridicules the notion of silk culture ami 



104 

concludes that the people would be lost to Britain in a commercial 
view. 

Original. 3f quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Oct 1 ' 1772 Anonymous Ohio Settlement — 36. 

Sagadahock and Penobscot Rivers. 

1772, October. — A General account of the Country Eastward of the 
River Sagadahock in the Province of Massachusetts Bay in New 
England, and an account of the settlements East of the Penobscot 
River. Gives names of places granted, and of grantees. Remarks 
and observations. 

3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — A General Account of the Territory of Sagadahock 
N. England. 



■&' 



A duplicate follows. 



The Duke of Manchester to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1772, November 2. Paris. — Considers his brother Lord Montagu 
has served Government well in South Carolina, and he wishes now to> 
be removed to a more congenial climate. Mentions Barbadoes if Lord 
Dartmouth has not decided on a more suitable person for that 
Government. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— A 39. Duke of Manchester. 2 d Nov r 1772 recom- 
mending his Brother. 

Again endorsed : — Duke of Manchester. 



Lord Dartmouth to Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage. 

1772, November 4. Whitehall. — The state of the Illinois district 
requires serious consideration. Quarrel with the Chickasaws at 
Kaskaskias is a very unlucky event. 

Copy. \\ folio pages. [Draft is in the Public Record Office,, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 128, fo. 145.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to 
Lieut: Gen 1 Gage, dated Whitehall 4 th Nov r 1772. 



The Reverend James Alice to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, November 5. Paisley. — Solicits his assistance with regard to 
the act passed in Pennsylvania concerning the manner of swearing in 
lav courts. As the King and Council have a negative over the laws 
made by the Governor and Provincial Assembly the Rev. ¥ra, Marshel 
of Philadelphia desires him to try and procure an interest with some 
of the nobility, who can be of service to prevent the repeal of this 
Act. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Rev d M r Alice of Pensylvauia. 



105 

Board of Trade. Minutes. 

1772, November 5. Plantation Office. — Concerning the Indians and 
lands and debts in Georgia. 
Original. 1^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Minutes of the Board of Trade 5 Nov r 1772. 

Judge Robert R. Livingston to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, November 5. New York. — Complains of the conduct of the 
New York General Assembly in excluding him from a seat in the 
Assembly, though live times elected representative for the Manor of 
Livingston, the pretence being that " No Judge of the Supreme Court 
should sit or vote in the House." Recounts his services as judge of the 
Supreme Court of the Province since 1763. Refers to M r Wooldridge 
as able to confirm all he has stated. 

Copy. 5 folio pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 182, fo. 883.] 

Endorsed: — B 20 Judge Livingston New York. 5 th Nov 1 ' 1772. 

Philip Skene to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, November 7. Skenesborough in the County of Charlotte. — 
Introducing the bearer, Mr. Hawley, who was amongst the first settlers 
under the faith of a New Hampshire grant, and who has been appointed 
by the members of the Church of England agent to represent their 
case in the mother-country. Daily disputes, often attended with riots, 
had occurred between the proprietors under New York and New 
Hampshire, until Governor Tryon took the measures he did. He 
(Skene) has one of the first grants in Charlotte county under the New 
York government.. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — No. 1. M r Skene N. Hampshire recomms M r Hawley 
7 th Nov r 1772. 



Board of Trade. Representation to the King. 

1772, November 9. Whitehall.— With Appendix consisting of : — 

Schedule of the following Papers. 9 November 1772. 

A. Memorial of Governor Wright to the Earl of Hillsborough.. 

[November 1771.] 

B. Governor James Wright. List of Papers relative to his 

Memorial about Indian Affairs. [November 1771 ] 

No. 1 Cherokee Indians. Cession of lands to Indian 

Traders in Payment of Debts. 22 February 1771. 
No. 2. Talk from Judd's Friend, an Indian, to Captain 

John Stuart at a Convention of the Over Hills Cherokee 

Chiefs and beloved Men. 7 March '1771. 
No. 3. Cherokee Indian Talk to Governor James Wright. 

3 May 1771. 
No. 4. Governor James Wright to the Cherokee Indians. 

23 May 1771. 
No. 5. Upper Creek Indian Talk to Governor Wright. 

1 May 1771. With note of Philemon Kemp transmitting 

the talk 6 June. 



106 

No. 6. Governor James Wright. Talk to the Upper 

Creek Indians. 25 June 1771. 
No. 7. Cherokee Indian Talk at a Meeting near Fort 

Charlotte. 8 June 1771. 
No. 8. Indian Traders in the Creek and Cherokee Nations 

(George Galphin, James Jackson, ahd nine others). 

Memorial to Governor Wright. [November 1771.] 

C. London Merchants, trading to and interested in the Province 

of Georgia. Memorial to the Board of Trade. 

D. Memorandum only of a Map describing the lands proposed to 

be ceded by the Creeks and Cherokees. 

Copy. 1\\ folio pages. [Original is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 233, fo. 327.] 

Endorsed: — No. 1. (Copy.) Representation of the Lords of Trade 
upon the Proposition of Gov 1 * Wright, for a Cession of Land from 
the Creek & Cherokee Indians Whitehall 9 th No v r 1772. 

MONTFORT BROAVNE. MEMORIAL to LORD DARTMOUTH. 

1772, November 10. — Recounts his services, sufferings and losses. 
Original. 2 large pages, 

Endorsed: — No. 17. Memorial of Montfort Browne Esq r , requesting 
an Appointment to a Government in North America. V. Mem. 
p. 2. Ent d . 

Enclosures : — 

The Earl of Hillsborough to Montfort Browne. 

1772, August 25. Hanover Square. — Is grieved that his resigna- 
tion of office will prevent him from compensating Browne for his 
losses and ill-treatment at Pensacola. Apologizes for not writing 
to his friend at New Grove. 
Copy. 1 quarto page. 

Civil Government on the Mississippi. 

Reasons for the immediate Establishment of a Civil Government in 
the British Dominions adjoining the River Mississippi in North 
America. With foot notes containing application from some 
French at Pensacola to Governor Browne and extract of a 
Report of Engineer Cambel to the Government, all undated. 
Printed. 4 large pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 6. Reasons For the immediate Establishment 
of a Civil Government in the British Dominions adjoining 
to the River Mississippi in North America. 

Charles Turner to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, November 11. Kirkleatham. — The delay in attending to the 
enclosed petition, has necessitated the petitioner borrowing 300/. from 
him and others. 

Autograph letter signed. J quarto page. 

Endorsed: — A 43. Charles Turner Esq r . Kirkleatham near N° 
Allerton, Nov r 11 th 1772, recommending M r Hird's Case. V. Cor. 
p. 10-9 Ent d . 



107 

Enclosures : — 

James Hird to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, November 10. Kirkleatham near N° Allerton. — Renews his 
application on behalf of his son, who is now at New York without 
employment but is wilting to go to any part of North America 
or the West Indies and able to undertake any service given him. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— In M r Turner's of 11 Nov r 1772. 

James Hird to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, July \6. — Petition. With certificate of Charles Turner as 
to the veracity of the petition. Stating that his son sailed for 
New York in August 1770 where he settled till May 1771 when 
Gage appointed him Barrack Master of Nova Scotia. In 
January 1772 he was deprived of this office by a M r Morden 
and since then has been unable to maintain himself and family. 
Autograph copy. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:— In Mr C. Turner's of Nov* W h 1772. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1772, November 12, Thursday (received from the Earl of Rochford 
for Lord Dartmouth's use). — Sketch of the points to be taken into 
consideration with reference to the present situation of England with 
France. " England has not a single friendly power or ally to boast of." 
France, Spain and the Italian States are united in the south, and in the 
north, Russia, Prussia and Vienna are joining in the dismemberment of 
Poland. Russia is on the eve of a war with the Porte and will then 
attack Sweden. 

6f folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Cabinet. For Lord Dartmouth's Use. 

[Board of Trade] Minutes. 

1772, November 9, 12 and 16. — Concerning M r Hocquart's Claim 

to Gros Macatinat. Lands on Lake Champlain. New Hampshire 
grants, etc. 

2^ folio pages. 

[Board of Trade] Minutes. 

1772, November 18. — Two papers, one not dated. The first refers 
to fees in New York and Virginia, the Governor of the first having 
12/. 10*. for every 1,000 Acres. The second relates to the recovery of 
debts in New Hampshire and New Jersey and to Charters for 
Massachusetts Bay. 

1 folio page and 1 quarto page respectively. 

Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, November 24. New York. — Congratulations. The New 
England provinces rejoice at his appointment and anticipate the full 
enjoyment of civil and religious liberty. Encloses a letter and some 
verses from Philln Wheatley, a negress, to Lord Dartmouth. [Query 



108 

tor these enclosures see the Eleventh Report of the Royal Commission, 
Appendix, Part V., page 334.] 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Woldridge N. York, Nov. 24, 1772. 

Settlers on Southern Fox Island to John Calef. 

1772, November 25. — Authority from the settlers on Southern Fox 
Island, Lincoln County, Massachusetts, to John Calef to act as their 
Agent. Authorising him to present their petition to the King and 
endeavour in any way to procure the royal grant of their island. 

Copy, f folio page. [For a list of the other papers found within 
the same wrapper see Calef to Dartmouth I February 1775.] 

Settlers on Southern Fox Island to the King. 

1772, November 25. — Petition praying for a grant of this island. 

Original. \\ folio pages. 

Endoised: — Pet 11 Southern Fox Island. 



Board of Trade to the Lords Committee of the Privy Council 

for Plantation Affairs. 

1772, November 30. Whitehall.— Report. Have taken into 
consideration the extract of a letter from Governor Tryon to the Earl 
of Hillsborough, dated 1st of February 1772, and consider that the 
terms of His Majesty's mandamus, in favour of Howard, do not warrant 
the construction put upon it by Tryon and that he ought not to have 
made the grant. The only way for the proprietors to be redressed for 
injuries, is to apply to the Courts of Justice in New York. 

Copy. 3j folio pages. [Draft of this Report is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 63a, fo. 517.] 

Endorsed : — No. 3. Report of the Board of Trade upon an Extract 
of a Letter from W m Tryon Esq r Gov 1 ' of New York, relative to 
a Grant of 10,000 Acres of Land made by him to Lieut. Col. 
Howard. Dated Nov r 30 th 1772. 



[Lord Dartmouth]. Minutes. 

1772, November 30. — Relating to the Mississippi. Mississippi 
Custom House removed from Mobile to Ship Island. Depth of water 
etc. 

In Lord Dartmouth's hand. \ folio page. 



Governor Sir James Wright to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, November. — Memorial. 
Autograph signed. l\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 21. Memorial to the Earl of Dartmouth. Gov r 
Wright, presented Nov r 1772, relative to securing the Province 
of Georgia from the Depredations of the Indians. V. Mem. p. 8. 
Ent d . 



109 
Enclosures : — 



Governor Sir James Wright. 

1772, October 31. — Heads of his memorial sent to Lord Hills- 
borough in November 1771. Concerning Indian trade. Forts 
and lands in Georgia/ 

Autograph. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Heads of my Memorial. In Gov r Wright's 
Memorial of Nov 1772. 1. 

Governor Sir James Wright. 

1772, October 31. — Reasons in support of his memorial sent to 
Lord Hillsborough in November 1771. Observations on the 
advantageous proposal of securing and continuing peace with 
the Indians by the concession of lands. Serious consequences 
that will ensue if some measures are not taken to protect the 
Inhabitants against the Indians. 
Autograph. 3 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Reasons in Support of my Memorial. In Gov r 
Wright's Memorial of Nov r 1772. 2. 

Governor Sir James Wright. 

1772, July 8. Savanah in Georgia. — lt . A General State of 
things as they were in Georgia when I came to the Government 
in October 1760, and how they are now in July 1771." 
Autograph Copy.. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — General State of things in Georgia from 1760 
to 1771. In Govr Wright's Memorial of Nov r 1772. 3. 

Exports of Georgia. 

An Aggregate and Valuation of Exports of Produce from the 
Province of Georgia, with the number of vessels and tonnage 
employed therein, annually distinguished, from the Year 
1754- to 1771. Compiled by William Brown, Comptroller 
and Searcher of his Majesty's Customs in the Port of 
Savannah. 

Printed. 1 strip. 

Endorsed: — In Gov r Wright's Memorial of Nov r 1772. 4. 

Ro^rd of Trade to the Lords Committee of the PRivr Council 

for Plantation Affairs. 

1772, December 3. Whitehall. — Report. [Printed in full in 
Vol. VIII., p. 488, of the "Documents relating to the Colonial History 
of New York," published by that State; also in Force's American 
Archives, Vol. IV., Fourth Series, col. 704. A draft of it, in 
manuscript, is in the Public Record Office, Board of Trade, New York, 
Vol. 63a, fo. 523.] 

Copy . 25 1 folio page <> 

Endorsed: — N° 4. Report if the Lords Comm for Trade & Plan- 
tations, relative to the Disorders that have prevailed in consequence 
of Grants of Land between the Rivers Hudson & Connecticut in 
America. Dated Dec r 3 d 1772. 



110 

Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 3. Boston. 

Autograph letter signed. 3J quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— B 22. M r Joseph W«<ird, Boston, Dec r 3 d 1772. (Praying 
the Office of Secretary to New Hampshire, or any other civil 
Employment in New England; and inclosing the Testimonium of 
M r Abrm Fuller to his Character) with the additional Signature 
of Gov r Hutchinson to M r Fuller's Honor & Veracity. 

Enclosures : — 

Abraham Fuller to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 13. Newton. — Recommending M r Ward as a 
loyal subject and well deserving and Jilted for the post he 
solicits. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — In M r Joseph Ward's of Dec* 3<* 1772. 

Recommendation of Joseph Ward. 

1772, December 13. Newton. — By Abraham Fuller J. P. With 
a certificate by Governor Hutchinson 14 December as to the 
veracity of Fuller's character. 
Original. 2J quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— In Mr Joseph Ward's of Dec** 3 d 1772. 

William Cooper, Town Clerk, to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 8. Boston. — Sends the enclosed by order of the 
committee. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Printed pamphlet containing the Votes and Proceedings of the 
Freeholders and other Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, in 
Town Meeting assembled, according to Law. Published by Order 
of the Town. To which is prefixed, as introductory, an attested 
Copy of a Vote of the Town at a preceding Meeting. 

Containing : — Votes of the Freeholders appointing a Committee 
of 21 persons to state the rights of the Colonists 28 October — 
2 November ; Report of the Committee appointed by the 
town stating the rights of the Colonists, and showing the 
infringements and violations of those rights, 20 November ; 
Letter from Boston to the other towns 20 November ; Ap- 
pendix N° I. Message to the Governor ; N° II. Governor's 
answer 30 October ; No III. Petition of the Town to the 
Governor 30 October ; N° IV. Governor' s answer 2 November. 
Printed pamphlet in stiff covers. 46 quarto pages. 

Major-General Phineas Lyman to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 8. Suffield. — By the increase of population a 
constant emigration is taking place from the settled lands in Connecticut 
to the country between Crown Point and the Connecticut River. 



Ill 

Proposes the erection of a civil government from the Bay of Mexico to 
the Ohio and so to direct that emigration thither. Asks encouragement 
for the Company of Military Adventurers, who served in the provincial 
forces and who propose to settle there. " As to the temper of the 
people they are evidently returning to their old sentiments of loyalty 
and the spirit of Boston don't seem to communicate any heat into the 
country." 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed:— C — 13. Connecticut 8 th Decemb r 1772 Major Gen 
Lyman Proposing Means for the Settlement of the Mississippi 
11/ 15 Febry 1773. 



Marblehead. Proceedings of a Town Meeting. 

1772, December 8. — " Resolved, That every part of the British 
Dominions hath a right to expect that no powers of Legislation or 
Government be exercised, but what are every way consistent with 
the English Constitution, and its true Principles." That the Acts of 
the British Parliament are opposed to the exercise of these rights. 
That a Committee of grievances be chosen etc. etc. 

Copy. 7f folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of the Proceedings at the Town Meeting at 
Marblehead on the 8 th December 1772. 



Lord Dartmouth to Lieutenant General Thomas Gage. 

1772. December 9. Whitehall. — No. 6. Critical state of Indian 
affairs. Troops to remain at Kaskaskias. 

Copy. \\ folio pages. [Draft of this letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 128, fo. 171.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to 
Lieut: Gen 1 Gage, dated Whitehall 9 th Dec r 1772. 



Lord Dartmouth to Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

1772, December 9. Whitehall. — No. 4. Has received his letters of 
1 st October, 23 rd October, and N 03 1 and 2. Remarks on the seditious 
newspapers of Boston and the people's mistaken notions of the 
authority of the British legislature. 

Copy. 5| folio pages. [Draft of this letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 173, fo. 483.] 

Endorsed : — No. 4. Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to 
Gov r Hutchinson, dated Whitehall 9 th Dec r 1772. 



Minutes. 

1772, December 10. — In Lord Dartmouth's hand. "Governor 
Hutchinson concerning the clause to give the Governors custody of 
lunatics and idiots." Governor Franklin on the same subject. £586 
to be allowed to Gov. Browne. 

| folio page. 



112 

The Reverend Mr. Breynton to Captain Hughes. 

1772, December 14. Halifax. — Desertion of troops at Halifax and 
Boston. Considers the King's ships are not half manned, notwith- 
standing the vigilance of the Admiral. The inhabitants induce the 
desertion. "A few pusilauimous Commissioners of the Revenue are 
the sole cause of Boston's being the rendezvous of the shipping." 
The military meet with constant insults at Boston. 

Extract. 1 J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — No. 2. Extract of a Letter from the Rev (1 M r Breynton 
To Cap 11 Hughes, dated Halifax, Nova Scotia, 14 th December 1772. 

Town Meeting at Plymouth. 

1772, December 14. Plimouth Court House. — Proceedings. 
Copy . 5 \ folio p ag es . 

Endorsed : — Copy of the Proceedings and Resolves at the Town 
Meeting at Plymouth on the 14*" December 1772. 

Town Meeting at Roxbury. 

1772, December 14. — Proceedings at a Meeting of Freeholders and 
other Inhabitants taking into consideration a ' State of the Rights of 
the Colonists." 

Copy . 7%fo lio pages. 

Endorsed : — Proceedings of the Freeholders & other Inhabitants of 
the Town of Roxbury legally assembled by adjournment on 
Monday 14 th Dec r 1772. (Copy.) 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 15. London. — Asking him to consider the enclosed 
and render him some assistance. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. With seal (broken). 

Enclosure : — 

Abridgement of part of Governor Grant's deportment against 
the Surveyor General William Gerard de Brahm. 
Autograph. 7 folio pages. 

Captain Elihu Hall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 15. P.S. 20 January. Wallingford. — Relates his 
services in America. Mentions his losses. Desires some lucrative post 
in the Civil department in any of the provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— Capt. Elihu Hall 1773. 

Enclosures : — 

Memorial, to Lord Dartmouth. 

Desiring compensation for money advanced to soldiers, and 
expended upon them in the war for the reduction of Canada. 
Autograph. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — 3Ie mortal of Elihu Hall. 



113 

Enclosures — cont. 

Case of Captaw Hall. 

He raised a Company at his own expense to join the British 
armament under command of General Sinclair for an imme- 
diate reduction of Canada. Had to advance half their pay 
and the whole of their subsistence for which he has received no 
compensation, though he has crossed the Atlantic six times for 
that purpose. 

Printed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Case of Elihu Hall. 

Captain Hall to the Earl op Hillsborough. 

1772, July 31. — u I am sick of this bad World, London and 
Westminster grow Painful to me." Thanks for his kind treat- 
ment. Refers to his petition to Lord North for the Collector- 
ship of Customs in Connecticut. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Elihu Hall July 1772, praying the Collectorship 
of Customs in America. 

Virginia. 

1772, December 19. Council Chamber, Whitehall. — Order of Com- 
mittee of Council. 

Signed. 1 folio page. With seal {paper impressed over a wafer). 

Endorsed : — No. 3. Virginia. Order of the Lords of the Committee 
of Council for plantation affairs, dated Dec r 19, 1772, referring 
to this Board for their consideration & report, an Address of the 
House of Burgesses of Virginia to the King, praying that the 
Gov r of that Colony may be permitted to assent to such Laws as 
may check the importation of Slaves from the Coast of Africa into 
the said Colony. C.c. Rec d Dec r 23, 1772. Read Jaiiry 25 
1773. 

Annexed:- — 

Virginia House of Burgesses. Address to the King. 

[1772, about May 1.] — Desiring him to prevent the importation 
of slaves from Africa into this colony. 
Copy. 2 folio pages. 

The Earl of Dunmore to the Earl of Hillsborough. 

1772, May 1. Williamsburg. — The evil consequences of having so 
many slaves imported to the colony and the desirability of passing 
laws to prevent this. 
Copy . 2 fo Ho pages. 

[The originals of these annexed papers are in the Public 
Record Office, Amer. and W. Indies, Vol. 210, fos. 91 fy 95.] 

B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 21. Kings Bench. — Relates his services to America. 
In 1766 he acted as commissary of Indian affairs and settled the trade 
of the Indian country. His present distress OAving to a lawsuit. Desires 

y 82140. H 



114 

Lord Dartmouth's assistance by granting him a written leave of absence 
from prison to enable him to raise money to procure his liberty. 
Autograph letter signed. 2§ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — C. — 17. M r Roberts, with various Informations respect- 
ing the Savages, &c, in America. 

William Boll an to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 22. Southampton Street, Covent Garden. — Imme- 
diately after his last attendance on Lord Dartmouth he applied to a 
worthy friend, a great dealer in tea, well acquainted with the trade in 
all its capital parts, to draw up his sentiments in writing upon the effect 
of the threepence duty imposed. This friend was also desired by a 
gentleman from the city to make him such a statement to be communi- 
cated to Lord North. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Reasons for a Repeal of the Act of 7th George III. which imposes 
a Duty of three pence per pound weight on Tea imported into 
America. That the levy is contrary to an agreement between 
the Government and the East India Company ; that its removal 
would be beneficial to public revenue as well as to that of the 
Company, and would enable them to dispose of the large 
quantity in their warehouses. They cannot keep up their China 
trade without a freer circulation. 
2\ pages. 

Endorsed: — State of the Tea Trade. 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 22. Boston. — Acknowledges letter N° 2 of the 4 th 
of September. Thanks him for copies of papers concerning the Rhode 
Island affair and complains of the conduct of the people of Boston and 
other towns. 

Copy. 1| pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 174, fo. 23.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Gov r Hutchinson to the Earl 
of Dartmouth dated Boston 22 d December 1772. 

Lord Suffolk to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 23. 50 minutes past o p.m. Duke S* Westminster. 
— Lord North believed Lord Dartmouth would approve of the resolution 
of last night's meeting so had his name inserted among the Lords 
present. If not agreeable it can be erased. 

Not autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Suffolk 23 Dec r 1772. Enclosing Minute of the 



Cabinet. 



» 



The Reverend Thomas Atkin to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1772, December 26. Queen Ann's County. — The bearer, Captain 
Thomas, will be glad to receive commands. 

Fragment of autograph signed letter. £ quarto page. 



115 

John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 26. Bath. — His zeal for the public service. Hopes 
soon to be well enough to return to his duties. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— W Pownall, Bath, 26 Dec r 1772. 



Town Meeting at Pembroke. 

1772, December 28. — Proceedings of a Town meeting, with copy ot 
a letter from it to the Committee of Correspondence at Boston 31 
December 1772. Complaint of grievances. Desire for redress. 

Copy . 4£ folio pages . 

Endorsed: — No. 5. Copy of Proceedings of a Town Meeting at 
Pembroke Dec r 28 th 1772. 



The Reverend Dr. Eleazar Wheelock to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 28. Hanover, New Hampshire. — Congratulations 
on his appointment as Secretary of State. Good wishes. Submits 
the enclosed petitions to his Lordship's disposal. " I am very sorry to 
hear that the Character, and Administrations of My dear Governor 
Wentworth are impeach'd before the Board of Trade. And indeed 
it is strange to me, if there be any Reason for, or Justice in the Charges 
laid against him, that I have been so long in this Province, and have 
had so much acquaintance with him (and as I supposed with all 
orders and sorts of men in it) and have never once, that I remember, 
heard him complaind of in any one particular which I hear he is now 
complaind of and charged with before that Honourable Board. And 
your Lordship will pardon me that my Zeal is so far warmed for his 
vindication against that which I suppose to be cruel slander, as to say, 
and it is but what I must say if I were under the greatest solemnity, 
that his true character (so far as I know it) is that he is easie of Access, 
his Temper benevolent and obliging, he is a Pattern of Charity and 
Compassion to the poor and afflicted, He is vigilant, and Assiduous, to 
promote, and incourage Virtue, Learning, Industry, impartial Justice, 
Peace, and good Order throughout his Province, and the happy Effects 
of his mild, and prudent Administrations witness the same. And I 
verily beleive their is not a Governor upon this Continent more cordially 
and universally beloved by his People than Governor Wentworth, nor 
one they would be willing to exchange him for." 

Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed .— -Rev (l D r Wheelock Dec r 28 1 772. 

Enclosures : — 

The Reverend Dr. Wheelock to the King. 

1772, December 28. Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire. — " The Petition of Eleazar Wheelock Doctor in Divinity 
and President of Dartmouth College on Connecticut River in 
the Province of New Hampshire, Most Humbly Sheweth, — That 
the Petitioner Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subject, 
did upon his own Inheritance and at his own Ecv pence found and 
erect an Indian charity School, in Your Majesty's Colony of 
Connecticut above twenty years ago, with a, view to civilize and 

h 2 



116 

Enclosures — cont. 

christianize the Natives in the Wilds of America, and by the 
Charitable Donations of Friends piously disposed towards the 
Design of said School, and particularly by Your Majesty's 
most benevolent Assistance in the Year 1766, and the charitable 
Donations of many Noblemen, Gentlemen and Others in 
imitation of Your Majesty's pious Example, which your 
Petitioner dos always most gratefully Acknowlege, he has been 
enabled to support and continue said School unto this Day. 
That by Your Majesty's Royal Munificence said School was 
constituted a College by Letters Patent under the great Seal of 
the Province of New Hampshire bearing Date the eighteenth 
Day of December in the year of our Lord one Thousand, seven 
Hundred and sixty -nine by the Name of Dartmouth College, 
and there upon was soon removed and Settled in this new and 
almost uncultivated Wilderness, ivith a Special View to civilize 
3? Christianize the indian Natives, as well as encourage and 
promote the Settlement of this new Sf wide extended Country, 
whereby a large Addition of Subjects and oppulcnce may accrue 
to your Majesty's American Do?ninions. 
That it has been found by repeated Tryals, Sf long Experience 
that it is necessary in order to the Successful Prosecution of the 
great Design propiosed, that a Suitable Number of English 
Youths should be fitted for Missionaries to go forth with the 
Children of the Natives to take the Lead and conduct of the 
great affair in the Wilderness. 
That a Number Educated in this School ha ve been and still are 
employed as Missionaries with Success in that Service, and a 
considerable Number arc now preparing in this College and 
School to follow after them in a Succession as God in his 
Providence shall open a Door for their Employment therein. 
That the Hardships and Dangers they have to encounter in such 
a Service, while separated so far from all the pleasurable 
Enjoyments of the Social Life., and among uncultivated Savages 
in the Wilderness, are too many and great to enumerate or 
justly describe. 
That one great and common Objection, among many others which 
their own thoughts as well as their Friends naturally and 
strongly suggest against their undertaking such a Mission, is 
that they must either undergo the Mortification and all the 
Burdens Sf Disadvantages of a Single and umnarried Life 
in that Service, or bring up a Family without the ordinary 
Advantages of an Education and be exposed to leave a Widow 
and Children under very penurious and dependant Circum- 
stances. 
That the Slender Funds already collected for the Support of 
Missionaries in this said Service, bear but small proportion to 
their great Expences, or the Demerit of Such a Service. The 
Confederation of which has induced Your Humble Petitioner,, 
though at great Expeuce, to examine into the State and 
Situation of Your Majesty's vacant and uncultivated Lands in 
this Country, by which he has discovered Sundry large Tracts 
of Land in the Province of New York wholly uncultivated, Sf 
never yet granted by any of your Majesty's Governors in 
America, and neither claimed nor possessed by the Indians. 
That your Humble Petitioner is very desirous of obtaining your 



117 

Enclosures — cont. 

Majesty's Letters Patent under the great seal of the Province 

of New York for the Quantity of Twenty-five Thousand Acres 

of the said vacant Lands, in Trust for the use of said 

Missionaries and their needy Families on the same Terms of 

Quit Rent which your Majesty has lately been pleased to grant 

(as your Petitioner is informed) in Trust to the Governors of 

your Majesty's College in the Province of New York and to the 

Church of England in the same Province by Laio Established. 

Your Petitioner therefore most humbly pro yes that Your 

Majesty would be graciously pleased to take the Premises 

into your princely Consideration and to grant unto the 

Trustees of said Dartmouth College your Majesty's royal 

Order or Mandamus, to the Governor or Commander in 

Chief of your Majesty's Province of New York directing 

and commanding him by your Majesty's Letters Patent 

under the great Seal of the said Province to grant unto 

your Petitioner or to the Trustees of said Dartmouth 

College, in Trust, fat* the use of such Missionaries as shall 

be Jrom Time to Time sent forth into said Service, or for 

the Education of their Children, or Support of their needy 

ividows and Families, at Discretion as Merit or necessity 

shall deserve and require, the said Quantity of Tuenty- 

five Thousand Acres of Land on the same Terms of Quit 

Rent as above Specified, and that the same may be erected 

into a Township by the Name of Appii Forum and vested 

with all the usual Privileges granted to other Townships 

with in the Said Province, and your Petitioner as in Duty 

bound shall pray Sf-c." 

Autograph signed. 2% folio pages. 

The Eeverend Dr. Wheelock to the King. 

1772, December 28. Same address. — " That the Petitioner your 
Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subject, being deeply 
impressed with a just sense of your Majesty's most gracious and 
benevolent Aid and Assistance extended in the Year one thousand 
seven hundred and sixty-six, to the Indian Charity* School 
founded more than twenty Years ago, and carried on in your 
Majesty's Colony of Connecticut by your Majesty's humble 
Petitioner, which has since been removed to the Province of 
New Hampshire, and thro' your Majesty's Royal Munificence 
constituted a College by Letters Patent under the great Seal of 
the said Province bearing date the eighteenth day of December 
in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty 
nine by the name of Dartmouth College, for uhich peculiar 
privileges your Petitioner begs leave with undissembled Sincerity 
to return your Majesty his most unfeigned and hearty 
thanks. 

That your Petitioner flatters himself that the erection of the said 
College has already been, and will yet be of great utility and 
Ad antage to this as yet almost wild and uncultivated part of 
your Majesty's American Dominions, by encouraging Population 
and Literature, and promoting civility and Virtue, particularly 
among the Indians. 

That the slender Funds on which this Infant Seminary is 
established has induced your Majesty's Petitioner (tho* at great 



118 

Enclosures — cont. 

expence) to examine into the State and Situation of your 

Majesty's vacant and uncultivated Lands in this Country, by 

which he has discovered sundry large tracts of Lands in the 

Province of New York wholly uncultivated and never yet 

granted by any of your Majesty' 's Governors in America, and 

neither claimed nor possessed by the Indians. 

That your Petitioner is very desirous of obtaining your Majesty f s 

Letters Patent under the great Seal of the Province of New 

York for the quantity of twenty jive thousand Acres of the said 

vacant Lands to your Petitioner and his Successors, or to the 

Trusteis of said College in Trust, for the same Uses and 

purposes of said College and School as the Lands already given 

by private Doners were designed for, and on the same Terms of 

Quit Rent which your Majesty has been lately pleased to grant 

(as your Petitioner is informed) in Trust to the Governors of 

Your Majesty 's College in the Province of New York, and to 

the Church of England in the same Province as by haw 

established. 

Your Petitioner therefore most humbly prays, that your 
Majesty would be graciously pleased to take the Premises 
into your princely Consideration, and to grant to your 
Petitioner, or to the Trustees of said Dartmouth College 
your Majesty'' s Royal Order or Mandamus to the Governor 
or Commander in Chief of your Majesty 's Province of 
New York, directing and commanding him by your 
Majesty s Letters Patent under the great Seal of the said 
Province to grant unto your Petitioner and his Successors, 
or to the Trustees of said College in Trust, for the early 
Use an I Rene fit of said College a*ul School as before 
specified, the said quantity of twenty -five thousand Acres of 
Laud on the same Terms of Quit Rent as above specified, 
and that the same may be erected into a Township, by the 
name of St. George, and vested with the usual Privileges 
granted to other Townships within the said Province" 
Signed. 3 J quarto pages. 



Dartmouth College. 

1773, January 1. — Address to herd Dartmouth from twenty- 
eight Scholars of different standing in the College and School, 
intending missionaries. Expressing their deep sense of his 
lordship's goodness to them and offering their congratulations 
on his promotion . Affairs of the seminary wear an encouraging 
aspect " whether we consider the endearing generosity of our 
excellent Governor in particular or the good affection the 
leading part of the Province manifest towards it or the 
unwearied assiduity of cur worthy President." 
L,etter signed. 3 pages. 



Dartmouth College. 

Specimen of two Indian boys' writing after five week* instruction. 
" Courtesy and humility denote gentility." 
1 slip. 



119 

[South Carolina.] 

i frwi S£miS^n -"^ > ff ort of the Committee on the Public Treasurer's 
Accounts between these dates. 
4 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — (Paper No. I.) 

[N.B. — For paper endorsed N° 2, 3, and 4 see under Thurlow and 
Wedderburn 31 March 1772, which paper is in the same hand- 
writing as this.] 

Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772, December 31. New York. — Remarks on lands in East Florida 
Virginia, &c. Desires an appointment in East Florida. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Woolridge concerning Lands in America. 

Edward Abbott to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [1772]. — " My Lord. In obedience to your Lordships com- 
mands I have Collected from some Papers I have with me the best 
Accounts they and my memory furnishes of the State of Detroit." The 
inhabitants are loyal and brave ; they have often expressed a wish for 
a civil government. The Indians there could be easily governed by a 
proper person. The imports from British manufactures amount to 
£100,000 and from the West Indies to nearly as much. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Abbott. Account of Detroit. 



Joseph Adams, mate of sloop " Liberty," to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [ 1 772]. — Petition. Recounts his distresses since the destruction 
of the " Liberty" at Newport 19 July 1769, having had to flee to 
Connecticut, West Indies, New York, Philadelphia, and Barbadoes; thence 
by the kindness of Captain Thomas Adams was brought to London, 
where he presented a memorial to the Lords of the Treasury. John 
Robinson at this time charged the petitioner falsely, on which he 
returned to Boston and obtained two affidavits and other papers clearing 
his character, came back to London and now seeks relief. 

Original. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Jo. Adams. Petition To the R fc Honb le the Earl of 
Dartmouth his Majestys Chief Sec? of State for N. America. 

Trade and Revenue of North America. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Observations on the Trade and Revenue of North 
America, with some Hints for the Improvement of both, and a Plan for 
the Prevention of Smuggling. Begins. — '* North America having been 
fully explored in the Course of the last War, a more thorough Knowledge 
was obtained of its real State and Circumstances." 

54 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 11. Observations on the Trade and Revenue of 
North America, &c, and A Plan for the Prevention of Smuggling. 



120 

Major-General John Bradstreet to the King, 

N. D. [? 1772].— -Petition. Written by T. Howard his agent. Ex- 
pense to which he has been put, for cultivating certain lands in Albany 
County New York. Desires he may hold said land exempt from all 
quit-rents and provincial fees, in consideration of the money he has laid 
out, and for his services in America during the late war. 

Original. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — The Petition of Maj r Gen 1 John Bradstreet. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1772]. — Observations on the annexed sheets, which com- 
prehend a full history of Florida. 

Not autograph. 2 large folio pages, in stiff cover. 

Annexed : — 

1772. History of East Florida from its discovery in 1513 to 
1771. In three chapters and with tables of Surveys. Gives 
details of its discovery, conquest, settlement by the Spaniards, 
cession to England, and first inhabitants, a description of the 
country, the boundaries, and surveys. 

The separate title page to the Tables of Surveys alone is in 
De Brahm 's hand. 
64 large folio pages. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1772]. — Memorial. Asks that his papers and maps may be 
laid before the Board of Trade and the usual certificate for his salary 
due since last midsummer 1772. 

Autograph signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — The Memorial of William Gerard de Brahm. 



William Gerard de Brahm to the Lords Commissioners 

of the Treasury. 

N. D. [1772]. — Memorial. Relates his services in establishing in 
1751 the colony of Bethany in Georgia with 300 Germans with the 
approval of the several Governors. Complains of Governor Grant's 
treatment of him in St. Augustine. Sends particulars of the same. 
[ Qy. That this is the Memorial referred to in his letter to Lord 
Dartmouth, 23 January 1773.] 

Signed. 1 ^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Southern District of North America. Surveyor General's 
Memorial And Governor Grant's Deportment, 

Annexed : — 

Abridgement of Governor Grants Deportment against the Surveyor 
General. With a letter from John Stokes to De Brahm, 21 
December 1772. 

Copy. 14 large pages. [See above under 15 December.] 



121 

Minutes. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Paper in John PownalPs hand, endorsed " Cabinet " 
and headed " Memorandum of business upon which The King's Pleasure 
is to be taken." " For taking the sense of Cabinet upon General 
Gage's request to have orders for withdrawing from the Illinois the 
Detatchment of 50 men stationed at the Kaskaskias." Other items refer 
to Lieutenant Governor Cramahe, Governor Shuldham, and Lord 
Dunmore's letter respecting the running of the boundary line between 
Virginia and the Indian country. Governor Leyborne. Memorial of 
Merchants trading to Africa. Governor Chester. Lieutenant Governor 
of Antigua. Appointment of Horsmanden to be Chief Justice of New 
York. M r Duke Solicitor General at Barbadoes. 

3 folio pages. 



Lieutenant- Colonel Gabriel Christie to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [? 1772].— Memorial. 
\page. 

Endorsed: — N° 12. Memorial of Lieut.-Col. Christie, praying, that 
some Lands which were formerly in the Possession of the French 
as a part of Canada, and which he purchased of the French pro- 
prietors, may not (tho' included in New York by the Proclamation 
of 1763) be granted away from him. 

Annexed: — 

Petition to the King. 

No signatures. Said by Lieut.-Col. Christie to be from the 
original proprietors and others who purchased from them. 

Land purchased by them on Lake Champlain in consequence of 
the session of Canada to the King, made by His most Christian 
Majesty. By an alteration in the boundary line their property 
comes within the jurisdiction of New York, they are under 
apprehensions of being deprived of it, as some of them have been 
already by grants made during the government of the late Sir 
Hy. Moore. Desire the King to examine into the just cause of 
their complaint, recall those grants and prevent the tike occurring 
again. 
2 1 pages. 

Endorsed: — In Lieut. Col. Christie's Memorial to the Earl 
of Dartmouth. 



New York and New Hampshire Disputed Grants. 

N. D. [1772]. — State of Facts relative to the Lands West of the 
Connecticut River. Owing to the uncertainty of the boundary between 
New York and New Hampshire, the Governors of both these provinces 
made grants in disputed lands between the Connecticut and Hudson 
Rivers. An order was issued on 24 July 1767 that the Governor of 
New York should not make any grants within the limits of any town- 
ships laid out by the Governor of New Hants. In June 1771 the 
Board of Trade considered this subject and reported their opinion to 
the Lords of the Council but no determination has been made thereon 



122 

as yet, though Governor Tryon has granted several townships of 
late. 

Copy. 8 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 3. State of Facts relative to Lands West of Con- 
necticut River. 



The Reverend Temple Henry Croker to Lord Dartmouth. 

1772. — Memorial. Has been invited by several influential gentlemen 
to go and settle with them on the Mississippi. Is willing to go, 
but waits Lord Dartmouth's appointment to a place or living within 
the said settlement, and with such provision for support as may be 
thought proper. 

Signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — To the Right Honourable The Earl of Dartmouth The 
Memorial of The Rev d Temple Henry Choker, Clke. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to the Lord President of the Council. 

N. D. [? 1772]. Whitehall. — In accordance with the King's 
command has directed Pownall to deliver to the clerk of the Council 
in waiting all papers relative to the complaint against the Governor <%f 
New Hampshire with representation of the Board of Trade to His 
Majesty thereon. 

Rough draft in PownalVs hand. 1 quarto page. 



Trade of Dunkirk. 

1772. — Estimate of the Annual Imports at Dunkirk from Great 
Britain and Ireland with the Principal articles of Fair Trade, exported 
from Dunkirk to London, with remarks. America is mentioned several 
times. By Captain Frazer. 

\\\ folio pages. 

Memorial of the Inhabitants of East Florida. 

N. D. [? about 1772]. — To whom is not stated. On Governor Grant's 
promise to the inhabitants of enjoyment of their privileges. Outrage 
of Creek Indians. Showing how money given by Parliament f..r the 
improvement of the colony has been wasted. Mention of .losiah Bagly 
whose lands, on his death, were seized by the (Governor. Their griev- 
ances against Governor Grant are so numerous that th^y pray tor an 
Assembly like other provinces, for the purpose of making such laws as 
the exigency of their circumstances require. 

J^ot signed. 1 large leaf both sides. 



Captain John Gordon, Jacob Vanbraam, and others, to 

the King. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Memorial. Difficulties in procuring grants of land 
in North America on account of their inability to apply for them 
personally. Desire the King will grant a mandamus that such officers 
of the navy and army as served in North America during the late 



123 

war may be allowed their shares of lands in North America upon 
application to the Governors and Councils of the Provinces by power 
of attorney. 
2 pages. 

Endorsed : — To the King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council the 
Humble Memorial of John Gordon &c. 



Case of Captain John Graeme. 

N. D. [1772]. — Kepresenting that his brother the late Lieutenant- 
Colonel Gra3me about the year 1768 gave a power of attorney to a 
friend to enter into negotiations for 5,000 acres of land in New York. 
Requests that Lord Dartmouth would procure a new mandamus for him 
or the heirs at law. 

I page. 

Endorsed : — Case of Cap 1 John Grasme of Duchrie rec d from Col. 
Murray. 

The same, but with some variations in the opening sentence. 
1J pages. 

Endorsed : — Case of Cap* John Graham of Duchrie. 



Captain Elihu Hall to Lord North. 

N. D. [1772]. — Memorial. Certified by several London merchants. 
Beginning " That your Memorialist raised a Company for an intended 
Expedition against Canada " (qy. see a similar memorial in the 
previous list of Lord Dartmouth's MSS., Eleventh Report, App x V., 
p. 372.) 

Signatures of the merchants are autograph. 2 large pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 9. Memorial of Elihu Hall to Lord North, praying 
the Appointment of Collector of Customs in Connecticut, or other 
Provision, in requital for his Losses and Services. 



Monsieur Hocquart. 

N. D. [? 1772].— Claim to the Port of Gros Mekatinat on the Coast 
of La Bras-dor. 
b\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Mon r Hocquart's Claim to the Gros macatinat. 

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Howard. 

N. D. [1772].— State of Title to the 10,000 Acres on Connecticut 
River in the County of Cumberland. " This Title is founded on a 
peremtory Mandamus from the King, recommended by the Board of 
Trade, and Advised by the Privy Council." 

8^ folio pages. [A duplicate of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 173, fo. 423.] 

Endorsed : — State of Colonel Howard's Title to Lands on Connecticut 
River in the County of Cumberland. 



124 



JEnclosures : — 



1772. February 3. Boston. — Copy of Governor Hutchinson's lettei 
to Governor William Try on. 

Certified by William Try on. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Gov r Hutchinson to 
Gov r Tryon, dated Boston, Z d Feb r v 1772 (relative to 
Col. Howard's Grant at Hinsdale, and his Controversy 
with the other Claimants of that Township). In State of 
Col. Howard's Title to Lands on Connecticut River. 

Narrative of Lieutenant Colonel Howard' s Application to Governor 
Try on for a Grant of Land in New York. Upon Lieutenant 
Colonel Howard's arrival at New York, he made application 
to Governor Tryon to have his Majesty's Order of Council for 
ten thousand Acres of Land located near a settled country. 
Not finding such, he employed a private surveyor who reported 
a vacant tract near Connecticut River and letters patent were 
ordered by Gov. Tryon to invest him with that property. 
If pages. 

Endorsed : — Narrative of Col. Howard's Application to 
Gov r Tryon for a Grant of T^and in New York. (In State 
of Col. Howard's Title to Lands on Connecticut River.) 

[These three papers were probably enclosed by Governor Tryon to 
Xord Dartmouth in his letter of 5 January 1773.] 



Description of the Illinois. 

N. D. [1772]. — Its position — in the 40 th degree of latitude, 500 leagues 
from New Orleans by water and 350 by land—its natural features, the 
people, the forts and the best way to deal with the Indians there. 

2f pages. 

Endorsed: — Description of The Illinois. 



Nathaniel Jones of the Middle Temple, Barrister at Law, 
to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [? '772]. — Memorial. Being constituted by sign manual Chief 
Justice of the Jerseys in North America in .June 1759, he relinquished 
his business. Objection and persecution shown towards him there and 
refusal of the Assembly to support him. By his long absence he has 
lost his business and having been at much expense is now in reduced 
circumstances. 

Original. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — To the Right Honourable the Earl of Dartmouth one of 
his Majesty's principal Secretary's of State,— The Memorial of 
Nath 1 Jones Esq r Barrister at Law. 

Note. — For letters and papers relative to the opposition to Mr. Jones and the 
prior claim put forth by Robert Hunter Morris to the chief- , justiceship of the same 
province, see the New Jersey Archives, Vol. IX., Newark, ;N. J v 1885. 



125 

[William Knox to Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [? about 1772]. — Note in the hand of William Knox to the 
effect that M r Arnaut would not trust him with any part of the Keport. 
That there is nothing in it worth his Lordship's perusal as it is merely 
an abridgement of the case lately laid before the Attorney and Solicitor 
General and of the State in 1768 and a narrative of what passed 
respecting the association for non-importation, the quartering the four 
Companies of the Artillery that put in to Boston and the proceedings 
respecting the Judges' Salaries. 

1 quarto pay c. 

Fees of Civil Officers. 

N. D. [? about 1772]. — Case of the Civil Officers claiming fees in the 
Colonies. " In the Colonies of Quebec, Nova Scotia, New York, Georgia, 
East and West Florida, The Fees to be taken by the Civil Officers are 
established by Ordinance or Order of the Governor and Council." In 
other colonies the fees are in general settled by Act of General 
Assembly. Questions as to the King's legal power to revoke, annul, 
or even alter many of these fees. 

In the hand of William Knox. 7 pages. 

Endorsed: — Dra* of Case of the Civil Officers claiming Fees in the 



Colonies. 



Claim of the Sieur Lotbiniere. 



N. D. [1772]. — A number of papers in French with reference to the 
claim of the Sieur Michel Chartier de Lotbiniere to lands on Lake 
Champlain — apparently memoranda for the Earl of Dartmouth. 

These papers are : — 

'* Memorandum pour deux seigneuries a la tete du lac Champlain 
propriete du S r Michel Chartier de Lotbiniere " &c. 

" Prospectus sur mes deux seigneuries du lac Champlain el 
des somrnes depensees a leur occasion." Londres 23 Juin 
1772. 

" Ext : de la capitulation generale du Canada 8 Sep. 1760 con- 
cernant les proprietes et droits de tous ceux qui vivent dans 
l'Etendu du d*. pais " with 

« Ext : du traite de paix " 10 Fev. 1763. 

il Reflexions sur la valeur de mes deux Seigneuries du lac Cham- 
plain " Londres 9 Dec. 1772. 

• Extract from his journal concerning a conversation held with 
Lord Hillsborough 24 March 1772. 

Original. 13 quarto pages. [Somewhat similar papers are in the 
Public Record Office, Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 42.] 

Mississippi Settlement. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Reasons for Establishing the intended Government 
on the Mississippi at the White Cliffs near Point Coupe. Signed by 
Merchants, American Officers, and Intentional Settlers and addressed 
to Lord Dartmouth. Upwards of 4,000 persons from different parts of 
America and Europe are settled on lands between the Natchez an<? 



126 

Lake Maura pa. [importance of forming a seat of Government on the 
Mississippi. Six reasons Avhy the tract of land called the White Cliffs, 
now in Montfort Browne's possession is the best spot for such an 
establishment. Governor Browne has offered a large tract of land 
adjoining these cliffs for building purposes. 
Original signed. 2 large pages. 

Endorsed : — Reasons For Establishing the intended Government on 
the Mississippi at the White Cliffs near Point Coupe. Humbly 
offered to the Consideration of the Right Honourable The Earl 
of Dartmouth. 

Copy of the foregoing. ; 

1| large pages. 

N. ~D. [? 1772]. — Further Reasons for the immediate Establishment 
of a Government on the Mississippi in the Province of West Florida, 
humbly submitted to the consideration of the Right Honourable the 
Earl of Dartmouth. Commercial advantages that will accrue to Britain 
and the West Indies from this establishment. 

1 large page. 

Natchez. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Thoughts on erecting a New Government at the 
Natchez. " The Memorial of Lord Eglinton, Colonels Taylor and 
Brown, Recommending the erecting a New Government at Natchez 
on the Mississippi certainly deserves the most serious consideration." 

5 pages and a line and a half . 

Endorsed: — C — 28. Thoughts on erecting a New Gov* at the 
Natchez on the Mississippi. 

Claim of Mr. Remson. 

N. D. [? 1772]. — Paper containing opinion on M r Remson's claim of 
lands in New York. The writer submits that as M r Remson and others 
disclaimed their title to lands illegally purchased from the Indians, the 
remaining part not yet granted away by the Crown might be allowed 
them in payment of the quit rent. 

\\ pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 9. Mr Remson's Claim of Lands in N. York. 

Captain Sinclair, late of the 15 th regiment, to Lord 

Dartmouth. 

r^N. D. [? about 1772]. — Petition. That he served during the last 
war in North America. That he was employed for three years thereafter 
in exploring the lakes and rivers on that continent. That he erected a 
small post for the security of the vessels then under the management of 
the Crown, for which no adequate allowance has yet been made to him. 
An Indian deed and papers relative thereto are lodged in M r Pownall's 
hands. Prays for a sufficient title to the lands granted in the Indian 
deed and to the barracks built thereon. 
1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Memorial of Cap. Sinclair. 



127 

Governor Wentworth and Peter Livius. 

[Winter of 1772-3.] — Extract of the answer of Governor John 
Wentworth to the complaint exhibited against him by Peter Livius. 
[A copy of this complaint in the Public Record Office is dated 
18 December 1772 ] With this answer is placed the reply of Peter 
Livius, including evidence containing extracts from the Minutes of 
Council from 1768 to 1772, and depositions of George Wentworth, Samuel 
Livermore and Thomas Palmer, the last dated 10 March 1773. 



John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouih]. 

1773, January 4. Bath. — Hopes to return to his duty in a week or 
ten days. Has received from M r Pollock a copy of the last despatch 
from Carolina, upon which he will only say that he most zealously 
wishes that without prejudice to any other person, some occasion may 
soon present itself of removing Lord Charles to a better situation and 
thereby avoid to himself and to Government the unpleasant conse- 
quences of a dispute which whilst it is maintained on one side upon 
the ground of privilege and on the other side upon the ground of 
prerogative can never have an end. Observations as to the legality of 
General Haldimand exercising the powers of commander-in-chief in 
North America. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall. Bath, 4 Jan r y 1773. 

John Thornton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 4. Clapham. — D" Furneaux, the dissenting minister, 
called on him and showed him an advertisement which appeared in the 
Virginia Gazette signed by five ministers detained in prison for 
preaching outside their meeting houses. "He was somewhat earnest 
with me to lay the case before your Lordship, which I was the less 
fond of doing as I apprehended he wanted to recommend himself in 
order to solicit more powerfully for the Dissenters Bill to be brought 
in by Sir H. Hoghton." 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— J . Thornton Esq r 4 Jan? 1773. 

Thomas Wooldridge to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 4. New York. — Relates information he has gained 
respecting the apprehensions of the judicious of this country as to what 
may be the result of the execution of a commission to examine into the 
affair of the " Gaspee " schooner. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Woolridge concerns American Troubles. 



Edward Elm sale to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 5. Thornhill. — The latter part of the letter refers to 
one John Sykes who is very desirous of going to America. 
'Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken), lj quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Elmsall, 5 Jan? 1773. 



128 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 5. Fort George. New York. — Acknowledges the 
King's approbation of his endeavours to become acquainted with the 
state of the different parts of the Colony. With reference to 
the purchases and grants made at the Congress in July previous, states 
that in full confidence of the quiet enjoyment of these lands a number 
of subjects have expended nearly 5,000/. in surveys and purchases. 
Submits whether it would not be a real hardship if titles thus regularly 
obtained should suffer any impeachment. Concerning the Canadian 
claims, states the facts on which he grounded the opinion he had 
presumed to give; — that the Dutch, the first settlers, claimed the whole 
of the Connecticut River and Lake Champlain and all the country 
South of the St. Lawrence down to the Delaware River — that a West 
line from the head of the Connecticut has always been deemed the 
ancient boundary of New York. Two instances in which it has been 
abridged. Considers the question of the extent of the French dominions 
as interfering with these bounds. Encroachments of the Canadians. 
Regrets the failure of his expedient to settle the New Hampshire 
claimants. With regard to Colonel Howard's grant, it was issued in 
obedience to His Majesty's mandamus, and it was not until afterwards 
he was informed that some settlers on this grant pretended a claim 
under Massachusetts Bay. Sends a copy of the case and of his corre- 
spondence with Governor Hutchinson on the subject. 

Copy. 12 j pages. [The original signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 183, fo. 79, 
and a duplicate in Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 43, fo. 5.] 

Endorsed: — N° 5. Copy of a Letter from Gov r Tryon to the Earl 
of Dartmouth, dated New York, 5 Jan r y 1773. Relative to the 
New York Claim of Lands near Lake Champlain, and to Col. 
Howard's Grant at Hinsdale. 

Joseph Cawthorne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 6. At M rs Hix's, Vine Street, Piccadilly. — On the 
lecessity of preventing the jail distemper being carried in infected 
ransports to America. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Cawthorne with Some Essays ou the Jail Dis- 
temper. 

Daniel Coxe to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, January 6. Trenton, New Jersey. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 J pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 3. M r Daniel Coxe, Trenton, New Jersey, 
Jan r y 6 th 1773 (relative to a Claim of Land on the Mississippi, for 
which he requests a more adequate Compensation (but in any 
shape) than he has hitherto received). 

Enclosure : — 

Board of Trade to the King. 

1699, December 21. Whitehall. — Representation. A note on th% 
back is as follows : " About this .Period (1699) D r Coxe sent 
two Ships on Discovery and Settlement, one of which entered 



129 

Enclosure — cont . 

the River Mississippi, and went up as far as where New Orleans 
now stands, {being the first English Ship that ever did it), but 
were drove off by a Party of French, superior in numbers, and 
obliged to give over the Enterprize fy further Attempts of 
Settlement, nor have the Family ever been able since to make 
any, for want of the Aid of the Crown to support them against 
the Possession of the French Hill the late Peace, when the 
present Heir of D r Coxe made an application, tho* unsuccessfull, 
for a Regrant, or an adequate Recompence for his Surrender 
Sf Releaser 

1J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Inclosed in M r Coxe's Letter of 6 th Jan^v 1773. 

Joseph Ward to Lord Partmouth. 

1773, January 6. Boston, Massachusetts Bay, New England. — 
Satisfaction of the Americans at his Lordship's elevation. — A plan 
is being formed to render America entirely independent of Great 
Britain. They are appointing standing committees in the towns to 
keep up a correspondence with all the colonies. They have also a 
system of civil government drawn up, ready to publish, similar to that 
of the United Provinces of Holland. For the security of the seaports 
their idea is to offer free trade to all nations. Desires his Lordship to 
procure him a commission as Secretary of New Hampshire. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— Jo. Ward, Boston N. E. Jan? 6, 1773. B. 22. 

Samuel Cutts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 9. Portsmouth (Province of New Hampshire in 
New England). — General satisfaction of the Americans on his lord- 
ship's appointment as Secretary of State. Desires compensation for a 
loss of land in the island of Miquelon, sustained on the establishment 
of the peace with France. Hopes Joseph Ward may succeed in his 
application for a civil office in this province. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — B — 33. S. Cutts, Portsmouth N. Hamps. Jan^ 9, 1773. 

South Carolina, Clerk of the Assembly, to Mr. Garth. 

1773, January 12. — Uneasiness caused by the postponement of the 
passing of the Tax bill. Lord Charles [Montagu] sails for England 
in a month. 

Extract. J page. 

Endorsed: — N° 3. Extract of a Letter from S. Carolina to 
S. Garth Esq r 12 Jan. 1773. [Qy. that the initial here is a 
mistake. Charles Garth was agent for So. Carolina.] 

[ ] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 12. — Paper not signed, addressed to the "Earl of 
Dartmouth, Blackheath, Kent." Considers it great impolicy to 
nominate either Scotch or Irishmen for governors or other employment 
in America owing to the prejudice of the Americans against them. 

y 82140. * 



130 

English noblemen or gentlemen will be the most agreeably received. 
All secretaries &c. should be enjoined to reside in their respective 
provinces. Necessity for good roads, upon the making of which 
transported felons and deserting soldiers might be employed. 
4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Anonymous 1772. 

The Duke of Argyll to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 13. Argyll House. — Hearing that Lord Greville 
Montagu is not to continue in his government, asks that his brother, 
now Governor of Nova Scotia, may be transferred thither. His health 
has suffered from the climate and he was in danger of losing his eye- 
sight from the effects of the continued snow. A copy of the answer, 
not dated, in Lord Dartmouth's own hand, is on the reverse. 

Autograph letter signed. \^ quarto pages. Answer 1 page. 

Endorsed: — A 41, Duke of Argyle 13 th Jan^ 1773, desiring the 
Removal of his Brother L d W m Campbell to So. Carolina. 

Mrs. Deborah Chetwynd to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 14. St. James's Palace.— In 1767 a grant of 30,000 
acres of land in North America was made to her in the name of her 
agent Charles de Friedenberg. Desires a new mandamus may be now 
made out in her own name. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M rs Chetwynd. Grant of 30,000 Acres N. York. 

Annexed : — 

Board op Trade to the Lords Committee of the Privy 

Council. 

1768, November 17. Whitehall. — Report. Propose that the 
King be recommended to instruct the Governor of New York to 
grant 30,000 acres of land to Charles de Friedenberg free from 
the payment of quit rents for the first ten years. 

Copy. 2\ pages. \_A Draft of this is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 63a, fo. 271.] 

Charles Freidenberg to the Board of Trade. 

1768, November 3. London. — Memorial. Desires the dispatch 
of the mandamus for 30,000 acres of land granted him on the 
west side of Lake Champlain at the river Savannah [Saranac~], 
1 \ pages. \The original of this is in the Public Record 
Office, Board of Trade, New York, Vol. 39, fo. 253.] 

Charles de Friedenburg (or Freidenburg) to the King. 

Memorial. Desires a grant of 30,000 acres of land in New 
York. 

% page. \_A duplicate of this, annexed to an Order in Council 
of 24 August 1767, is in the Public Record Office, same volume 
as the preceding enclosure, fo. 39.] 



131 

William Story to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 15. Ipswich, New England. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 1 pages. 

Endorsed .— B— 7 '. M r W ra Story N. England Jan r y 15 1773 re- 
questing an Appointm* in the Customs in Mass. Bay. 

Granville Sharp to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 16. Old Jewry. — The last part of the letter refers to 
the enclosed minutes. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — C — 3. M r Sharpe, London, 16 Jan. 1773. On the 
Business of St. Vincents. 

Enclosures : — 

1772, Wednesday ', April 1. — Extracts from the Minutes of the 
House of Burgesses of Virginia. Considering the address to be 
presented to the King with reference to the importation of 
slaves from Africa. 
2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extracts from the Minutes of the House of 
Burgesses in Virginia Wednesday April 1 st 1772. 

1772, November 14. — Extract of a letter from a gentleman at 
Antigua to his correspondent in London. 

The Boston Gazette and Country Journal. 

•1773, January 18.— N° 928. 
4 printed pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 8. Boston Gazette of Jan r y 13 {sic), 1773, containing 
Resolves of some Town-Meetings. 

Tea. 

1773, January 19. London. — Observations upon the consumption 
of tea in North America. Even the Indians drink it twice a day. 
Subjoined are two invoices of 6 chests of Bohea tea shipped by A. B. 
and Co. in the "James," George Simpson, Master, on account of 
Mess rs D. and E. Merchants in New York, dated London 1 Sep- 
tember 1770, the one showing on what conditions the American 
merchant is supplied with tea when he can remit money to his agent in 
London to buy at the Company's sales, the other, when he can only 
purchase from the merchants on credit, £41 on six chests being the 
difference. 

4 J pages. 

Doctor C. Morton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, January 21. Royal Society. — Acknowledging Lord Dart- 
mouth's very obliging answer to the application for specimens in Natural 
History from his Majesty's dominions in America &c. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — D r Morton, Jan r y 21 st 1773. Containing Thanks of the 
Royal Society. 

i 2 



132 

[ ] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, Thursday, January 21. — Paper not signed, addressed to Lord 
Dartmouth, Blackheath, calling attention to a letter in that day's Public 
Advertiser addressed to his Lordship. If the assertions are authentic, 
a more barefaced and shameful monopolization of employments 
in the hands of one family or relations never occurred before in any 
country. They are all men of mean birth and damaged character 
and must be objects of hatred and contempt to the Americans. Advises 
him to use all his influence to remove the numerous sinecures of which 
they justly complain. 

2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Anon. Jan. 1773. Respecting Sinecures in America. 



John Thornton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 22. Clapham. — "My Lord, I duly received D r 
Wheelocks Packet & it certainly will be best for the Trust to dispose 
of the remainder of the Fund as soon as they can do it consistently 
& I have no objection to allowing the D r £500 for the Building of the 
School which I shall mention to M r Keen & I see no necessity of a 
meeting for the purpose. By this opportunity T send your LordsP M r 
Occoms Letter of thanks & I inclose a Letter a Friend wrote me from 
the Grenadoes (my partner M r Cornwall's Brother-in-Law) which I 
thought you might not dislike to peruse at your leisure. I am obliged 
to your Lordship for M r Burnetts packet he wrote me M r Crooke the 
Vicar of Huddersfield was given over & I have wrote to M r Weddell 
in behalf of a young Oxonion if he drops but I fear I stand but little 
chance. Your LordsP has probably heard that Lord Shelburn has 
engaged D r Priestley of Leeds to come in March & be tutor to his 
sons & he has £300 a year settled on him for life. (My Hull partners 
Brother) M r Thomas Rennard that I took the liberty of mentioning to 
your Lordship is at Philadelphia but his Family being in England I 
doubt not but he would remove anywhere for a maintenance. M r 
John Fenton now writes his place turns out better than he expected 
tho not half so much as it was represented to be, that if anything could 
be annexed to it, or any small matter given to his son who is five & 
Twenty & purposing to go to him he might I should hope subsist, till 
it might be more convenient to remove him which I submit. 

I am with great regard trusting your LordsP will be an instrument of 
much good. 

My Lord/Your Lordships much/devoted obed & hum Serv^John 
Thornton/M r Fentons Son has a great impediment in his Speech 
that he is not fit for publick life." 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— A— 37. John Thornton Esq* Clapham, 22 d Jan. 1773, 
recommending M r Fenton. V. Cor. p. 12. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 23. London. — Encloses a memorial he has prepared 
to lay before the Treasury, [qy. see the end of the previous year], and 
desires his Lordship's advice about presenting it. Complains of the 



133 

injustice of his antagonist (Governor Grant). Recommends his cause 
to his Lordship's protection. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — M r De Brahm. 

Enclosure : — 

1769, February 15. — James Delaire. Survey of land belonging to 
Lord Grosvenor west of the Leach Shoal East Florida. 
Original signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Lord Grosvenors 12,000 acre behind the Leech 
Shoal. 24 F. 

Hans Stanley to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 23. Privy Garden. — Sends the enclosed extract of 
a letter from Captain Hamond which explains the memorial left in 
the hauds of M r Pownall. 

Autograph, third person. ^ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — H. Stanley Esq. 23 d Jan? 1773 inclosing Memorial of 
Opt. Hammond for Land in Virginia. 

Enclosures : — 

Captain Andrew Snape Hamond to Hans Stanley. 

1772, December 6. u Arethusa " at Neic York. — Relates certain 
information concerning the settlement of the boundary line 
between Virginia and the Cherokees in order to elucidate a 
difficulty raised by Lord Hillsborough respecting his grant. 
Extract. 1§ quarto pages. 

Captain Andrew Snape Hamond to the King. 

1772, April. Williamsburg in Virginia. — Memorial. Desires a 
grant of 20,000 acres of land free of quit rent. 
Original signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 28. Capt. Hammond's Memorial. 

Again endorsed: — Captain Hammond's memorial for land in 
Virginia 1772. 

American Revenue. 

1773, January 25. — J. Williams. An account of the produce of 
the American Revenue and proposing Remedys for extending and 
securing the same. Upon the three articles of sugar, molasses, and wine 
alone, the duties, if put under a proper mode of management, would 
annually amount to £109,333 6s. Sd. This is almost all lost by the 
misconduct of the present members of the American Board who have 
impressed such an idea of their insolence, timidity and ignorance upon 
the whole continent of North America that the people there abhor 
having any transactions with them and all subordination and respect to 
the revenue under their management. Advises a removal of the present 
members of the board (who may be put on half-pay) and the appoint- 
ment of a new one with a respectable, experienced commissioner from 
the mother board in England at the head of it, which would spread 
universal joy through the whole continent. 

Signed. l£ pages. 



134 

Belief of Regiments. 

1 773*, January 26 * ^ ar ^^ ce * — Paper containing copies of letters from 
Lord Barrington of various dates to the different Secretaries of State — 
Lords Shelburne, Hillsborough, Rochford and Dartmouth. With 
reference to arrangements for the relief of the 15 th and 60 th Regiments 
serving in America. 

7 pages. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Patrick Tonyn to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, January 26. New Norfolk Street. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — B— 2. Liet. Col. Tonyn 26 Jan? 1773. Soliciting the 
Gov* of East Florida. 

Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, January 30. War Office. — In answer to his lordship's note of 
yesterday the opinion of the Attorney and Solicitor General has not yet 
been received. Sends a copy of the case which is before them. 

Not autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — War Office 30 th Jan^ 1773. Lord Vise* Barrington 
R/ 31 st . 

Enclosures : — 

Paper headed u Case " giving the opinion of the Attorney General,, 
Sir Fletcher Norton, dated Lincoln's Inn 16 February 1765, 
showing that a foreign officer serving in America may be pro- 
moted to the rank of general officer. Following this are two 
queries as to whether Major- General Haldimand could be legally 
authorised to act as Major- General in America and execute 
the command of Lieutenant- General Gage during his absence. 
Also three printed Acts of an earlier date mentioned in the 
" Case." 

Copy . 2 J folio pages . 

Endorsed: — Case. In Lord Barrington 's Note of 30 th 
Janv 1773. 

1764, September 8. St. James's. — Copy of Warrant to the 
Attorney or Solicitor General to prepare a Bill to pass the 
Great Seal, appointing Major- General Thomas Gage Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Forces in North America. 
Copy. 2| pages. 

1764, November 16. — The King's Commission to Major- General 
Thomas Gage. 
Copy. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of Commission jor Major General Thomas 
Gage, — tinder the King's Sign Manual. 2. The powers 
contained in this comm n appear to be confined personally to 
Gen 1 Gage. Q. If the person upon whom the command 
devolves in Gen 1 Gages Absence, must not have a commission 
with the like powers contained in this. 



135 

Newspaper Cutting. 

[1773, January, about.] — Containing a letter signed " Raleigh " to 
the Earl of Dartmouth, giving an extract of a letter from Boston. 
1 strip. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1773, February 1, Monday. — In Lord Dartmouth's hand. With 
regard to the doubts which have occurred whether General Haldimand 
can take upon him the command of the King's troops in America, it is 
the decision of the lords present that a motion be made in the House 
of Commons for leave to bring in such a bill as shall remove all doubts 
as to the capacity of foreign officers who have served in America to 
accept such rank as the King may confer on them. Consideration of 
Massachusetts papers deferred. 

2 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Minute 1 Feb? 1773. 

Alderman Barlow Trecothick to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 1. London. — Desired to wait upon his lordship to 
introduce the bearer M r Donough, private secretary to Governor 
Wentworth, sent home with a defence against the charge concerning 
the Governor. The general esteem Governor Wentworth has acquired 
is strongly in his favour. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 2. M r Alderman Trecothick 1 Feb? 1773. 

Mrs. Chetwtnd to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 3, Wednesday. St. James's. 
Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Endorsed:— -B — 12. Hon ble M rs Chetwynd Feb. 3, 1773, concerning 
some Lands in New York. 

Enclosure :— 

1772, November 10. Neiu York. — Letter to M rs Chetwynd. Con- 
cerning M r Eriedenberg's land. Before he arrived in Neiv 
York a great part of the land mentioned in his order was 
covered by actual 'patentees. The location which he expected to 
have cannot now be procured. 
Copy. | quarto page. 

Lord Dartmouth to the Earl of Dunmore. 

1773, February 3. Whitehall. — N° 1. Replies to his letters Nos. 1,. 
2, & 3. Encloses copy of declaration made to the Virginia Assembly 
by Lord Botetourt relative to the Governors of that Colony. 

Copy. 31 pages. [A draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 211, fo. 27.] 

Endorsed : — N° 4. Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth 
to the Earl of Dunmore, dated Whitehall, Feb^ 3 d 1773. 
(No 1.) 



136 

Lord Dartmouth to Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

1773, February 3. Whitehall. — N° 6. Remarks on the conduct of 
the Inhabitants of Massachusetts as shown by articles in the news- 
papers. The late M r de Berdt's case. Commissions for the trial of 
pirates. 

Copy. 4J pages. [A draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 174, fo. 47.] 

Endorsed : — N° 9. Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth 
to Gov r Hutchinson, dated Whitehall, Feb^ 3 d 1773. (N° 6.) 



Lord Dartmouth to Governor William Tryon. 

1773, February 3. Whitehall. — Desirability of a decision on the 
claims of the proprietors of the Hardenburgh patent. Thinks the mode 
proposed for bringing on the discussion by a grant to Colonel Bradstreet 
of a part of the lands is not regular or proper. Colonel Bradstreet is to 
be acquainted with this, but assured that Lord Dartmouth will be happy 
on any other occasion to show him every attention due to his services. 
The state of the country West of the Connecticut River has been 
discussed by the Board of Trade and reported to the Privy Council and 
the Lord President promises to take it up the first day the Committee 
meets. 

Copy. 1 1 pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 6. Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth 
to Gov r Tryon, dated Whitehall 3 d Feb. 1773. (N° 5.) 



Lord Dartmouth to the Lords of the Admiralty. 

1773, February 6. Whitehall. — To provide for the embarkation of 
some regiments about the 15 th April. 
Copy. l\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to the 
Lords of the Admiralty dated Whitehall 6 th Febry 1773. 



Lord Dartmouth to the Earl of Rochford. 

1773, February 6. Whitehall. — To inform the Lord Lieut, of 
Ireland that the 47 th Regiment is to go to America. 
Copy, f page. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to the 
Earl of Rochford dated Whitehall 6 th Febry 1773. 



Lord Dartmouth to Lord Viscount Barrington. 

1773, February 8. Whitehall. — To give directions for the various 
regiments required to replace those returning from America, to be in 
readiness. 

Copy. 1 page. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to Lord 
Viscount Barrington dated Whitehall 8 th Febry. 1773. 



137 

Jonathan Carver to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 10. — Memorial. Recounts his services in America. 
For three years past has been without pay or employment. Desires 
relief and an appointment either civil or military. 

Original signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — The Memorial of Jonathan Carver Late a Captain in the 
Provincial Troops in North America. 

Isaac Spooner to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 10. Birmingham. — Fears that if Mr. Quincey's 
petition now before the House of Commons be granted it will be pre- 
judicial to the country ; if they manufacture the steel and send it over 
to England it will greatly injure the home trade, and if the use of tilt 
hammers is permitted it would prejudice that part of the home manu- 
facture. " If they are permitted to make steel, and draw it with Tilt 
hammers, they will soon manufacture it, that being the next step, 
& though the beginning may be small, yet manufacturers will soon 
increase with them to the great prejudice of England, on which I am 
sure I need not enlarge to your Lordship, nor need I mention to you 
how greatly any progress in the Iron & Steel Manufacturies will tend 
to promote the favourite scheme of America ; Independence on (sic) 
this Kingdom. Tilt hammers are of very general utility in allmost every 
Branch of the Iron & Steel manufacturys, being a more expeditious 
and cheaper method of preparing both for their different uses than any 
other, & I think should be absolutely prohibited in America, if we 
have any power to prevent their use there." 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — 10 Feb. 1773. Is. Spooner Esq r Against M r Quincey's 
Petition for making Steel in N. England. 

Relief of Regiments. 

1763, [should be 1773], February 11. Thursday. — Notes, in Lord 
Dartmouth's hand. " That L d R[ochford] considers the letter from 
L d D[artmouth] concerning the Reg* that is to go from Ireland to 
America as irregular." Sir Stanier Porten in giving the message adds 
that he believes the King wishes all orders for this service to be given 
for the future by the Secretary of State for the Northern or Southern 
Department. Lord Dartmouth in reply refers to a precedent in 1768 by 
Lord Hillsborough and proposes to consult the King. His Majesty's 
decision that fresh regulations are to be issued. 

3^ quarto pages. 

Chief Justice Frederick Smyth to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 8. New York. — Containing his remarks and obser- 
vations in connection with the execution of the commission for 
inquiring into the circumstances of the burning of the " Gaspee " 
schooner. 

Copy. 7\ pages. [The autograph signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 195, fo. 29, and 
a duplicate in Board of Trade, Proprieties, Vol. 23, fo. 291.] 

Endorsed: — N° 7. Copy of a Letter from Chief Justice Smyth to 
the Earl of Dartmouth, dated New York Feb^ 8 th 1773. 



138 

Jacob Blackwell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 16. London. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Jacob Blackwell London, 16 Feb 1 "? 1773, (praying 
the Renewal of a Grant of Land in West Florida and that Gov* 
Chester may receive Directions for that purpose). 

Lord Hyde to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 18. — Thinks it a public as well as a private duty to 
transmit the enclosed. 
Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Lord Hyde, 18 Feb r y 1773, inclosing Extract of a 
Letter from Philadelphia, relative to the Services &c. of Col. 
Tryon, now Gov r of New York. 

Enclosure : — 

1772, November 15. Philadelphia. Extract of a letter from 
William Allen to David Barclay. 
Extract. 3\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter from M r Allen of Phila- 
delphia {dated Nov r 15, 1772) to M r David Barclay of 
London, respecting the Services of Col. Tryon, Gov r of New 
York. Rj 18* Feb. 1773. 



Newspaper Cutting. 

1773, February 18.— Cutting from the Public Advertiser N° 11,824, 
containing a further letter signed " Raleigh " addressed to Lord Dart- 
mouth concerning the restrictions laid on American commerce. 

1^ columns. 

Endorsed: — Customs in America. 



Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 18. Boston, New England. — Has obtained a copy 
of the " system " mentioned in his letter of the 6th January. Desires 
his name may be concealed. For the better securing America to the 
British Crown submits a proposal that to His Majesty's titles there be 
added, the Dominions of North America, to keep alive in the minds of 
the Americans that the King of Great Britain is their King. Repeats 
his request for the secretary's office in New Hampshire or that of 
Lieutenant-Governor. Is assured that if he held an important office 
in Government he could contribute much to his Majesty's service. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— W Jos Ward. Boston 18 Feb? 1773. In— B 22. 

Enclosure : — 

Extract from " A System of Government and Civil Policy for 
the United Provinces in North America with observations 
thereon." 

6 1 quarto pages. 



139 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, February 20. Queen's Square, Westminster — Transmitting 
the enclosed paper, which is what he believed his Lordship ordered him 
to make out. " Altho a restored Servant all ways recoveres the whole 

emoluments of his office accrued during his suspension, to 

prove my duty in forwarding peace and tranquility, I raise my demands 
not to the presidential right of restored Servants to the full but 
only half the emoluments accrued in the provincial office since my 
Suspension." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure ;— 

Memorandum concerning emoluments due William Gerard de 
Brahm since his suspension from office. 
Autograph. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — de Brahms pretension of £573-1 8-7 1 as pro- 
vincial Surveyor of East Florida. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 20. Queen's Square, Westminster. — Encloses answer 
he has returned to M r Bercher which he desires to be forwarded. Offers 
some advice in case the agreement with the Society takes place. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

Daniel Bercher to [William Gerard de Brahm]. 

1 773, February 20. Harley Street. — Thinks that if a grant of '6,000 
acres be made, it would be accepted as there are many persons 
who would join and so make it prove beneficial to Lord [Dart- 
mouth] . 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. In French. 



Daniel Bercher to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, February 20. N° 44 Barley Street, Cavendish Square. — 
On the subject of the land which the Earl of Dartmouth is 
willing to grant to the Cape Florida Society. A counter pro- 
posal for 6,000 acres free of all vexatious dues subject solely to 
a perpetual rent o/£300 to commence the 10 th yea?\ 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. In French. 



Land in East Florida belonging to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1773, February 20, about.] — Paper in Lord Dartmouth's hand 
containing two proposals concerning grants of land belonging to him [in 
East Florida] the first being for 3,000 acres, the second for 6,000 on 
different conditions. 

1 quarto page. 



140 

Lord Stamford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 20. Sackville Street. 
Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — A — 3 Earl of Stamford 20 Feb 1 ^ 1773, recommending 
M r Nelson to be of the Council of Virginia. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 24. Queen's Square. — Conversation with M r Bercher 
as to details of rent, fees, etc., with reference to the land to be granted 
by the Earl of Dartmouth in East Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 2 quarto pages. 

The Honourable Mr. Thynne to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1773, February 24.] — At the request of Lord Granville has taken 
the liberty to trouble his Lordship by desiring M r Todd to present 
M r Finlay as a person Lord Granville has appointed to enquire into his 
concerns in North Carolina and prays a mandamus that he (M r Finlay) 
be admitted to the Council there. 

Not autograph, third person. § quarto page. 

Endorsed:— Hon ble M r Thynne (without Date, but rec d 24 th Feb. 
1773) (requesting that M r Finlay, Surveyor of the Posts in 
N° America, may be admitted of the Council of N° Carolina). 

Jonathan Carver to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 25. — Memorial. Necessity there is for the appoint- 
ment of an Indian Superintendent for the country west of Lake Huron. 
From his knowledge of the Indians thinks he could act well in that 
capacity. He could also be employed as a surveyor and draughtsman. 
The Indians desire him to represent them to the King. Prays that his 
case may be taken into consideration. 

Orig ina I signed. 1 § pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 2. The Memorial of Jonathan Carver Late a Captain 
in the Provincial Troops in North America 1773. L/. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, February 27. — " Inclosed is my original Letter with your 
Lordship's corrections." 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

William Gerard de Brahm to Daniel Bercher. 

1773, February 27. Queen's Square, Westminster. — Contains the 
terms upon which Lord Dartmouth consents to grant 6,000 acres 
in the centre of his territory at Cape Florida. His Lordship 
reserves the fine of alienation, to be paid by the purchaser with 
10 p. c. only. Agrees to the Society's proposal of the rent being 
£300, this, however, to be paid after the 5 th year with JBIOO, 



141 

Enclosures-rcont . 

after the 8 th ivith £200, after the 10^ ivith £300, etc. He is to 
acquaint the gentlemen of the Society therewith. 

Autograph letter signed. With corrections by Lord Dart- 
mouth. If quarto pages. 

Autograph copy of the same, signed. 

Mr. Reeve to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1773, February.] N° 12 Craven Street, Saturday morning. — Sending 
the enclosed papers. 

Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

Charles Dudley to [Mr. Reeve]. 

1773, January 19. — Prophesies the failure of the inquiry into the 
burning of the " Gaspee " schooner. The offenders are not only 
safe from detection but ridicule the measures taken to punish 
them. Encloses cuttings. It will hardly be credited that so 
much information as to these measures appeared in print before 
the commission was opened. " Did Lord Dartmouth expect his 
secret letter to be given to the public in a newspaper ? " Is 
persuaded no person will be apprehended while the powers of 
government remain in the present hands or while a man of 
Gov. Wanton's " cast " sits at the Board of inquiry. 
Extract. 3| pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 10. Rhode Island 19 Janv 1773. Mr Dudley 
Collector of the Customs there to M r Reeve. 

1773, January 19. — Newspaper cutting containing a letter signed 
" Americanus" 
1 strip. 

1773, January 19. — Newspaper cutting containing Remarks on 
the Resolution passed at the Rhode Island General Assembly 
25 October 1769. 
35 lines. 

1772, September 4. Whitehall. — Newspaper cutting containing 
an Extract of Lord Dartmouth'' s letter to the Governor of Rhode 
Island [Joseph Wanton] communicating the King's directions to 
investigate the circumstances attending the outrage committed on 
the officers of the " Gaspee " and the burning of that ship. 

1 strip. [Drafts of this letter are in the Public Record 
Office, America and West Indies, Vol. 201, fos. 279 and 373.] 

Troops. 

1773, February. — Arrangement proposed concerning the transporta- 
tion of troops from Great Britain or Ireland to the colonies in Africa and 
America, and as to their return from the colonies. 

3 pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 1. Arrangement respecting the transportation of 
Troops feby 1773. 



142 

The Royal Society. 

[1773, March 1, about.] — Daines Barrington. Suggestions for ob- 
taining natural productions from the colonies. 

Original. 3 pages. [This is enclosed in a letter, placed in the West 
Indian section of Lord Dartmouth's MSS., from the Committee of the 
Royal Society to Lord Dartmouth 1 March 1773.] 

Endorsed: — Daines Barrington Esq 1 '. 

[Board of Trade.] 

1773, March 2. — List of Business for the Committee. 
Two papers. 3£ pages and 2| pages respectively. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 6. London. — Absence of the Colonel (not named). 
Fees he fixed for himself upon undertaking, the provincial office. 
Account of the unjust treatment he received from Governor Grant. 
Expense he has been at and money he has lost. Desires his lordship to 
procure him a vessel and tender that he may go to America for eight 
months to expedite the general surveys. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken). 2J pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 15. — Unjust treatment he experienced from Governor 
Grant in East Florida. Will give up all provincial fees and perquisites 
in favour of M r Mulcaster provided he is paid all fees for lands 
surveyed from 1767, is allowed to draw annually the salary of £150, and 
is reimbursed the expenses he has incurred. 
v Autograph letter signed. With seal. 2\ pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 15. — Map he has made shewing the situation of his 
lordship's territories of 40,000 acres in Cape Florida. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 page. 

Endorsed : — Ex. 

Enclosure ;— 

Daniel Bercher to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, March 13. N° 44 Har ley Street. — There is no difficulty 
in accepting the terms laid down by Lord Dartmouth in his 
letter of 21 th February, excepting that of payment beginning 
after the 5 th year. Asks that the first proposal of payment on 
the 10* A year be acceded to. 

Autograph letter signed. J § quarto pages. In French. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 19. — Sends copy of his answer to M r Bercher. Hopes 
Ms waiting on Lord Dartmouth for orders and the necessary assistance 



143 

•to carry on the King's service in the southern district of North America 
is approved of. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Daniel Bercher]. 

,[1773, March 19.] — Lord Dartmouth gives up the 6 th year, and 
has fixed the rent to begin for the 1 th year at £100, for the 
8'ft at £150, for the 9 th at £200 and the 10 th £300. De Brahm 
thinks the Society ought to understand these are very advan- 
tageous terms. 

Autograph copy. 1J- quarto pages. 

Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 20. Boston, New England. — A plan is in contemplation 
for all people who pay quit-rents to the King to sign an agreement 
never to pay any more and to unite in defending themselves against the 
King's officers. Observations and information on the disposition of the 
people and on the means which might restore harmony. Repeats his 
request for a commission in one of the New England colonies. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed:— W Jos. Ward. Boston 20 March 1773. R. 12 May. 
In B— 22. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 22. — M r Bercher has sent him the enclosed letter. By 
unjust reports of the province the members of the Swizer (or Cape 
Florida) Society are afraid to bind themselves to an obligation before 
the expiration of 10 years. Is willing to become security for 450/., the 
three years' rent, if allowed to return honourably to East Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken). 2 quarto pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Daniel Bercher to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, March 22. Harley Street. — Difficulty concerning the rent 
to be paid the Earl of Dartmouth. Will see the principal 
members again. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 quarto page. In 
French. 



Daniel Bercher to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, March 23. N° 44 Harley Street. — Enclosing a Resolution. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 quarto page. In French* 

Enclosure : — 

1773, March 22. — East Florida Society. Resolution. They 
" give up the 7 th year gratis" and commence on the 8th year 
with £50, the 9** £150, the W h £300. 
Original signed. 1 quarto page. 



144 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Daniel Bercher]. 

1773, March 25. London. — Acquainting him of the Earl of 
Dartmouth's acceptance of the terms laid down in the last resolution of 
the Society. 

Autograph copy. 1 quarto page. 

Minutes. 

1773, March 25.— In Lord Dartmouth's hand. On M r Livius's 
complaints. (New Hampshire.) 
6 quarto pages. 

Kichard Jackson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March 26. — Relative to the Incorporation solicited by the 
Presbyterians of New Jersey. Asks pardon " for having forgot to read 
the New Jersey papers till last night." The charter, as corrected by 
M r Ogden and the Attorney- General of New Jersey, may pass. It 
will amount to nothing more than that of a charitable institution. 

Autograph, third person. \\ quarto pages. 

Note. — In his letter of May 1 1, 1772, Wm. Franklin, Governor of the Province, writes 
to Lord Hillsborough, the Secretary of State, that a Petition from the Presbyterian 
Clergy of New Jersey praying for a charter of incorporation to enable them to raise 
a fund for the support of their widows and children had been presented to him, 
that the Council and the Attorney- General were divided in their opinion as to the 
propriety of taking His Majesty's orders on the subject, and consequently he 
forwards copy of the petition, draft of the charter, reports of the Attorney- General 
&c, for His Majesty's consideration and for permission to pass the said Charter. In 
his letter of 27th February 1773 Governor Franklin reminds Lord Dartmouth that 
no answer of His Majesty's determination had been received, and that he would be 
glad to give a reply to the Petitioners. 

The Bishop of London to Lord Dartmouth. 

] 773, March 27. London House. — Recommending M r Chapman for 
a nomination to Pensacola. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— N° 7, BP. of London March 27, 1773, recommending the 
Rev d M r Chapman. 

Hans Stanley to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, March 28. Privy Garden. — With regard to Captain Hamond' s 
memorial would be glad to know what hopes may be entertained of his 
success. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — 1773 Hans Stanley Esq r . 

Enclosure : — 

Captain Andrew Snape Hamond to [Hans Stanley.] 

1773, January 25. w Arethusa " at Rhode Island. 
Copy. 5£ pages. 

Endorsed : — N° 11. Copy of a Letter from Capt. Hamond 
of the Arethusa , dated Rhode Island, Jan'v 25 th 1773 
relative to the Execution of the Commission of Inquiry 
into the Riot at Rhode Island. 



145 

Lord Barrington to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

773, March 29. Cavendish Square. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A — 7. L d Barrington 29 March 1773, recommending 
L* Col. Leland, for a Gov*. 

The Duke of Manchester to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, March 30. — Concerning his brother Lord Charles Montagu, 
late Governor of S. Carolina. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— A. — 8. Duke of Manchester March 30, 1773, in behalf 
of his Brother to succeed to Dominica. 

Lord Edgecumbe. 

1773, March. — Memorandum concerning Capt. Nicholas Cox, late of 
the 47 th , who has been in the army 32 years. 
Not signed. | quarto page. 

Endorsed : — A — 6. Memorandum from Lord Edgecumbe — Eecom- 
mending Cap* Cox — March 1773. V. Cor. p. 14. 

The Bishop of Ely to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, March. Monday morning. Hertford Street. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 § quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A — 5. Bishop of Ely, March 1773, recommending 
M r Powell for some Law Office in the Colonies. V. Cor. p. 16. 

Charles Smith to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, March. London. — Is engaged in trade with America and once 
in two or three years takes a voyage thither to collect debts. He thus 
rides through the provinces of New England, New York, and 
Pennsylvania. Everywhere he observes a disposition which savours 
too much of rebellion. Advises Lord Dartmouth to read the American 
newspapers which can be got at the coffee-houses. These rebellious 
sentiments are especially prevalent in the back settlements particularly 
of Pennsylvania. Some 8 to 10,000 people were imported there from 
Ireland in one year. These settlements are composed of an uncultivated 
banditti on whom the lawless publications take great effect. Can the 
event be any other in a few years than to throw off their dependence ? 
They are ripe for it. Suggests the need there is to cool and quiet the 
present tumults in New England and to choose the wisest men for 
governors of the different provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 \ pages. 

Copy of the foregoing. 6| pages. 

Lieutenant Thomas Webb to Lord Dartmouth. 

[? 1773, March or April]. — Memorial. Personal injuries sustained 
in military service in America having necessitated his retiring on a 
small civil appointment, begs to assure his lordship that he is the only 

y 82H0. K 



146 

officer in this condition not promoted. Refers to Sir JefFery Amherst r 
General Webb, General Monckton and other officers for testimonials of 
his conduct and character, and desires some post or appointment in New 
York. 

Not autograph. 1 large folio page. 

Endorsed : — N° 4. The Memorial of Lieu* Tho 8 Webb. 

Thomas Macdonough to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, April 3. Charles Street, Westminster. — On the difference 
between the minutes of the New Hampshire Council sent in March 1768 
concerning the conduct of the Vice-Admiralty Court in Newfoundland: 
and those now transmitted. This is a matter separate from any of 
M r Livius's charges. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed ; — Ex. 

Lieutenant John Cartwright to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, April 9. Marnham. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — C — 11. Lieut* Cartwright 9 April 1773, on securing a 
Supply of Oak Timber. 

Lord Dartmouth to Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

1773, April 10. Whitehall. — It is vain to hope that the Council and 
House of Representatives will be induced to yield due obedience to the 
laws of Parliament. Recommends him to avoid any further discussion 
on the subject, and to prorogue or dissolve the General Court, should he 
consider it expedient. 

Copy. 2\ pages. [Draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 174, fo. 215.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Lord Dartmouth to Governor 
Hutchinson dated Whitehall, 10 th April 1773. 

Caleb Jo. Garbrand to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, April 10. — When he first came from East Florida he applied 
himself to painting as a profession. Received a proposal from M r 
Wooldridge to take his appointments in East Florida, where he went a 
second time. Submits to his lordship the difficulties he has met with 
in getting established. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— B— 6. M r Garbrand 10 April 1773. 

Lord Guernsey to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, April 10. Saturday morning. — Recommending M r Franklyn 
to succeed the present Governor of New Hampshire. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto ]jage. 

Endorsed: — A — 10. L d Guernsey 10 April 1773, recommending. 
M r Francklyn. 



147 

The Honourable Thomas Greville to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, April 13. Tuesday morning. — Hopes his brother's request will 
be complied with. He himself would have the greatest advantages to 
travel as a Lord of Trade throughout America and might fulfil any 
objects desired by Lord Dartmouth better than any more important 
person. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Hon: M r Greville 13 April 1773. 



Newspaper Cutting. 

1773, April 15. — Cutting from the Public Advertiser containing 
another letter signed " Raleigh " addressed to the Earl of Dartmouth. 
Concerning a sermon lately preached by the Lord Bishop of St. Asaph. 
Remarks on the wisdom of Lord Dartmouth's policy touching the 
American colonies. 

1| columns. 

The Reverend Doctor Eleazar Wheelock to [Lord 

Dartmouth]. 

1773, April 15. Hanover.— " Right Hon le Sir. May it please your 
Lordship. I esteem it a Singular Favor of Heaven that I may apply to 
your Lordship, and especially in your late dignified Capacity, with 
Confidence that I shall find the Ear, & Heart of a Father, while I have 
no other or higher motive, than the Furtherance of that cause which I 
am confident lies nearest your Heart, and I assure you, my Lord, it is 
only your well known Character, your past Condesensions, the nature 
and importance of the case, together with the Consciousness of the 
Singleness, & uprightness of my Intensions that have inspired a 
Boldness in my present Application to you, and which are all I have to 
rely upon to excuse me without any other Apology for myself. In my 
Letter to Your Lordship of December 28, 1772, with an Address, of a 
number of my Pupils on Your Lordships Advancement to the American 
Administration, I also enclosed two Petitions to His Majesty for the 
royal Favor of two Patents of his ungranted Lands in this Country 
containing 25,000 Acres each free of Quit Rents, the one for the use 
and Benefit of this School, the other for the Encouragement of 
Missionaries, the Support of their Widows, Education of their Children 
&c, and prayed that the royal Mandamus for the same might be given 
to the Governor of New York, whom I then understood to have the 
right of Granting those Lands on the west Side of this (Connecticut) 
River, which Lands were, 'till of late, supposed to belong to this Province, 
and are situate nearer to this School than any other of his Majesty's 
ungranted Lands, on which I designed those Patents should be laid, as 
being most convenient for the Purpose designed, if the Favor Should 
be granted, but we have lately been advised by Reports from several 
quarters which have gaind such credit as to occasion much joy to the 
Inhabitants, that his Majesty has given Orders to the Governor of New 
York to ratify all the former grants of those Lands made by the late 
Governor of this Province, and of course has vacated all the Patents of 
the same Lands granted by the Governor of New York which has raised 
a hope in all who had not a Prospect of personal advantage by those 
new Patents that this step is an Omen that all those controverted Lands 
will revert to this Province. And this is that which has given me 

k 2 



148 

Occasion to give Your Lordship this Trouble, which is humbly to 
bespeak your Lordships Favor to alter those Petitions, if you shall see 
it needful, and it be not too late, that the royal Mandamus may be to 
the Governor of this Province, or to either of them as Your Lordship 
shall see to be proper. I would also beg leave humbly to suggest to 
Your Lordship, the present necessities of myself & Family on account of 
my having no visible means of support adequate to my necessary 
Expences. God has graciously provided for me and mine hitherto, and 
has not left me or them to Suffer, nor am I yet afraid to trust him to 
provide for me while I have a Heart to Serve him, and he has anything 
for me to do for him here, yet it appears to be duty to let my case be 
known to Friends of Ability, while I wait upon God to perform the 
desire of my heart. I yet live in the little Store House which I erected 
for the use of the School, and which is now used for that Purpose, on 
which account my Family is much straitned for Room, and I am not yet 
able to build for myself. I am sensible that Pensions have been much 
confind to a Party. Yet as his Majesty has been made, in some measure, 
sensible of the great utility of this undertaking, to his American 
Dominions, and has been graciously pleased, repeatedly to testify his 
royal Approbation, and especially as the Hearts of all are yet in the 
Hands of God, I have confidence there is some hope of Relief for me by 
a proper Application to him for it, which I wholly submitt to your 
Lordship's wisdom. God is graciously pleased to continue his Loving- 
kindness to this School and the Prospects are yet, I think, greatly 
increasing, some account of which I have given the Honourable Trust, 
which I suppose your Lordship will See. And that God may graciously 
guide you by his Counsel in your high, and important Sphere of Action, 
and make you eminently & very extensively useful to inlarge & build 
up the Kingdom of his dear Son, is the earnest Prayer of him who begs 
leave with Sincerest Duty, Affection and Esteem to Subscribe himself 
Your Lordship's Most Obedient and Most Humble Servant Eleazar 
Wheelock." 

Autograph letter signed. 2J quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—1773. D r Wheelock. 

Governor Lord Charles Greville Montagu to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, April 20. Bath. — Giving reasons for his sudden departure 
from his Government [of South Carolina]. A draft of Lord Dart- 
mouth's answer, not dated, accompanies this letter, expressing concern at 
finding how much his Lordship's health and that of his family had 
suffered from the climate of Carolina. Had been uneasy because of the 
King's displeasure. However, doubts not that the Duke of Manchester's 
explanation of his intentions will satisfy the King. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. Answer 3 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 5. L d Cha. Montagu 20 April 1773, giving Reasons 
for his sudden Departure from his Governm*. 

Minute of the Council of New York. 

1773, April 21. Fort George, New York. — Concerning petition of 
the inhabitants of Spencer Town against their land being included 
within the line of Col. Renselaer's grant incorrectly laid down on the 
map. 

Certified Copy. 1 J pages. 

Endorsed : — Minnets of Counsell on the Deseption Line l fc Coppy. 



149 

Jonas Brown to Nathaniel Cholmley. 

1773, April 23. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Jonas Brown to Nath 1 Cholmley Esq r . April 23 d 
1 773, requesting his Interest in procuring an Office for his Son in 
Georgia or South Carolina. V. his Son's Letter inclosed. In 
A— 12. 

Enclosure : — 

Thomas Brown to Nathaniel Cholmley. 

1173, April 23, Friday. Rose and Crown Inn, St. John Street. — 
Requesting his interest in procuring some office in one of these 
Provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, April 30. — Transmits a copy of the instructions drawn up for 
the Cape Florida Society. Desires the grant may be communicated 
to the principals whenever it is ready. Visit from M r Bercher. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Newspaper Cutting. 

N. D. [1773, April]. — Containing a Letter from "A Friend to the 
Community " addressed to Governor Hutchinson. Reflections upon the 
dispute between Great Britain and her colonies. 

\\ columns, 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, May 4. Queens Square, Westminster. — On subject of 
enclosure. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

William Gerard de Brahm to the Cape Florida Society. 

Information and proposals which will be of use to them in making 
their intended settlement at Cape Florida. 
A utograph. 1 2 pages. 



William Kelly to Lord Dartmodth. 

1773, May 5. Crescent. — Gives his opinion and observations upon 
the advisability of the introduction of corn from America. 
Autograph letter signed. 8 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — C — 2. M r Kelly May 5 th 1773. Thoughts on American 
Affairs. 



150 

Board of Trade to the King. 

1773, May 6. Whitehall. — Representation. With Names of the 
Persons to be inserted in the grant of lands on the Ohio. 

Copy. 29J pages. [A draft of this is in the Public Record Office, 
Board of Trade, Virginia, Vol. 45a, fo. 575.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a representation of the Board of Trade to the 
King on the application of Mess ra Walpole &c. for a grant of 
Lands on the Ohio &c. dated May 6, 1773. 



Sir John Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, May 6. Vine Street, Piccadilly. — Encloses a catalogue of 
plants which might be carried to the new North American or West 
Indian settlements for cultivation and for purposes of trade. Remarks 
on the usefulness of the plan. 

Autograph letter signed, 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— S r J. Dalrymple May 1773. On Botany. 



The Royal Society (by Daines Barrington, Marmaduke Tunstall 
and W m Hudson) to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 0. Crane Court. — Requesting for M r Livius, F.R.S., on 
behalf of whom they applied to his Lordship for a recommendation to 
the Governor of New England, a further recommendation to the 
Governor of New Hampshire. 

Autograph letter signed* 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Royal Society May 6, 1773. 



The Earl of Sandwich to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 6. — Edmund Thomas of the " Squirrell " shall be appointed 
to the first fifth rate that becomes vacant. 
Autograph letter signed, 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — E. of Sandwich for Ed d Thomas. 



Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 8. Massachusetts Bay, New England. — A correspondence 
is now established between the towns and provinces by private com- 
mittees, which is to be further strengthened by committees chosen 
by the Houses of Representatives in all the colonies. Affairs are 
altering visibly and the people are almost universally determined to 
support an independent government unless Great Britain will confirm 
their liberties. Will think himself happy if his information is of any 
use. 

Autograph letter signed, 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Jos. Ward New Eng, 1773. 



151 

Board of Trade to the King. 

1773, May 10. Whitehall. — Report. New Hampshire dispute. 
Copy, 9 J pages. [Duplicate of this is in the Public Record Office, 
Board of Trade, New Hampshire, Vol. 10, fo. 26.] 

Endorsed : — No. 6. Copy of the report of the Lords of Trade on 
the complaint exhibited by Peter Livius Esq r against Governor 
Wentworth, dated May 10, 1773. 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 14. Southampton Street, Co vent Garden. — Since his 
late attendance has received the enclosed letter, which, with papers 
transmitted, informs him of all proceedings relative to the important 
dispute between the Governor and the two Houses, in the late session 
of the General Court ending 6 March. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:— M r Bollan May 14, 1773. 

Enclosures : — 

1773, March 12. Boston. — Mr Erving and others, Members of 
the Council of Massachusetts to William Bollan. The 
Governor has not concurred in their resolution. They do not 
know how he can he compensated without obtaining a relaxation 
■■of the instruction to the Governor on this head. 
Extract. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a letter from sev 1 members of council 
to Mr Bollan. March 12"' 1773. 

\_About 1773, March 12.] — Several Members of the Council of 
Massachusetts to [William Bollan]. " The warrant for paying 
the regal stipends to the judges of our Superior Court being not 
yet arrived and perhaps not yet issued, we desire you will use 
your best endeavours to prevent this pernicious measure being 
carried into execution." 

Extract. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from sev 1 members of Massa- 
chusetts council. 

William Gerard de Brahm to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, May 14. — -As he sincerely wishes well to his Lordship's 
undertaking at Cape Florida he finds this employment both a duty and 
an agreeable entertainment and will do his utmost to assist the settlers. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

William Gebard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth, Member of 

the Royal Society. 

1773, May 25. — On his philosophical and religious researches 
Requests his Lord ship's continued favour. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 J pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Diagram of a new invented copper Athanor dedicated to the Earl 
of Dartmouth by William Gerard de Brahm. 



152 

The Earl of Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 25. Williamsburg. — In favour of M r Foy his private 
secretary to whom he refers his Lordship for information on the subject 
of the clerks of the County Court, fees of commissions, and M r Colden's 
affair. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — A — 13. Private L d Dunmore 13 (sic) May 1773, rec. 
M r Foy. 

John Williams to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 25, Tuesday. — Result of his considerations on appointing a 
new set of commissioners of the Public Revenue. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B— i. M r Williamss, 25 May 1773. On the Commis 
sioners of Customs, No. America. 

B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 27. Kings Bench. — His necessitous situation. Recounts 
his services among the Indians in America since 1759. Difficulties to 
which he has been subjected with regard to his salary. Is assured that 
if the King knew of his sufferings he would not permit the friend of 
Sir William Johnson so long to languish in confinement. 

Autograph letter signed. 8 pages. 

George Clement to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, May 29. At the Bunn House, Field Gate, Whitechapel. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B — 16. M r Clement May 1773. Representing his 
great Distress, and desiring some Employment. 

Major Henry Basset, 10th Regt, to Lord Scarsdale. 

1773, June 1. Detroit. — Death of M™ Basset. Entreats his Lord 
ship's assistance in favour of his children. Has taken three Indians 
who have killed some traders. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — to L d Scarsdale. 

Sir Charles Thompson to Lokd Dartmouth. 

1773, June 1. Old Bond Street. — Recommending Captain Sinclair 
for an appointment in Pennsylvania, the Jerseys, New York or the 
New England provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A — 15. Sir Charles Thompson Old Bond Street, 
June 1 st 1773, recommending Capt. Sinclair. V. Cor. p. 16. Ent. 

[Lord Dartmouth] to Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

[1773, about June 2.~] — Transmits copy of his letter to D r Franklin 
[of 2 June 1773], in consequence of D r Franklin having presented to 
him the Remonstrance and Petition of the late House of Representatives 



153 

of 14 July 1772 to the King and their Petition of 6 March last. 
Instructions how to proceed with the present House of Representatives. 
Whenever they think fit to establish permanently competent salaries 
for the Judges, His Majesty will withdraw the allowances at present 
made and will grant their commissions during good behaviour. He 
will also permit his Governor to receive his salary from the province 
provided that it be not less than 2,000 per annum. 
Draft in PownalVs hand. 3^ pages. 

Endorsed : — Df* to Gov r Hutchinson. 

Instructions to American Governors. 

Submitted to the King by the Board of Trade [3 June 1773]. — Draft 
of Additional Instructions to the Governors of His Majesty's Colonies 
and Plantations in America. 

\3\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra* of Instructions for disposal of Lands in America. 

Colonel Howard to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 3, Thursday morning. — Note. Sending the enclosed. 
Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — N° 6. Col. Howard, concerns Gen. Bradstreet 3 d June, 
1773. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorandum concerning Major General Bradstreefs case. That 
he had laid out seven thousand pounds, etc. 
Autograph. 1 1 pages. 

Endorsed : — M. Gen 1 Bradstreet s Case, in a Note from Col. 
Howard. 

M r Williamos to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 4, Friday morning. St. James's Place. — Submits the 
advisability of establishing an office of Inspector General of the sales and 
grants of land, of the Receiver General's accounts and of the Surveyor 
General's offices in North America, which office he would endeavour to 
discharge with satisfaction. 

Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — M r Williamos, 4 June 1773. In B — 4. 

Samuel Kirkland to [ ... . possibly Dr. Wheelock.] 

1773, June 7. Onvide. — "I bless God for friendship, & the hope 
of its being perfected in the world above." Apologises for not writing. 
Has been collecting materials during the winter and spring for building 
a church and too much engaged in promoting the temporal accommoda- 
tion of his people. His proposed narrative of the live Nations he has 
thrown by for the present. He has attended considerably to translating 
the Scriptures, which he ought to have pursued and neglected less 
weighty matters. " Lnst Monday, we erected our Church 35 Feet in 
Length, 18 feet post — a Gallary at one End. The Indians with my 



154 

Assistance got most of the Timber. I hired a Carpenter and two hewers 
several weeks — the house* was raised by the Indians without the help 
of white people. Several small Towns of Indians assembled in the 

Morning to implore the Divine Blessing The whole was 

conducted with Decency beyond my most sanguine Expectations — not 
one either Man or Woman was the least disguised with strong Liquor, 
nor asked for any more than was given them. Upon a petition from the 
people Sir Win. Johnson has given a Bell. I hope if Things go on well 
to erect a Steeple & finish a House by next Summer." The people 
improve much in husbandry and are inspired with an ambition for com- 
fortable dwelling houses. "Two are already set up 35 by 18 feet seven 
or eight more are upon the Work. I have furnished them with a 
number of Carpenters tools for which I expect some allowance from 
the Boston Board.' , Council held by the Indians at Onondago. Their 
disposition for war seems to abate and their affairs are well settled for 
this season. 

Autograph letter signed. 3§ pages. 

Note. — Samuel Kirkland, though not of Indian blood, had been one of the 
scholars in Dr. Wheelock's Indian Charity School. He was ordained in 1766, and 
spent his life amongst the Indians. See his Life by Rev. S. K. Lothrop, Sparks' 
Biographies. 

The Duke of Manchester to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 8. Huntingdon. — On behalf of his brother the late 
Governor of South Carolina. Recounts the expenses incurred by him 
in consequence of his appointment to that government. 

Autograph letter signed. 3^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 10. D. of Manchester June 1773. 

Governor William Tryon to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773 June 8. New York. — On the subject of the enclosures, which 
■concern the mandamus granted to Charles De Friedenberg. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—New York June 8 th 1773. Governor Tryon. R/ 9 th 
June. 

Enclosure : — 

Surveyor- General Alexander Colden to Governor William 

Tryon. 

1773, May 5. New York. — Returns enclosures. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 
Endorsed:— In Gov r Try on' s of 8 th June 1773. 

Enclosures : — 

1769, May 24. Fort George, New York. — Minutes of 
Council. 

Copy, certified by Goldsbrow Banyar 5 May 1773. 

3 pages. 
Endorsed: — New York 5 th May 1773. State of the 
Proceedings on his Majesty's Order of the \\ th 
January 1769 to grant 30,000 Acres of Land to 
Charles De Freudenbergh Esq r . In Gov r Tryon's 
of 8* h June 1773. 



155 



Enclosures— cont. 



1773, May 5. Survey or- General's Office, Province of 
New York. — Report of Surveyor- General Alexander 
Colden to Governor William Tryon. 
Autograph, 1 page. 

Endorsed : — New York May 5 th 1773 Alexander 
Colden Surveyor Gem. Report of his proceedings 
on a Warr f of Survey Issued by his Late Excellency 
Sir Henry Moore to Survey and Lay out for 
Charles de Fredenberg Esq r the quantity of 30,000 
Acres of Land on the West Side of Lake 
Champlain. In Gov r Tryon* s of 8 th June 1773. 

B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 9. — Gives account of the means by which he gained his 
influence amongst the Indians and other interesting information 
respecting them. 

Autograph letter signed. 7| pages. 

Endorsed:—- In C — 17. 

Testimonial to Joseph Ward. 

1773, June 10. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. — Samuel Langdon, 
D.D. Certificate of the character and loyalty of Joseph Ward. 
Autograph. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed (on a wrapper covering also D r Haven's certificate of the 
13 th ) : — Testimonials of D r S 1 Langdon and D r S 1 Haven, in behalf 
of M r Jo. Ward. In B— 22. 

Charles Garth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, June 12. Devizes. — Concerning the distressed situation of the 
■Government and affairs in South Carolina in consequence of a tax bill 
being rejected by the Council. 

Autograph letter signed. 2f quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— -N° 4. Ch. Garth Esq r 12 June 1773. 

Adam Wood to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, June 12. Great Titchfield Street. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:— B — 10. Ad. Wood Esq r June 1773. Soliciting an 
Appointment in the New Gov* upon the Ohio. 

Testimonial to Joseph Ward. 

1773, June 13. Portsmouth, Province of New Hampshire. — Samuel 
Haven D.D. Certificate testifying to the character of Joseph Ward 
from personal acquaintance. 

Autograph. 1 quarto page. 

(For endorsement see Doctor Langdon's certificate of 10 June.) 



156 

The Reverend William Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 16. Jamaica Plain. — Present sentiments of the 
Americans concerning his Lordship. Congratulates him on having 
escaped the difficulties that must have followed had a discovery been 
made by the court of inquiry at Rhode Island of any concerned in the 
business of the " Gaspee," and had any attempt been made to take 
the accused to Great Britain for trial. Such an event wonld have " set 
the continent into a fresh flame," especially since the Act of Parliament 
making it death to destroy any of the King's ships, stores, etc. and 
authorising the trial in Great Britain. " The affair of the Judges, the 
court of inquiry, and the act, have led the house of burgesses in 
Virginia to set on foot committees of correspondence through the 
several colonies. . . . All open attempts from home to put a stop 
to them will only convince the country of their importance .... & 
hasten a kind of congress." Admiral Montagu has said " that British 
Acts of Parliament will never go down in America, unless forced by 
the point of the sword." His own opinion that Government should take 
things back as far as possible to the state they were in at his Majesty's 
accession. The Lieutenant-Governor by broaching afresh and sup- 
porting through the former assembly the anti-American doctrine of the 
parliament's right in all cases has given disgust to the public, not 
lessened by the fact that the Massachusetts House of Assembly have 
possessed themselves of original private letters written by his Excellency 
and others years ago to M r Weattly [Whately], which they have voted 
" had a tendency to overthrow the constitution of the country and to 
introduce arbitrary power " so that neither the house nor the body of 
the people will have any " confidence in or value for the writers." If a 
change in the government should be made suggests Wm. Pepperrell. 
The Bishop of St. Asaph's sermon is highly approved. Should there be 
a war with France fear may be entertained for Canada. P.S. — The 
committee considering these letters has resolved to petition His Majesty 
for the removal of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal {broken). 1 page. 

Endorsed : — Rev. M r Gordon June 1 773. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. Autograph signed letter. 



Thomas Danforth, Jr., to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, June 17- New England Coffee House. 
Autograph letter signed 1 page. 

Endorsed .— B— £ M r Tho. Danforth Jun r of Boston, June 17, 1773. 
Inclosing a Memorial, and praying for some Office in the Mass. 
Bay. 

Again endorsed : — M r Danforth Jun r of Boston, 1773. 

* 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial and Petition to Loid Dartmouth. 
Original signed. 2f pages. 

Endorsed : — Memorial of M r Tho s Danforth of Boston, re- 
questing some office in the Mass. Bay. In B — 5. 



157 

Loud Hyde to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 18. — Sending the " enclosed voluminous packet." 
Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Governor William Trton to Lord Hyde. 

1773, April 30. New York. — Respecting the enclosures. Asks 
for some solid reward for his services. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Enclosures : — 

Journal of Governor William Tryon's Expedition against 
the Insurgents in the Western Frontiers of North 
Carolina, begun 20 April and continued to 21 June 
1771. 

Signed. In stiff cover. 51^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 1. Gov r Try on 's Journal of hit 
Expedition against the Insurgents of North Carolina^ 
in 1771, R/from Lord Hyde, June 18<* 1773. 

1771, May 1 to June 20. — Orderly Book of Governor 
William Tryorts Expedition against the Insurgents of 
North Carolina. With Return of the Army whilst 
encamped at Hermon Husbands on Sandy Creek 22 May 
1771. 

In red morocco cover. 95 octavo pages and 1 sheet. 
[Duplicate of this is in the Public Record Office, 
Series America and West Indies, Vol. 218, fo. 379, 
having been sent by Governor Try on to Lord 
Hillsborough 2 August 1771 in despatch N° 78. 
The Return of the army, sent in the following 
despatch N° 79, 14 December 1771, is in Vol. 219, 
fo. 10.] 

Endorsed (on a wrapper) : — N° 2. Military Orders 
given by Gov r Try on in his Expedition against the 
Insurgents of N° Carolina, in 1771. 

Governor William Try on. A state of the salary and 

whole Emoluments of the Government of New York 

{exclusive of his Fees on Patents for Grants of Land) 

from the 5 th day of April 1772 to the 5** of April 1773. 

The total amount is 2,40 1/. 3s. lOd. 

Signed. 1 folio page. 

Plan of the Camp and Battle of Alamance the 16 May 
1771. Between the Provincials of North Carolina Com- 
manded by His Excellency Governor Tryon, and Rebels 
who styled themselves Regulators. Surveyed aud drawn 
by C. J Sauthier. 
1 sheet. 



158 



Lord D[artmouthJ to Thomas Cushing. 

1773, June 19. St. James's Square. — Private and Confidential. 
Has laid the petitions from Massachusetts before the King and has 
signified to D r Franklin the commands received from his Majesty 
thereupon. Desires he will thank the Assembly for their favourable 
sentiments expressed about himself. Is concerned at the unhappy 
spirit which has lately prevailed in Massachusetts Bay. Gives his 
opinion on acts lately passed ; also upon the wild and extravagant 
doctrines contained in the answer of the Massachusetts Assembly to the 
speech of the Governor at the opening of the late session of the General 
Court. 

Draft. Part in Lord Dartmouth's hand. 8 pages. [See B. F, 
Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European Archives relating to 
America.] 

Endorsed : — Ex. 



A fair draft of the foregoing. 

Endorsed: — N° 10. Dra* to Thomas Cushing Esq. St. James's 
Square, June 19 th 1773. Private and Confidential. 



The Reverend Doctor G. Berkeley to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, June 20. Canterbury. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Rev. D r Berkeley June 20 th 1773, in behalf of the Rev* 
M r Symonds. 



B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 21, Monday. — Sends some Indian trinkets of which he 
begs his Lordship's acceptance. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 26. Boston, Massachusetts Bay. — The system for a 
commonwealth in America seems by every appearauce to be ripening 
fast. Suggests means by which the various and distinct parts of this 
great empire can be held together under present circumstances. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed .-—Boston 26 th June 1773. M r Ward. R/ 14 August. 
In B— 22. 



Charles Wright to Sir P. Musgrave. 

1773, June 28. Admiralty Office. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B— 8. M r Wright to S r P. Musgrave 28 th June 1773. 
Soliciting an Appointment in the Admty. Office. 



169 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, June 29. Queen's Square, Westminster. — Gives the answer he 
returned to the enclosed letter from M r Eercher concerning land 
granted to the Cape Florida Society. Remarks in connection therewith. 
Advises them not to ask for more land. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Daniel Bercher to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, June 28. Harley Street, Cavendish Square. — Account of a 
meeting of the Directors of the Cape Florida Society T^They 
think that 20 heads of families are not sufficient to make a 
settlement and that 25 or 30 would be better ; this necessitates 
more land. Would be glad if his Lordship would add another 
2,000 acres to the 6,000 already granted. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ pages. In French. 

The Earl of Rochford to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1773, June 29. Berkley Square. — If he is not " particularly engaged 
with regard to the government of the Ohio," desires to recommend 
Mr. Stanton. 

Autograph letter signed. l£ quarto pages. 

The Board of Trade to the Lords Committee of Council for 

Plantation Affairs. 

1773, July 1. Whitehall. — Report. On consideration of the petition 
of Maj. Gen. Bradstreet for confirmation of a tract of 300,000 acres 
purchased by him from the Indians, it is found the proceeding of the 
purchase of such a large tract by a private person cannot be reconciled 
with the spirit and intent of the King's Instructions ; at the same time 
the services and character of the petitioner recommend him to the bounty 
and munificence of His Majesty. 

Draft. 1\ pages. 

Endorsed : — New York. Report to the Lords of the Committee of 
Council for Plantation Affairs on the petition of Major General' 
John Bradstreet. July 1, 1773. Ent d . 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News Letter. 

1773, July 1, Thursday. — No. 3,639. Part only, containing, amongst 
other items, an article signed " Philalethes," a message from the Council 
to the Governor 24 th June, Report of the Committee 25 June upon the 
letters of Governor Hutchinson and Lieutenant Governor Oliver, and 
Resolutions. 

2 printed pages, 

Thomas Irving to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 2. Hay Market.— Concerning the enclosed letter. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 J pages. 

Endorsed .-—Irving, Inspector Gen. of Imports. 



160 

Enclosure : — 

Thomas Ikving to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 2. London. — Account of his services in Boston as 
Inspector General of Imports. Was obliged to leave that 
place in consequence of the resentment of an enraged and 
disappointed faction. Has made various applications for 
redress but hitherto without success. Reasons for desiring an 
exchange with Sir Charles Burdet of Florida. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 



J. H. Livingston to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 2. New York.— On behalf of the Dutch Church of New 
York. 

Original signed. 2 pages. [See B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of 
Manuscripts in European Archives relating to America.] 

Endorsed.— N° 8. Dutch Church of N.York. Letter of Thanks 
& Congratulation July 2 d 1773. 



Dutch Church of New York to the King. 

1773, July 2. — Address signed by J. H. Livingston p : t : praeses. 
Original. 2 pages. [See B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts 
in European Archives relating to America.] 

Endorsed: — To the Kings most Excellent Majesty. An address of 
Thanks from the Minister Elders and Deacons of the Reformed 
Protestant Dutch Church of the City of New York, for the Royal 
Remission of the Quit Rent for the Township of Leyden in the 
County of Gloucester & Province of New York. 



Lieutenant Thomas Webb to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 2. Burlington. — Has searched in the Secretary's office 
at Burlington and found a grant on record to Henry Salter for 10,00C 
acres in Fenwick colony. Mrs. Hayne has to prove her father heir to 
the said Henry Salter and the estate is without doubt hers. Reminds 
his Lordship of his memorial and hopes he will not be forgotten if any 
yacancy happens in Boston, New York, the Jerseys or Pennsylvania. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— N° 4. M r Webb Burlington N. Jersey 2 d July, 1773. 
On M rs Haynes's Claim of Lands. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 5. Queens Square, Westminster. — Anxiety of the Cap* 
Florida Society to have matters brought to an issue. They desire to 
take labourers with them but can secure them only by giving them a 
share of land. Necessity for their obtaining their last request from his 
Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — 1773. M r De Brahm. 



161 



Enclosures 



Map of Cape Florida drawn by William Gerard de Brahm 
showing the situation of the Earl of Dartmouth's land. 
Original. 1 sheet. 

1773, June 30. London. — Letter from, apparently, the Cape 
Florida Society to William Gerard de Brahm. Concerning 
the difficulties connected ivith their obtaining the further grant 
of 2,000 acres. 

Original not signea. 1 quarto page. French. With 
seal. 

Proposal and Plan " Pour forme une colonie sociale de bon et 
habiles Agriculteurs sur les Dommaines d' Amerique de Mylord 
Dartmouth, situe au Cap Florida sur le Golphe Sandwich*' 
Original not signed. 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News 

Letter. 

1773, July 8. Thursday.— -N° 3640. Part only. Containing, 
amongst other items, titles of various Acts passed in the last session of 
the General Court and an article signed " Philalethes." 

2 printed pages. 

The Earl of Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 10. Williamsburg. — Account of what he has done in 
behalf of M r Prior. 

Autograph letter signed, 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — E. of Dunmore July 10, 1773. 

B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 10. — Requesting to be appointed Commissary, Superin- 
tendent &c. among the Indians. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Captain Samuel Hood to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 11. Catherington by Petersfield. — The successor to his 
command of the squadron in North America has been paid 1,500/. for 
his expenses at Boston. Thinks he will appear equally entitled to Royal 
favour. Refers to a memorial presented by him to the King. Craves 
his support with reference to the enclosed. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— N° 38. Capt n Hood. July 11 th 1773, with a Memorial 
to the King. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to the King, beginning, " That your Memorialist has 
been in your Majesty s Sea Service, Thirty three years." 
Autograph copy. 3 pages. 

Endorsed : — Memorial of Capt. Hood to the King, praying 
to succeed as Colonel in the Marines. 

y 82140. L 



162 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News 

Letter. 

1773, July 15. Thursday. — N° 3641. Part only. Containing, amongst 
other items, a further Article signed " Philalethes." 
2 printed pages. 

Captain Gavin Cochrane to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, July 19. Edinburgh. 

Autograph letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B — 9 Capt. Cochran July 19, 1773. Applying for 
Lands at Crown Point. 

Lord Dartmouth to Lord Robert Spencer. 

1773, July 22. — Will make immediate inquiry into the state of the 
Council of South Carolina, and order M r Bull's name to be put down to 
be recommended. 

Autograph draft. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— N° 13. Df* to L d Rob* Spencer 22 d July 1773. 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News 

Letter. 

1773, July 22. Thursday. — N° 3642. Containing, amongst other 
items, another Article signed " Philalethes." 
2 printed pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 23. Queens Square, Westminster. — The injustice to 
which he has been subjected with reference to his appointment in East 
Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Ex. 



William Gerard de Brahm to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, July 23. Queens Square, Westminster. — Is informed that the 
(Cape Florida) Society is only stopped for power to make out sufficient 
lots to give as encouragements to their servants. Acquaints him of 
this in order that his Lordship's pleasure may be known as soon as 
convenient. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

The Duke of Argyll to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, July 24. Inverary. — Desiring leave for Lord William Campbell 
to come to England before taking possession of the Government of 
South Carolina. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 12. D. of Argyle 24 July 1773. Desiring Leave 
for L d W m Campbell to come to England. 



163 

The Honourable Daines Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 26. — Sending the enclosed. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — The Hon ble Daines Barrington 26 July 1773. Relative 
to American Plants, &c. 

Enclosure : — 

Prince Masserano (Spanish Ambassador to England) to 

Mr. C. Morton. 

1773, April 30. Aranjuez. — Desires he will express his thanks to 
the Royal Society. Has procured orders from the King (of 
Spain) that the Royal Society should receive from his American 
dominions any productions called for provided a return is 
allowed of any natural curiosities of his Britannic Majesty's 
dominions. 

Translation. 2 quarto p *ages. 

Endorsed: — Prince Masserano to Z> r Morton, Aranjuez 
30 April 1773. 



The Duke of Manchester to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, July 26. Kimbolton Castle. — His brother's health is re- 
established and he can wait upon his Lordship when convenient. 
Autograph letter signed. I quarto page. 

Endorsed: — N° 11. D. of Manchester July 1773. 

Sir Sydney Stafford Smythe, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, 

to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 29. Chelmsford. — Recommending Captain Cox for some 
employment in the new settlement on the Ohio or as collector or 
comptroller of the Customs in any of the ports in America. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A — 19 L d Ch : Baron Smythe. July 1773, recom. Cap. 
Cox. 

Lord Robert Spencer to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, July 29. De la pre (?). — Receipt of letter; returns thanks. 
Autograph tetter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Rob. Spencer 29 July 1773. In N° 13, Domestic. 

Governor Thomas Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, July. — With a newspaper cutting of six lines which states that 
M r Pownall has accepted the Government of New England. Cannot 
account for the above paragraph getting into the newspaper. For many 
months has cautiously avoided talking of America and has risked the 
good opinion of his friends there by suspending all correspondence. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 14. Gov r Pownall July 1 773 

L 2 



1G4 

The Honourable Daines Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 1. King's Bench Walks. — Will do his best to contrive 
that a small collection of natural productions be prepared to be sent to 
the King of Spain. The Royal Society will require his Lordship's 
further protection with regard to the expense which will be incurred in 
preserving specimens that may come from America or elsewhere. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 j quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Hon. D. Barrington 1 Aug. 1773. 

J to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 2. London. — A letter signed "Fact." On the ob- 
jectionable paragraphs which appear in the newspapers, particularly in 
the Public Advertiser. These are concerted by M r Temple, Lieutenant 
Governor of New Hants, assisted by M r Lee. Confidential letters of 
Hutchinson, Oliver and Paxton to the late M r Whately were procured 
immediately after his death by Temple from Whately's brother, a banker 
in Lombard Street ; they were sent to persons in Boston who kept them 
until an opportunity offered for laying them before the Assembly. The 
paragraphs which recommend that some one be sent out as a grand 
reconciler and umpire between Great Britain and the Colonies, come 
from Governor Pownall, but the taunting sneering paragraphs and letters 
come from M r Temple. 

Original. 2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—Fact, 2 Aug. 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

Newspaper cutting containing a letter signed " An American " 
and addressed to Lord Dartmouth. His Lordship was designed 
for private not for public station. He has been rashly prevailed 
upon to undertake the superintendence of American affairs at 
a time when they were hourly hastening to a most unfortunate 
catastrophe. Lord Hillsborough foresaw this and prudently 
retired. Remarks on the scandalous manner in which the 
Americans have been traduced as appears by the disclosure of 
the letters of Mess rs Hutchinson and Oliver. 
1 strip. 

Caleb J. Garbrand to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 2. — Is now fully aware of the impropriety of the 
manner in which M r Wooldridge proposed to dispose of his civil 
employments in East Florida, but was ignorant at the time he made it. 
A foolish transaction of M r Wooldridge's in the West Indies makes him 
fear that he will be unable to pay him the money he owes. Desires his 
Lordship's protection in enabling him to return to East Florida to take 
up the civil employments held by M 1 Wooldridge. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mr. Garbrand 1 (sic.) Aug. 1773. In B — 6. 

Lord Hyde to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 5. The Grove. — Should the government of New 
Hampshire or the surveyorship of woods in America become vacant 
Colonel Howard would be glad of either appointment. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— A— 23. L d Hyde Aug. 1773. Col 1 Howard. 



L65 

The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News 

Letter. 

1773, August 5. Thursday. — Part only. Containing, amongst other 
items, another article signed " Philalethes." 
2 printed pages. 

Endorsed (on a wrapper covering also the Gazettes of 1, 15, and 22 
July):— N° 13. Defence of Gov r Hutchinson's Letters. August 
1773. 



John Stuart to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773; August 5. Charles Town. — On behalf of his brother Lieutenant 
Patrick Stuart of the " Centeaur." Desires his Lordship's good offices 
with Lord Sandwich in his favour. 

Autograph letter signed. LJ- pages. 

Endorsed : — J. Stuart Esq r Charles Town 5 Aug. 1773. 

Grey Cooper to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, August 6. Treasury Chambers. — Desiring he will attend the 
Treasury Board on Thursday next. 

Autograph, third person. ^ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — M r Cooper. 



C[harlotte], Countess of Dunmore, to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 10. Berkley Street. — On behalf of Captain Foy who 
went to America with Lord Dunmore as secretary while at New York, 
whence he accompanied him to Virginia. A vacancy has happened in 
the naval office at New York by the death of M r Williams. If his Lordship 
would confer this on Captain Foy, Lord and Lady Dunmore would 
feel essentially obliged. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Css. of Dunmore Aug. 1773 Cap. Foy. 



Governor Thomas Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 10. Chesterford. — He has seen Lord North. His 
Lordship and Lord North have only to decide how his services can be 
most usefully employed. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— K° 15. Gov 1 ' Pownall 10 Aug. 1773. 



Peter Duval to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 11. Hackney. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — B — 19. M r P. Duval 13 Aug. 1773, requesting an Office 
in N° America. 



166 

Sir William Draper to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 12. George Street, Hanover Square. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — A — 24. S r W. Draper 12 Aug. 1773, recommending 
M r Delancey to be Naval Officer of New York. 



Dennis de Berdt to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 14. London. — Thanks for effectual service in his 
affair with the House of Representatives at Boston. Wishes to know 
if he would care to be concerned with his brother-in-law in some shares 
for land in the Jersey Society. M r Reed is ambitious of opening a 
correspondence with his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— C — 7. M r De Berdt, 12 (sic) Aug. 1773 on American 
Lands. 



John Thornton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 14. Clapham. — Encloses (not here) a duplicate of what 
he had previously sent. The greatest difficulty in America appears to 
lie in the exasperation of both sides. Desirability of removing persons 
that are so obnoxious to the province. Surely a steady, considerate, 
and judicious governor might be found who would have the good of 
the province at heart. Lady Huntingdon has requested the Reverend 
M r Piercy to come over to consult with her about the Orphan House, 
An Irish lottery in consideration to raise 300,000/. Irish, 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 



George Rice to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 15. Windsor Castle. — In favour of Captain Foy for 
whom application has been made for the post of naval officer in New 
York. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — G-. Rice Esq 1 ' 1773, Aug. Cap. Foy. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 16. At M rs Smith near Queens place Westminster. — 
On the subject of the salary due to him. Offer made by Governor 
Tonyn to settle his affairs. Desires to be restored to the provincial 
office and to return to the execution of the general surveys by his 
Lordship's order. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed.— M r De Brahm 16 Au^. 1773. 



■&« 



William Gerard de Brahm to [ 






1773, August 18. At M rs Smith 2 d door South of Queens Place 
Westminster. — Possibly to M r Pownall. Finds some members of the 
[Cape Florida] Society intend to call upon him with M r Stokes. Encloses 



167 

these copies as they may be necessary for conversation, otherwise would 
have sent them to his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. ^ quarto page. 

Endorsed: — East Florida Society. 

Enclosures : — 

Daniel Bercher to [William Gerard de Brahm]. 

1773, August 18. — On the subject of the terms under lohich it has 
been arranged that the land in East Florida should be granted 
to the Society. Insists that they are not suitable for a Society 
of free persons who are risking their lives and fortunes In- 
timates that De Brahm'' s object is to discourage the plan, 
Copy. 2\ pages. In French. 

[William Gerard de Brahm] to Daniel Bercher. 

1773, August 9. — Is sorry he has been induced to believe the grant 
disadvantageous with regard to its tenor. Remarks on the quit 
rent and the generosity of the terms. 
Copy, 1 page, 

William Gerard de Brahm to the [Cape Florida] 

Society. 

1773, August 18. — Defending himself against M r Bercher's mis- 
representations concerning the grant and terms upon which it is 
made. 

Autograph copy. 1§ pages. 

Lord Craggs Clare to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, August 18. Gosfield. — In favour of Captain Foy who has 
been recommended by Lord Dunmore to the late naval officer's post at 
New York. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d Clare Aug. 1773. Cap. Foy. 

John Woddrop to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 18, Wednesday. Tolbrook Glasgow. — Is imprisoned 
on account of a debt of £10 he owes James M c Call because he will not 
renounce to him his right and title to some lands in Virginia. Account 
of the injustice he has met with from him. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — John Woddrop Glasgow Aug. 18, 1773. 

William Bollan and Doctor B. Franklin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 20. Southampton Street, Covent Garden. — Trans- 
mitting the enclosed letter. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— M r Bollan 20 Aug. 1773. 



168 

Enclosure : — 

Massachusetts Council and Assembly to Lord Dartmouth. 

June 29. Province of Massachusetts Bay. — Signed Thomas 
Flacker, Secretary. " The original causes of the interruption in 
the union that formerly subsisted between Great Britain and 
her colonies may probably be found in the letters sent from 
hence to Administration and to other gentlemen of influence 
in Parliament, since the appointment of Sir Francis Bernard to 
the Government of the province" Apprehend that he and his 
coadjutors laid the plans for the establishment of the American 
revenue and have since prevented the petitions against it from 
reaching both King and Parliament. They are of opinion that 
if things were brought to the general state in which they stood 
at the conclusion of the late war it would restore the hctrmony 
which at that time existed, 

S^ pages. [Duplicate of this is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 174, fo. 719.] 

Cape Florida Society to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 20. London. — Signed by James Samuel Loup, 
J. Jam 8 Bonhole, Daniel Bercher and Henry Dessoulavy, intended 
Directors. Cannot discover in the draft of grant of 8,000 acres drawn 
up for Lord Dartmouth by the agent, M r De Brahm, any sign of his 
Lordship's benevolence. Are thankful they are provided with a sufficient 
quantity of common sense to distinguish the real and generous intentions 
of his Lordship from the oppressive disposition of the agent. 

Letter signed. 2 pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Objections made to the draft copy of a grant of 8,000 acres of land 
in East Florida {delivered by William Gerard de Brahm) said 
to be by order and with the approbation of the Earl of Dart- 
mouth. With Terms and Conditions which the grantees take 
the liberty to offer the Earl of Dartmouth. 
Original. 3 pages. 

Mary Hayns or Hayne to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1773, August 21. London. — Concerning the will of her father 
M r Richard Salter, which, or a copy of which, she requests he will 
endeavour to procure. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed .— M rs Hayne Aug. 1773.^ 

Thomas Cu suing to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 22. Boston. — Thanks his Lordship for the communi- 
cation of his sentiments in his letter of 19 June. Gives an account of 
the manner in which the controversy between the Governor and the 
Assembly arose. Observations respecting the temper and disposition of 
the gentlemen who composed the late House of Representatives. Thanks 



169 

his Lordship for the assurance of his aid and support to any temperate 
representation of grievances that the province may make. Hopes that 
the letter of the two Houses to his Lordship of 29 June will answer that 
purpose. Submits whether it would not be eligible for Parliament to 
take up American affairs upon their own principle without any apparent 
attention to the applications made by the Americans for redress. 
Autograph letter signed. 5§ pages. [Reproduced in B. F. Stevens's 
Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European Archives relating to America. J 

Endorsed:— N° 11. M r Cushing Boston 22 Aug. 1773. 
Duplicate of the foregoing. 



The Earl of Rochford to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1773, August 26. — On the subject of enclosure. Did a great deal of 
business for him yesterday at the Council. Everything goes on quietly, 
hopes they will not meet the Parliament as soon as was expected. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— L d Rochford 26 Aug. 1773 w th Col. Prevost's Memorial. 

Enclosure : — 

Lieutenant Colonel Augustine Prevost to the King. 

Memorial. Relinquished his post to Haldimand in 1755, and in 
1762 was sent to take possession of Pensacola. On Haldimand 's 
succeeding Lieutenant General Gage he hoped to have been 
appointed in his room. In the case of Lieutenant Governor 
Colonel Dalling being promoted desires to succeed him. 
Not signed. 1§ quarto pages. 



Reverend Willtam Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 28. Jamaica Plain. — Sends intelligence of the measures 
likely to be taken by the Assembly at their next sessions. Remarks 
upon his Lordship's letter to Doctor Franklin which he has seen. 
Though the King acting consistently could not but disapprove of 
calling into question the right of Parliament to make laws binding in 
America in all cases whatsoever yet the prevailing sentiment is that the 
British legislature has not that right. Was grieved " that his Lordship's 
letter should suggest, that the doctrines held forth in the petitions and 
remonstrance, might be owing to the artifices of a few who seek to create 
jealousy and distrust; for individuals though not intended might think 
themselves aimed at ... . and have their minds soured into a 
stiffer opposition to all healing measures," and without the concurrence 
and assistance of such individuals no measures are likely to be adopted. 
Thinks there should be a petition for the removal of complaints. Their 
politicians depend much on the correspondence set on foot by the 
Virginians and on the apprehension of a French war for an opportunity 
of insisting on an equivalent to a bill of rights. Would like to know if 
a petition would be supported in Parliament as he might be able to 
promote and procure such a one. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal {broken). 1 page. 

Endorsed .— Rev d M r Gordon 28 Aug. 1773. 



170 

William Whately to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 30. Lombard Street. — Has endeavoured, hitherto 
fruitlessly, to find out by what means the letters written to his late 
brother by Governor Hutchinson, M r Oliver and others fell into the 
hands of the Bostonians. In the month of October last M r Temple 
applied to him saying that he wished to see a paper relative to the 
colonies transmitted to his late brother and also a letter written by 
him (M r Temple). In perfect confidence he laid before him various 
parcels of letters and after some time spent in search M r Temple 
acquainted him that he could not find his own letter nor anything 
relating to it. On receiving recently M r Oliver's communication as to 
the publication of the letters he immediately went to M r Temple and 
said to him that he was the only person who had had access to them. 
M r Temple assured him in the frankest manner and in precise terms 
that he had not taken away the letters, and indeed had seen so little of 
importance that he did not even take any extract or memorandum. 
The matter gives him deep and anxious concern both as regards his 
brother's memory and his own character. 

Autograph letter signed. 3| quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r W. Whateley 30 Aug. 1773. Relative to the Letters 
of Gov r Hutchinson &c. published at Boston. 

Note. — In connection with this subject and the resulting duel between Whately 
and Temple, see Sparks's Works of Franklin, Vol. IV., page 105, " An Account 
of the Transactions relating to Governor Hutchinson's Letters." Franklin, writing 
to the Printer of the Public Advertiser, says : — " M r W[hately] could not com- 
" muni.cate them, because they were never in his possession ; and, for the same 
" reason, they could not be taken from him by M r T[emple]," p. 435. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, August 31. At M rs Smith, Queens Place Westminster.— 
Refers to enclosures. His own affairs. Has been paid his salary. 
Deplores that his grievances have been left so long to a Governor who 
only contemplates his ruin. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 f pages. 

Enclosures : — 

William Gerard de Brahm to the President of the 
(Cape Florida) Society 

1773, July 30. — Expresses Lord Dartmouth 9 s good ivishes with 
reference to the grant he is making the Society. Governor 
Tonyn has promised to afford his protection and assistance. 
Autograph letter signed. % page. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Daniel Beecher. 

1773, August 9. — \_See duplicate above enclosed in letter of 
18 August.'] 

Autograph copy signed. 1^ pages. 

Daniel Bercher to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773, August 18. No. 44 Jfarley Street. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 2 pages. French, 



171 

Enclosures — cont. 

William Gerard de Brahm to the [Cape Florida] Society. 

1773, August 18. — [See duplicates of both these above in De 
Brahm' s letter of 1 8 August. ~\ 

Autograph letter signed. \\ pages. 

Lord Dartmouth to the [Cape Florida] Society. 

1773, September 1. Sandwell. — In answer to a letter signed by 
M r Loup and others containing their objections to the terms of the 
grant. The draft given them by De Brahm was drawn up by Lord 
Dartmouth's instructions who thought he had exactly adhered to the 
plans and proposals of the Society. Some things are now expected of 
him with which it is not in his power to comply. The whole project 
may be dropped or the draft may be settled between his lawyer, 
M r Wilmot, and their own. 

Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Major Gavin Cochrane to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, September 2. London-. — Refers to his application for lands at 
Crown Point. Would like to know how his Lordship received it. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Maj r Cochran 2 Sep. 1773. In B— 9. 

Lieutenant- Colonel Thomas Desbrisay to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 4. — Dublin. 

Autograph letter signed. 1-^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 4. L* Col. Desbrisay Sep r 1773 respecting Lands, 
and desiring to succeed to the L* Gov* of the Mass. Bay, in case of 
a Vacancy. 

] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 4. — A letter signed " Fact." Concerning the 
contents of the enclosed newspaper. The intelligence extraordinary 
is the production of M r Temple as are other sneering paragraphs 
scattered through the daily newspapers. 

Original. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Fact, Sep r 4, 1473. 

Enclosure : — ■ 

1773, September 4. Saturday. — The Public Advertiser N° 11976. 
4 printed pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1773, September 6, about.] — Acknowledges the interest taken by 
his Lordship in his affairs. Observations relative to the Cape Florida 
Society. Has many times thought they meant to desist. Hears 
M r Wooldridge is arrived. Remarks relative to the enclosed letter 
from M r Peyer Imhoff. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 



172 

Enclosures : — 

William Gerard de Brahm to Mr. Loup. 

1773, September 6. Monday morning. — Transmits a letter received 
from Lord {Dartmouth). 

Autograph copy. Third person, \page. 

Endorsed : — Copy to M r Loup. 

J. L. Peyer im Hofp to [William Gbrard de Brahm]. 

1773, July 15. James Island, South Carolina. — The reason 
M r Roux did not go to East Florida was because he heard 
there tvas no settlement at the Gulf of Sandioich. His death. 
Fresh orders sent to Governors concerning granting lands. 
Fears that the grant in East Florida may come under the new 
regulations. Would the 6,000 acres for M r Roux be transferred 
to his family? His {De Brahms') friends desire very much to 
see him. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 J quarto pages. French. 

Endorsed : — M r Peyer Imhoff. 

The Earl of Eochford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 7. St. James's. — As M r Walpole and his associates 
are uneasy at the delay of their grant, sends the Attorney and Solicitor 
General's report relative to the order of council of the 3rd of last July. 
Observations in connection therewith. Sends other papers on the 
subject. 

Letter signed. 4 pages. 

Endorsed .— E. of Rochford 7 Sep r 1773. 

Enclosures : — 

1773, July 3. Council Chamber, Whitehall. — Order of the Lords 
of the Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs. To 
prepare a draft of the Ohio grant containing the conditions and 
7'eservations proposed by the Board of Trade 
Copy. 1 page. 

1773, July 16. — Edward Thurlow and Alexander Wedderburn, 
Attorney and Solicitor General. Report to the Lords Com- 
mittee of Council for Plantation Affairs. 
Copy. 3 pages. 

[Not dated. ] — Thomas Walpole, John Sarj ant, Doctor Franklin 
and Samuel Wharton. Memorial to the Lords of the Treasury 
with the bounds of the tract applied for. 
Copy. 2 pages. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to the Earl of Rochford. 

1773, September 9. Sandwell. — Thanks him for communication of 
the report of the Attorney and Solicitor General in consequence of 
the order of Council of 3 July. Agrees with him in his opinion con- 



173 

cerning the objections made by those gentlemen to the mode of granting 
in joint tenancy. Believes the bounds are as clearly and distinctly 
ascertained as the knowledge of the country will admit of. 
Autograph copy. 1 page. 

Captain George Lehunte to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 17. Wexford.— Requests he will lay the enclosed 
memorial before the Board of Trade. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .—George Lehunte Eq r 17 Sep r 1773, re d 15 Oct r . 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to the Board of Trade. 

Desires to settle in North America and prays for a grant of 10,000 
acres of land in one of the provinces. 
Autograph signed. 1 quarto page. 

The Reverend William Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 18. Jamaica Plain. — His Lordship having written 
a confidential letter to the Speaker has given alarm to the gentlemen 
who have been in connection with Sir Francis Bernard. They think 
it beneath the dignity of a Secretary of State to correspond with the 
speaker of a petty provincial assembly. Warns him that their feelings 
will give a partial cast to the letters transmitted to the Government. 
Relates the manner in which he became acquainted with this fact. 

Autograph letter signed, \page. 

Endorsed .— Rev d M r Gordon Jamaica Plain 18 Sep r 1773. 

David Pryce to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, September 18. Upton Grey near Basingstoke. — His un- 
successful endeavours to obtain land granted to him in New York for 
his services in the late war. Is informed all lands are located. Desires 
to be recommended to His Majesty for some equivalent for his great 
loss. 

Autograph letter signed, 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Dav d Pryce Esq r Sep r 1773 for Land in Am a . 

Edward Foy to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, September 22. Mount Street. — Will be happy if the enclosed 
observations are of use in directing his Lordship's choice of locations 
and if he should be employed to put the plan in execution. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— C— 4. Ed. Foy Esq r Sep r 1773. With Observations 
on the Land of sev 1 Districts in the Colonies. 

Enclosure : — 

Observations beginning " The Western parts of Virginia contains 
(sic) a great quantity of unpatented lands." 
Original not signed. 6 quarto pages. 



174 

The Earl of Rochford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 23. St. James's. — Has well considered the report of 
the Attorney and Solicitor General relative to the grant to the Ohio 
Company. Thinks an order of Council may be made with the greatest 
propriety agreeable to the enclosed draft. If his Lordship approves of 
it, will call a council. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— Earl of Rochford 23 Sep r 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

Ohio Company. 

Draft of a proposed Order in Council. Concerning the grant to 
the Ohio Company. 
4 pages. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 24. London. — Sends the second part of his report 
which relates solely to East Florida, and remarks thereon. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 page. 



Julian Legge to Lord Dartmouth, 

1773, September 27. M rs Lloyds, Hemlock Court, Carrey Street, 
near Lincolns Inn London. — Addressed to His Lordship at Sandwell 
Hall near Birmingham. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — B— 3. M r Julian Legge Sep 1 ' 1773 late Midshipman of 

the Lowestoffe, desiring Employm*. 



George Wentworth to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, September 28. London. — Sends copy of his petition to the 
King and entreats his Lordship's patronage and protection. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — George Wentworth Esq r 27 Sep r 1773. 

Enclosure :- — 

George Wentworth to the King. 

1773, September 27. London.— Petition. Account of the injustice 
he has undergone in endeavouring to obtain a legacy of £1000 
left to George Wentworth, petitioner's uncle, by his father John 
Wentworth in 1730. Implores justice from the King. 
Signed copy. 3^ pages. 

Benjamin Hallowell to John Pownall. 

1773, September 29. Boston. — Unsettled state of the province. 
Surprise caused by M r Temple having ingratiated himself into the 
favour of those in power in England. In the earliest of the disturbances 
in America it is known that he took a leading part in the opposition. 



175 

Since he has been in England the intelligence he has given has been as 
mischievous as that of Doctor Franklin. Satisfaction felt at M r Cushing 
receiving a letter from Lord Dartmouth as it appears as though his 
Lordship had ignored the Governor. Difficulty Governors have always 
had to please the people in this province. Attitude of the Government 
of Rhode Island concerning the inquiry into the loss of the " Gaspee." 
Remarks on importation of tea. Suggests measures for securing duties 
and preventing smuggling. Further remarks respecting M r Temple 
who must be violently imposing on his superiors. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 pages. [Reproduced in B. F. Stevens's 
Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European Archives relating to America.] 



Lieutenant Governor H. T. Cramahe to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 1. Quebec, — Proceedings in the running of the 
boundary line between New York and Quebec. Before it receives the 
royal sanction the inhabitants of this Province beg the King to take 
into consideration how much the interference of New York upon the 
course of the river St. Lawrence may injure their commercial interests, 
especially in the fur trade of which the New Yorkers have already a 
considerable share and which their superior wealth would probably put 
them in full possession of. 

Copy. 3 pages. [The signed letter, in duplicate, with the enclosure, 
is in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, Vol. 9, 
fo. 20, and Board of Trade, Canada, Quebec, Vol. 7, fo. 245.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Lieut. Governor Cramahe to the 
Earl of Dartmouth dated Quebec October 1 st 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

Quebec. Minutes of Council. 

1773, August 2 and 4. Council Chamber Castle of St. Lewis 
Quebec. — Report on the running of the western boundary 
line. 

Copy. 6f pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of the Minutes of His Majesty's Council of 
Quebec, the 2 d and 4 th of August 1773. In Lieu* Gov r 
Cramahe' s (No 8) of 1** October 1773. 



Archibald Duff to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 2. — In behalf of his brother Arthur Gordon to be 
Advocate General of the Court of Admiralty in East Florida. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



The Honourable Lucius Ferdinand Cary to [Lord 

Dartmouth.] 

1773, October 4. Grosvenor Street. — Is concerned that his application 
has not met with better success but comforts himself with the thought 
of obtaining his Lordship's good offices on a future occasion. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— Hon ble M r Cary 4 Oct r 1773. 



176 

The Alarm, No. 1. 

1773, October 6. — Printed paper entitled " The Alarm " No. 1, con- 
sisting of a letter signed Hampden, dated New York 6 October 1773 and 
beginning " My dear Fellow Citizens." Against monopolies, particularly 
the East India Company. 

If pages. [Duplicate of this is in the Public Record Office, Series 
America and West Indies, Vol. 183, f"o. 92 L ; and copies were presented, 
with other American papers, to the Houses of Parliament 7 March 
1774.] 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 6. New York. — Intends deferring his departure until 
the spring. Presumes he is to leave the seals of Government with 
Governor Colden who is 86 years of age and in feeble health. In case 
of his death, could he leave the great seal with Chief Justice Hors- 
manden or Sir William Johnson ? 

Autograph letter signed. 4 pages. 

Endorsed :— Gov* Trvon 6 Oct r 1773. 



Governor Lord Charles Greville Montagu to [Lord 

Dartmouth]. 

1773, October 7. Bath. — Upon the enclosed petition. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:— L d Cha Montagu 7 Oct r 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

Lord C. G. Montagu, Lady Elizabeth Chaplin and seven 

others, to the King. 

Petition. On belt a If of Ann Beckett who was convicted in August 
1771 of privately stealing a purse and sentenced to transporta- 
tion for 7 years. She went to Charles Town South Carolina, 
entered the service of Lord Charles Greville Montagu whom she 
served faithfully for two years. Petitioners have always 
believed in her innocence and entreat that the remainder of 
her sentence may be remitted. 
Original signed. 3 pages. 



Thomas Danforth to John Pownall. 

1773, October 8. Boston. — Expresses his acknowledgments for the 
kindness and favour received from M r Pownall. Found upon his 
arrival at Boston that the publication of the letters had greatly increased 
the prejudices of the people. Cause of the odium brought against Gov. 
Bernard and other officers by the people. Educational differences in 
Britain and New England largely account for the disposition of the 
people with regard to politics. The description he has given of Lord 
Dartmouth has been received with great pleasure. 

Autograph letter signed. 3^ quarto pages. 

Enaorsed .•— M r Danforth Ex. 



177 

Order in Council. New Hampshire. 

1773, October 8. St. James's. — Approving a long report of the 
Lords Committee of the Council for Plantation affairs with reference to 
the complaint of Peter Livius against Governor Wentworth. As the 
report concluded that there was no foundation for any censure on the 
Governor, nor for any of the charges brought against him it is hereby 
ordered that the said complaint of Peter Livius be dismissed. 

Copy. 10 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 7. New Hampshire Copy of order in Council. 

" The Alarm," N° 2. 
1773, October 9. — 2 printed folio pages. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, October 11. New Norfolk Street. — Recommending M r John 
Leadbeater for the appointment of Minister and Schoolmaster in East 
Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— N° 8. Gov r Tonyn 11 Oct r 1773. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 11. — Will always retain the highest sense of hi* 
Lordship's patronage. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— N° 9. Gov r Tonyn, 11 Oct. 1773. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 16. New Norfolk Street. — Concerning his recom- 
mendation of M r Leadbeater for the appointment of minister in East 
Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— N° 10. Gov r Tonyn 16 Oct r 17/3. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 18. — On the same subject. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— N° 1 1. Gov r Tonyn 18 Oct' 1773. 

Robert Hayne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, October 19. N° 43 Shoreditch London. — Concerning estates 
which rightly belong to his wife in America but which cannot be 
claimed on account of the difficulty in procuring the will of Richard 
Salter. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed:— M r Hayne 19 Oct r 1773. 
y 82140. M 



178 

Robert Hayne to Lord Dartmouth. 

Not dated, — Petition. With a memorandum concerning the will of 
Richard Salter. 

Original, not signed. 2 J pages. 

Endorsed: — N° 8. Petition of Robert Hayne, praying the Inter- 
position of the Earl of Dartmouth for the Recovery of an Estate 
and the Effects of Rich d Salter Esq. of Trenton in New Jersey, 
which he alledges to be detained from him by a M r Cox of that 
Town, as Heir at Law (in right of his Wife, whom he states to 
be only Daughter of the said R d Salter) to the said Estate. 



United Presbyterian Churches of New York to 
Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 20. New York. — Address of the Ministers, Elders 
and Deacons. Signed John Rodgers, Moderator. 

Original. 5 J pages. 

Endorsed : — Presbyterian Churches of N. York. 

The Same to the Same. 

1773, October 20. New York. — Substance of the above Petition from 
the Ministers &c. of the United Presbyterian Churches of New York to 
Lord Dartmouth for a charter of incorporation. 

4| pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 23. London. — The report is finishing agreeable to 
the directions he has received. Has found it necessary to add to that 
report the 8 th chapter now enclosed. Is informed that his geometer 
Joseph Purcell has secretly taken copies of his surveys since his absence 
from America and entered the service of John Stuart Indian Super- 
intendent, a special friend of Governor Grant. One Bernard Romans 
acted in the same manner previously. Stuart's present appointment is 
entirely the effect of de Brahm's recommendation. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Chapter 8 th . Of the Indian Boundaries. 
Autograph. 3 J pages. 



Extract of a letter from Boston. 

1773, October 28.— Addressed to J. T. Esq. 
2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — C — 17. Ext. of a Letter from Boston to J. T. 
Esq* 28 Oct*" 1773. (Thoughts on the Means of restoring Peace 
to the Colonies.) 



179 

Charles Garth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, October 30. Devizes. — Thinks it necessary his Lordship 
should see the continued resolution in South Carolina not to pass any 
Government bill while the instruction of April 1770 is in existence. A 
continuance of this instruction will cause heated dissensions between the 
Council and Assembly and increase the many evils the province already 
labours under. 

Autograph letter signed, 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— N° 5. Ch. Garth Esq* Oct' 30, 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

South Carolina Minutes of Council. 

1773, August 17, 19 and 20. — Contained in a Newspaper cutting. 
Begins, M Ordered. That a Committee of the following Gentle- 
men be appointed, to inquire into the present State of the Public 
Treasury." Report submitted and resolutions thereon. 

William Kelly to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, October 30. Worcester. — As he is engaged in a contested 
election for this city and must strain every nerve, desires permission to 
print the letter he addressed to his Lordship on the importation of corn 
from America. His reason is solely to confirm the favourable sentiments 
as to his commercial knowledge, and the fact of his being in communi- 
cation with Lord Dartmouth would have a good effect* 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed:— W. Kelly Esq* 30 Oct r 1773. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [about October 1773]. Answers to questions from the Secretary 
of State relative to the condition of the colony of which he is Governor — 
its extent, boundaries, natural features, harbours, constitution, trade .. 
inhabitants, and expenses; with a paper marked, Valuation 1761. 

Copy. 15^ pp. in two columns. [The original is in the Public 
Record Office, America and West Indies, 174, fo. 791.] 

Endorsed : — America. 



Sagadahook. 

1773, October. — A list of the number of Inhabitants settled on lands 
eastward of the Sagadahook River to the River St. Croix. Total number 
of families 2,438. 

Original. 1 page. 

Endorsed ; — List of the N° of Inhabitants in territ of Sagadahook. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Mr. Loup. 

1773, November 3. — Concerning a letter forwarded by him from the 
Earl of Dartmouth to which no answer has been received. Remarks 

m 2 



180 

upon his Lordship's generosity with regard to the grant he has made. 
Asks whether the plan of the Society is to take place or is dropt. 
Copy signed, § page. 

Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, November 4. New Bern, North Carolina. — Private. Acquaints 
him of the retraction by M r Burg win of certain charges he had made 
against him (Martin) ; he, on his part, now desires to withdraw any 
misrepresentations in Burgwin's disfavour. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Gov r Martin 4 Nov r 1773. Private. 

Montfort Browne to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1773, November 5. Greenwich. — To explain his disagreeable 
situation during his command at West Florida from the cruel mis- 
representations made against him would take up too much time, 
therefore only goes into the question of the great injuries his estates 
have suffered from their being totally dismembered by the sale of his 
negroes to discharge the debts of Government. Desires an appoint- 
ment. Dominica is the object of his wishes. 

Autograph letter signed. 2| pages. 

Endorsed : — Mont d Browne Esq r 4 Nov r 1773. 

Governor Sir Francis Bernard to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, November 6. Aylesbury. — Refers to an application he made 
nine months ago in favour of his two sons for the appointment of the 
naval office at Boston. His own services. Bequests that this office 
may be extended to make provision for more than one of his sons. 

Letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— S r Fr. Bernard 6 Nov. 1773. 

J. Temple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, November 8. Great George Street. — Transmits copies of 
letters on American affairs which passed between himself when in America 
and the late M r Whately. He is the first person in England this cor- 
respondence has been shown to except some short extracts which relate 
to particular matters. Sends them from a desire to throw every light on 
the affairs of the colonies. These letters will in part disclose the trouble 
and illtreatment he (Temple) met with. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Temple 8 Nov r 1773. 

Commodore Samuel Hood to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1773, November 9. Catherington by Petersfield. — Renews his 
application that his Lordship will recommend him to Lord North for a 
similar mark of public favour to that bestowed on M r Gambier his 
successor in die American command. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Com. Hood 9 Nov r 1773. 



181 

James Loup to William Gerard de Brahm. 

1773. November 11. Basinghall Street. — The intended Society for 
Cape Florida and the projects in connection therewith have ended in 
smoke. Acknowledges the condescension shown by the Earl of Dart- 
mouth. Reasons for the affair terminating in this way. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal, ?>\ quarto pages. 



Captain Williamos to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, November 18. Thursday Evening, St. James's Place.— Would 
like to be appointed to the office named in the enclosure but should 
such an office appear inadmissible offers himself as a candidate to 
succeed M r Shuckburgh as Secretary to the Indian affairs under Sir 
William Johnson. 

Autograph, third person. 1 page. 
Endorsed : — Cap. Williamos 18 Nov r 1773. 

Enclosure : — 

A paper showing the advisability of establishing an office for 
inspecting the sale of lands in JVo?'th America. " The 
Spirit of emigration to North America being now so pre- 
vailing in Europe the Immense tracts of land which the Crown 
possesses in that Continent are of course of the greatest 
importance, and therefore every step ought to be taken to 
regulate every thing relative to them. 
Autograph. 5 pages. 



Robert Tomlinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, November 23. " Resolution " at Portsmouth. — Desiring to be 
appointed first Lieut, of the Admiral's Ship upon the N° American 
Station. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 



John Jones to Mr. Padmore. 

1773, November 24. Denmark Court, No. 15, Strand, London.— On 
the subject of the enclosures. 

Autograph letter signed. ^ page. 

Endorsed : — pr Lt. W m Campbell. 

Enclosures : — 

Memorandum relative to his claim to certain lands in South 
Carolina. 

Original. 1 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — South Carolina. 

Extract from the will of Lewis Jones of South Carolina, 
10 February 1743 with some " Suppositions " concerning the 
land therein mentioned. 



182 



Case of John Jones. 



Not dated. — Respecting lands bequeathed to him in South Carolina. 
Draft, If 'pages. 



Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, November 27. Boston, New England. — Upon the serious state 
of affairs in America. Endeavours of France to gain some advantage 
in the prevailing dispute. Urges the necessity of a speedy reconciliation. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 pages. 

Endorsed:— -M r Ward Boston Nov r 27 1773. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, November 29. States his connection with Governor Grant 
through the marriage of his daughter. Loss he has sustained by her 
death. Recommends his father-in-law John Row, who has been for 
many years Sheriff of Maryland, for the appointment of Provost 
Marshal of East Florida. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. 2 pages. 



Corbyn Morris to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, December 1. Storys Gate, Westminster. — Refers to a con- 
versation with Lord North on the subject of a new American commission. 
Proposes two new members and gives a list of the gentlemen who 
would then compose it. Remarks on the advantages which would be 
gained by its establishment. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— C. Morris Esq 1 ' 1 Dec 1773. 



Tea. Proceedings at Boston. 

1773, December 1. — Two copies of a printed paper headed " Boston " 
containing proceedings of the people of Boston and the neighbouring 
towns, 29 and 30 November, assembled for the purpose of consulting, 
advising and determining upon the most proper and effectual method to 
prevent the unlading, receiving or vending the " detestable tea " sent 
out by the East India Company. 

2 pages. [Copy of this was presented with other 4 papers to the 
Houses of Parliament on the 7th March 1774.] 



Tea. 

1773, received December 1. — "Sceevola" to the Commissioners 
appointed by the East India Company for the sale of tea, in America, 
letting forth the odium attached to the office held by them. 

Printed, 1 page. 

Endorsed: — N° 10. Address to the Commiss rs for sale of Tea 
in America N. York. R/ 1 Dec r 1773. 



183 

Tea. 

1773, after December 0. — Postscript to a letter from Boston dated 
Dec r ye 6 th . " Since dating the within, all the Tea which had arrived 
in the three vessels, Capts. Bruce, Hall and Coffin, has been utterly 
destroyed by a number of persons disguised like Indians, who broke 
open the Hatches, hoisted up the Chests, stove them, & threw them 
overboard " . . . . The owners and others concerned dared not 
accept the Admiral's protection ; their own lives, their families and their 
property must have been the forfeit. 

2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Boston. From an officer on 
board the Arthur. 

Case of Colonel George Mercer. 

1773, December 7. London. — Beginning " In 1754, The Govern- 
ment of Virginia raised a Regiment, to prevent the encroachments of 
the French." His services in the army and later as stamp distributor. 

Printed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed : — Case of Colonel Mercer. 

The Reverend William Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, December 11. Jamaica Plain. — Disgust displayed by 
American merchants in London on account of the measures pursued by 
the East India Company with regard to the tea. Explains that their 
representations of the monopoly of that Company have been the means 
of rousing the opposition in America. The meetings etc. Temper of the 
people. His own endeavours to dissuade them from a rupture. How 
far they may have exceeded the bounds of moderation, after allowing for 
the manner in which they have been managed by interested persons at 
home and among themselves, as that Government may decline giving 
them relief or judge it necessary to adopt rough measures, is not for him 
to determine, but if any colony should be dealt with separately the rest 
would make it a common cause. Warns that from his observation they 
could oppose any British regiments set against them. The population 
is much greater than any returns show as the people do not wish their 
real numbers known. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed ;— Rev. M r Gordon 1773. 
Copy in his own hand of the foregoing. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, December 16. Queens Square, Westminster. — Religious 
••ntiments with reference to the enclosed essay. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Enclosure ;— 

1773, December 12. — "Essay upon the Apocalipsin on the time 
and times passed present and to come." 
Autograph. 4 pages . 



184 

B. Romans to Doctor Williamson. 

1773, December 20. — Concerning a proposed expedition by the 
Lakes or the Mississippi through the western parts of America to the 
.North Eastern parts of Asia and thence to Russia. (The beginning of 
the letter seems to be wanting.) 

Autograph signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Rec d 2 d Feb? 1774 from D r Williamson. 

House of Assembly of North Carolina. 

1773, December 21. — Resolutions to present an address to the 
King soliciting the withdrawal of the instruction relative to attachments 
Certified by Governor Martin 2 March 1774 with a large wax seal of 
the province attached by a blue ribbon. 

Copy from the Minutes, attested by Jas. Green. 2| pages. 

Tea. 

1773, December 27. — Printed paper headed "Philadelphia" con- 
taining an account of the transactions in this city with reference to the 
tea sent to America. 

1 page. [Another printed copy is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 202, fo. 35.] 

Thomas Danforth to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773, December 28. Boston. — Gives an account of the late very 
extraordinary occurrences with regard to the East India Company's 
tea. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Tho s Danforth Jun r . 2H Dec r 1773. Boston. 

Fire at Fort Georgk, New York. 

1773, December 29. — An Estimate of the loss of several pcrsors 
(servants of Governor Tryon) by the fire in the evening of 29 December. 
1 page. 

Endorsed : — Estimate of the Losses of the within nam'd Persons by 
the Fire in the Fort House the 29 Dec r 1773. Servants to Gov. 
Tryon In consideration whereof the Gov 1 " gave them £340 Sterling 

340 
170 

equal to £595 Currency of N. York. gs 

595 



John Pownall to Peter Michell. 

1773, December. Whitehall. — Desiring to know whether the East- 
|jndia Company has obtained licenses to export teas on their own 
account to North America. (This is within a wrapper bearing the 
following note in PownalPs hand : — " The inclosed Letter consequential 
of the Advices lately reced from America is submitted to your Lord- 
ship and shall be either sent or suppress'd as you think fit.") 

Letter signed. 1 page. 



185 

Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. 

1773, November and December.— Schedule of Papers touching the 
different town meetings in the various Provinces of America during these 
months. The list is arranged under the headings — Boston, New York, 
and Philadelphia. 

1 quarto page. 



Bank in America. 

N.D. [Qy. about 1773 or 1774.] — Plan for establishing a Bank in 
North America, beginning " Tho the Prohibition of Paper Currency 
in the several provinces of North America, has as yet taken place in 
few or none entirely, as the time their Bills have to run is not yet- 
expired, it has notwithstanding caused great distress." 

6 J pages. 

Endorsed : — C — 21 Plan for Establishing a Bank in North America. 



William Boll an, Agent for the Council of Massachusetts Bay, 

to the King. 

N.D. [1773.] — Petition. Remarks concerning the charter of the 
province. Endeavours to justify proceedings of the Council and desires 
to be heard in their further defence. 

Copy. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Bollans petition to the King in Council. Copy. 



[William Gerard de Brahm] to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N.D. [Qy. 1773.] — Paper headed Memorandum. Remarks on the 
mis-government of the Governor [Grant]. Persecution shown to those 
who refuse to submit to his requests and caprices. Injustice displayed 
in settlement of lands in the province. Impossibility of the country 
flourishing under the present Governor unless he reforms. 

In de Brahm 's hand. 4 jolio pages. 



The Earl of Buchan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773— 

Letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — E. of Buchan 1773. Intimating his Intention of 
visiting the Colonies, and offering Information. 



Cod Fishery. 

1773.— Paper endorsed " M r De Berdt on the Cod Fishery." 
1 ^ pages. 



John Calef to the King. 

N.D. [Qy. 1773.] — Memorial on behalf of William Eaton and 
o9 other settlers on Deer Island. Concerning the settlement made by 



186 

them on that Island lying on the eastward side of the entrance of Penobscot 
river which they desire may be granted to them and their heirs. 
Original signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Mem of John Calef Esq r Agent for W m Eaton & 
others. 



Notes for Letters to American Governors. 

N.D. [1773.] — Memorandum of Instructions to be given to 
General Haldimand, Governors Hutchinson, Tryon and Martin and 
the Commissionerg of the Customs. General Haldimand to be instructed 
that there is no intention to re-establish the Post at Crown Point. The 
garrison either to rejoin the corps to which it belongs, or be added to 
that of Ticonderoga. The 60th regiment. Hutchinson's private 
correspondence. Tryon to be ordered to return to England to place 
before His Majesty the state of his province. Instructions for Governor 
Martin concerning the Court Act., Commissioners of Customs are not 
to allow any packets to be opened addressed upon His Majesty's 
Service to the Secretary of State or his under Secretaries. 

In PownalVs hand. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — (In pencil) Gen. Haldimand 2. Gov r Tryon. Gov r 
Martin. Cust. House. R. Society. Rev d M r Vickers. 



John Gordon to the King. 

N.D. [1773.] — Memorial. Concerning a previous memorial pre- 
sented by him, relative to difficulties which have arisen in connection 
with his and others' claims to land in East Florida. Desires the King 
will direct an inquiry to be made into the merits of his case and the 
nature of such means as he may have to propose. 

H pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Gordon's Memor 1 to the K, in Council. 



Mary Hayne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N.D. [1773.] — Respecting the trouble she has experienced in 
procuring the will of her father M r Salter. 
Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M rs Hayne. 



Thomas Irving. 

N.D. [1773.] — A paper containing extracts of letters in favour of 
Thomas Irving Inspector General of Exports, from the Collector, 
Commissioners and Secretary of the Customs at Boston to the Treasury 
and the Board of Customs at home, to the effect that he has rendered 
essential service to the Government. 

2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Extracts concerns M r Irving. 



187 

William Knox. 

N.D. [Qy. 1773 or 1774.] — On the proposed mode of granting 
lands in America. A long essay containing comparison between the 
present mode and that intended to be adopted. 

In Knox's hand. 30§ pages. 

Lord Charles Greville Montagu to Lord Dartmouth. 

N.D. [1773.] — Pecuniary losses sustained by him in the execution 
of his appointment as Governor of South Carolina. Hopes his Lord- 
ship will represent his case to the King that he may be allowed the 
same salary which has lately been established for the Governors of New 
York and Boston. 

Original. 3 pages. 

Endorsed: — To the Earl of Dartmouth His Majesty's Principal 
Secretary of State for the Colonies and Plantations. 

The Memorial of Lord Charles G-reville Montagu Governor of 
South Carolina. 

New England. 

N.D. [Qy. 1773.] — A list of New England Grievances. "1. Acts 
of Parliament raising a revenue in America without our Consent. 
2. The Appropriation of it alarming. Salary to the Governor destroying 
the mutual Dependence between him & People, establish'd by the Charter. 
Creating undue Dependance of the Judges on the Crown. 3. Revenue 
Officers needlessly multiplied in the Colonies. Board of Comin rs an 
Innovation, embarrassing Trade, Fleets & Armies posted in the Province 
for no purpose but to protect them in their Oppressions. 4. Enormous 
Extension of Admiralty Powers an intolerable Grievance — depriving 
of Rights to Trial by Juries. 5. Act about Dockyards depriving of 
Trial by the Vicinage. 6. Instructions to seize our Fortress, Castle 
William. 7. Danger from the Powers of a Military Commander in 
chief. 8. Instruction to exempt Particular Persons from Taxes re- 
pugnant to Rights of the General Court. 9. Instruction forbidding 
Governor to assent to the Payment of the Agent." 

§ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — N° 14. New England Grievances. 

Paper Money in America. 

N.D. [Qy. about 1773 or 1774.] — Paper concerning the issuing of 
paper bills of credit in the Colonies. 
2 § pages. 

Endorsed : — C— 48. Paper Money in the Colonies. 

Pennsylvania. 

1773. — A Paper headed " The foreign Trade of Pensylvania," being 
Imports from and Exports to the Foreign European Ports. Extracted 
from the Collector's account. 

1 page. 

Endorsed .• — Pennsylvania Trade. 



188 

South Carolina. 

1773. — A paper endorsed "S.Carolina Proceedings concerning the 
Commitment of Powell the Printer. Aug st 1773." Quoting, amongst 
other items, the Protest of William Henry Drayton of 27 August and the 
Addresses of the Council of 1 1 September to the King and to Governor 
Bull. 

Draft. 54 pages. 



South Carolina. 

N.D. [to 1773]. — A sketch of the proceedings of the Assembly 
relative to the transmission of money from the Public Treasury to 
England. Endorsed 1769, but the proceedings appear to be carried up 
to the autumn of 1773. Gives details of the proceedings resulting 
from the correspondence between Lieutenant Governor Bull and Lord 
Hillsborough and Governor Montagu and the Earl of Dartmouth. 

Draft. 7 i § pages. 

Endorsed: — No. 1. Proceedings of the Assembly, relative to the 
Transmission of Money from the Public Treasury to England. 
1769. 



Edward Southouse to Lord Dartmouth. 

1773. — Memorial. Is by profession an attorney. 
2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Memorial of M r Edward Southouse praying for an 
office in N° America, or elsewhere. 1773. Ent d . 



Royalist Militia. 

1774, January 1. New York. — General Return of the Orange 
Regiment consisting of Two Battalions commanded by Colonel William 
Bayard. 

Original, signed William Bayard. f large page. 

Endorsed: — General Return of the 1 st & 2 d Battalion's of the Orange 
Regiment Commanded By Colonel William Bayard New York 
1 st Jan? 1774. 



Mrs. S. Osborn to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, January 1. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A — 31. M r9 Osborn 1 st Jan 1 ? 1774. Recommending 
M r John Fennel, whose Letter to her is inclosed. V. Cor. p. 20. 

Enclosure : — 

John Fennell to [Mrs. S. Osborn]. 

1773, August 12. — Requests her influence with the Earl of 
Dartmouth for an appointment in the proposed colony on the 
Ohio. 
Autoqraph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



189 

Fire at Fort George, New York. 

1774, January 3-14. — Various depositions of Governor Tryon's 
servants — Patty Hatch, housekeeper, Benjamin Johnson, Malcolm 
Mclsaac, Ann Patterson, Isaac De Peny, Elizabeth Dudley, Elizabeth 
Laycock, Mosas Mardon, and of Samuel Bayard, Merchant, as to the 
lire in Fort George, sworn before Whitehead Hicks, Mayor. 3, 4, 5, 
and 14 January 1774. 

Certified copies. 3^ pages. 

Endorsed : — January 1774 Depositions of the Governor's Servants 
touching the Fire in Fort George. As also the Deposition of 
Samuel Bayard Merchant. 



The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News 

Letter. 

1774, January 6, Thursday.— Number 3666. 
4 printed pages. 



Samuel Kemble to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, January 7. New York. 

Autograph letter signed. 1J quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— W Kemble N. York 7 Jan. 1774. Returning Thanks 
for his Appointment of Naval Officer of N. York. 



[Thomas Crowley] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, January 8. Grace Church Street. — Paper signed Amor 
Patriae, certified T[homas] C[rowley] and addressed to Lord Dartmouth. 
" Wisdom is better than Weapons of War, but one Sinner destroyeth 
much Good." Eccles. 9th ch. Ver. 18. An essay on American 
taxation. 

Copy. If pages. 

Endorsed : — Amor Patriaj 1774. Ex. 



William Gerard de Brahm. 

1774, January 10. — Memorandum. American lands to be cultivated, 
manufactures to be discouraged. Suggests the separation of the 
garrison and King's officers from the inhabitants in each province by 
the erection of forts large enough to hold 3,000 men besides the 
governor's residence. 

Autograph. With seal. 1^ pages. 

Endorsed : — Memorandum concerning America. 



Thomas De La Mayne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, January 10. New Bond Street. — Upon the subject of the 
enclosure. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — M r Delamaine Jan r ? 1775. 



190 

Enclosure : — 

Thoughts upon American Complaints. " The Complaints from 
America, like those of most other States, spring from the two 
great bases of political security, Property and Liberty." 
Original not signed. 5| pages. 

Endorsed : — Thoughts on America. 

The King's Speech to Parliament. 

[1774, January 13.] — Draft, with interlineations and corrections by 
Lord Dartmouth. Not dated — believed to be about this date. Regrets 
that peace between Russia and the Porte is not yet effected. Recom- 
mends to their attention the state of the gold coin. Has ordered the 
proper estimates for the current year to be laid before the House of 
Commons. Desires they will be careful to select for their immediate 
consideration such affairs as appear most important. 

3£ pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra* of Speech. 

Lieutenant Governor Elias Durnford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, January 15. London. — On the enclosures. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — Lieut. Gov 1 ' Durnford 15 Jan? 1774. 

Enclosures : — 

Cause of the high price of provisions in West Florida. 
Original. In Durnford } s hand. § page. 

Proposed Regidation for Fees in West Florida. 
Original. In Durnford 's hand. ^ page. 

Observations on the Indian Affairs of West Florida, 
Original. In Durnford y s hand. 1J pages. 

T. Webb to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, January 19. — Has seen Mr. Smith the Chief Justice of the 
Jerseys who tendered any services in his power in favour of Mr. Haynes. 
It rests with Mrs. Haynes to prove her father Richard Salter heir to 
Henry Salter. Acquaints of two vacancies in New 5Tork by the deaths 
of the naval officer and commissary general of provisions. Would be 
glad of the latter appointment. Flatters himself that his Lordship will 
not forget his long and faithful services. 

Letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— M r Webb N. Jersey. Jan7 19 1774. 



Thomas Hunt to the Reverend Mr. Madan. 

1774, January 22. No. 15, Bread Street. — Mr. and Mrs. Hayne 
desire their acknowledgements to Lord Dartmouth for his kindness in 



191 

writing to Judge Smith. As the efforts to obtain a copy of the late 
Richard Salter's will have proved ineffectual, they intreat his Lordship 
to write to the Governor of New York requesting him to obtain and 
transmit a copy of the will immediately. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal {broken). 1 quarto page. 

Sir Francis Bernard to John Pownall. 

1773 [should be 1774], January 23. Aylesbury. — Sends extract of a 
letter which comes from one who is firm in the interests of government. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — S r F. Bernard to J. Pownall Esq. Ex. 

Enclosure : — 

1773, December 16. — Extract of a letter from Boston. " The 
Temper of the People, and what has lately been said to be the 
disposition of Administration , lead some to think the Revenue 
Acts may be repealed and the American board of Commissioners 
be dissolved. You will hear more particularly than I can 
inform you, That the Tea in Bruce and Hall was this evening 
distroyed." The Governor is detested by one party while he 
is blamed by the other. Does not think the people will come to 
a general and open rebellion if the government should pursue 
coercive measures, but it may be feared when a firm union 
between the Colonies may be completed. 
1 quarto page. 

Samuel Wharton to Thomas Pitt. 

1774, January 25. Argyle Street. — Concerning the grant of land 
made to Mr. Walpole and his associates and the objections made to it 
by the Attorney and Solicitor General. 

Letter signed. 10^ pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Wh. to M r Pitt concerns Vandalia. 

William Bollan to the King. 

1774, January 26. — Petition. Showing that the harmony between 
Great Britain and the colonies has been disturbed by the King's 
ministers and that the Council of Massachusetts have endeavoured to 
preserve peace and good order although Governor Thomas Hutchinson 
while Lieutenant Governor wrote letters most unjustly censuring their 
conduct. Complains of the representations made against the Council 
by the Governor as also by Andrew Oliver Lieutenant Governor. 
Desires that copies of the Council's proceedings may be added to the 
other papers now before the Privy Council. 

Copy. 2 J pages. 

Endorsed: — Petition of M r Bollan, agent for the Council of the 
Massachu** 8 province, to his Majesty. Copy. Ex. 

Sir George Savile to Lord Dartmouth. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .•— S r G° Saville 28 Jan? 1774. relative to M r Green's 
Desire of being Secretary of N. Hampshire. 



192 

Hans Stanley to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, January 28. Privy Garden. — On behalf of Captain Pryce who 
has lately submitted a memorial of his services and of his pretensions to 
a grant of lands in America. 

Autograph letter signed. If pages. 

Endorsed: — H. Stanley Esq r 2 8 Jany 1774 recommending Capt. 
Pryce. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, January 29.— (Held at the Earl of Suffolk's.) Concerning 
American advices to be laid before the House of Lords. 
Draft. 1^ pages. 

Endorsed: — Minute 29 Jany 1774. Ex. 

Captain Henry Caldwell to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, January 29. London. — A report has prevailed for some days 
past that his Majesty intends raising a corps of his Canadian subjects. 
Offers his services on the occasion. Supposes there may be 1,000 men 
on his estates in Canada holding their lands under feudal tenure and 
liable to military service, who are tit to bear arms. His powers as a 
seigneur and his experience as a military officer are both at the disposal 
of Government. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— B— 21. Cap. Caldwell 29 Jany 1774. 

Lieutenant Colonel William Dalrymple to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, January 29- London. — The people of Boston are endeavouring 
to raise a sum equal to the value of the teas destroyed to refund the 
Company. There remains still some fear of the consequences of their 
late frantic behaviour. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— L* Col. Dalrymple 29 Jany 1774. 

John Malcolm to Governor Hutchinson and the House of 
Eepresentatives of Massachusetts Bay. 

[1774, January 30, certified]. — Memorial, giving an account of the 
outrage committed on him by the people of Boston and desiring relief 
and suitable redress. Not dated. With a certificate by Joseph 
Gardner J. P. 30 January 1774, followed by a Resolutton of both 
Houses of the Province 1 February relative to the memorial. 

Copy certified in London 16 June 1774. 2§ pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of Petition To the Governor and Representatives 
Massachusetts Bay N. England 1 st February 1774. J. Malcolm. 

Royalist Miltia. 

1774, January 31. — A list of the foot company of Flatbush in 
King's County whereof LefFert Martense is Captain, Johannes Ditmas 
Lieutenant and Jacob Snediker Ensign. 

Signed Leffert Martense. 1 page. 

Endorsed : — A List of the Foot Company of Flat Bush. 



193 

1774, January 31. — Return, addressed To his Excellency Governor 
Tryon, of the strength of the regiment of militia in West Chester 
County by James Van Cortlandt Colonel of the Regiment. 

Signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed : — Weschester Militia Col Ja s Van Cortlandt. 



"An Opinion" on American Affairs. 

1774, January. — Concerning the present disposition of the colonies 
and measures to be pursued in consequence. 
2 pages. 

Endorsed: — An Opinion. Jau r y 1774. 



American Trade. 

1774, January. — Britannicus. Thoughts on American trade. How 
to make the Colonies serviceable to the Mother Country. 
Original signed. If pages. 

Endorsed : — C. — 5. Britannicus Jan. 1774. Thoughts on American 
Affairs. Britannicus Jan? 1774. 



Tea. 

N.D. [1774, January.] — Paper headed "Case" beginning "The 
Advices received from Boston in letters from Governor Hutchinson, 
Admiral Montagu and the Commandant of the King's Troops at Castle 
William, and the Information taken here of Captain Scott lately arrived 
from thence, contain the following Facts" — (etc). With two Queries 
M on the foregoing Case " and Appendices A to I. 

Appendix A. — Governor Hutchinson to Earl of Dartmouth Extract 

4 November 1773. 
Enclosures : — 

Copy of an impersonal letter signed 0. C. and addressed to 

Thomas and Elisha Hutchinson [2 November']. 
Copy of a printed notification posted up in Boston 3 November. 
Benjamin Davis. Narrative of proceedings with regard to the 

tea [3 November]. 
Josiah Green. Narrative of proceedings [3 November]. 

Appendix B. — Governor Hutchinson to the Earl of Dartmouth 

November 1773. 
Enclosures : — 

Boston. ^Freeholders and] inhabitants Vote to request Thomas 

and Elisha Hutchinson to resign 5 November. 
Thomas Hutchinson Jun r for self and brother to John Hancock 

[4 November]. 
Richard Clark and others to John Hancock 4 November. 

Appendix C. — Governor Hutchinson to the Earl of Dartmouth 

15 November 1773. 
Appendix D. — Governor Hutchinson to the Earl of Dartmouth 
2 December 1773. 
y 82140. N 



194 

Enclosures : — 

Extract from Massachusetts Gazette 26 November. 
Massachusetts. Minutes of Council 19/29 November with a 
petition from Richard Clarke and others to the Governor and 
Council and a Certificate of Hutchinson. 
Proceedings of Boston inhabitants 29 and 30 November (headed 
1 December.) 

Appendix E. — Information of Capt. Scott taken 25 January 1774. 
Appendix F. — Rear-Adl. Montagu to Philip Stephens 8 December 1773. 
Appendix G-. — Governor Hutchinson to the Earl of Dartmouth 

15 December. 
Appendix H. — Governor Hutchinson to the Earl of Dartmouth 

17 December. 
Appendix I. — Rear-Adml. Montagu to Philip Stephens 17 December. 

82^ pages. 



The same " Case " and " Queries " but without the Appendices. 



Tea. 

N.D. [Qy. about 1774, January]. — Paper headed " Narrative " 
similar to the foregoing " Case " but giving also abstracts of letters 
from Major General Haldimand, from Philadelphia and the agents of 
the East India Company there, and from Governor Bull of South 
Carolina. 

Draft. 30 \ pages. 

Endorsed : — Narrative. 



John Hurst to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 1. Bow Churchyard.— .Transmitting enclosure. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Concerns American Lands M r Hurst. 

Enclosure : — 

Henry Remsen to John Hurst. 

1773, October 25. New York. — Per the "London" Captain 
Chambers. Concerning a tract of land which he has discovered 
in New York. Recommends it to the Earl of Dartmouth for 
one of his sons. Gives boundaries and description. 
Signed copy. 2 pages. 



John Lane to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, February 2. Nicholas Lane. — Desires Mr. Woodbury Langdon 
may be appointed to a vacancy in the Council of New Hampshire 
occasioned by the death of Mr. Daniel Pierce. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



195 

Returns of Rovalist Militia. 

1774, February 2. — A list of the Militia company of foot in the 
township of Flatlands in King's County signed by Captain Jeremiah 
Vander Biit. 

H pages. 

Endorsed: — Col Lots Return of the Militia in King's County. 

1774, February 2. — "A list Or Roole of the Names of the Troupers 
in King's County under the command of Captain Rem Couwenhoven/' 
signed by him. 

1 page. 

Endorsed: — The Return of the Troop in King's County. 

1774, February 2. — A list of the company of militia of the township 
of New Streight under the command of Jacques Denyse. 
Signed. 1 page. 

1774, February 3. — A list of the militia of Gravesend, whereof Isaac 
Denyse is Captain, signed by him. 
1 page. 

1774, February 4. — A list of the militia &c. of the north side of the 
Rode of the township of Brookland under the command of Captain 
Abraham Remson. 

Signed. 1 page. 

1774, February 4. — A list of the men's names in the western division 
of the township of Brooklands in King's County, signed by Captain 
Farnandus Suydam. 

1 quarto page. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, February 4. — (At Lord Rochford's office.) In Lord Dartmouth's 
hand. To recommend to the King that the Governor remove to some 
place in the province least likely to be influenced by Boston. The 
Attorney and Solicitor General to consider whether the late proceedings 
amount to high treason. 

Rough draft. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Minute 4 Feb? 1774. 

William Bollan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 5. Co vent Garden. — Concerning the laying of his 
petition before the King and his desire to be heard on behalf of the 
Council he represents. 

Letter signed. With seal {broken). 2 quarto pages. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, February 5. — (At the Earl of Sandwich's.) In Lord Dartmouth's 
hand. Measures to be pursued in case the Attorney and Solicitor 

n 2 



196 

General are of opinion that there is sufficient ground to institute a 
criminal proceeding against any of the persons concerned in the late 
outrages committed in Boston. 

1|- quarto -pages. 

Endorsed: — Minute 5 Feb? 1774. 

" Amor Patriae " [Thomas Crowley] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 5. Grace Church Street. — The advisability of 
sending ships of war to procure justice by capturing vessels bound 
from the American ports to foreign European ports and the West Indies, 
rather than depending wholly on military inland measures. 

Original. § quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Amor Patriae 1774. 

Enclosure : — 

Letter to the .Printer of the Public Ledger signed " Amor 
Patrice" On the important crisis now pending between England 
and America. 

Newspaper cutting. ^ column. 

\ to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 5. North America. — Thoughts upon the American 
colonies. Taxation. Fears if some conciliatory measures are not 
adopted, hostile aversions and animosities will produce mutual distress. 

Autograph. 21^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Anonimous N". America 5 Feb? 1774. E/ 11 July Ex. 

Returns of Royalist Militia. 

1774, February 7. — A list of the militia company of foot of Bushwick 
in King's County, signed by Captain Petrus Lott. 
\\ pages. 

1774, February 8. — A list of the names of the officers belonging to 
the regiment of King's County who are not included in the several rolls 
of the respective companies. 

Original. \ quarto page. 

A return of the militia in Richmond County, with a list of persons 
recommended by Christopher Billopps to Governor Tryon, dated 
8 February 1774. The commissions dated 25 February. 

2 pages. 

Endorsed : — Return of Col. ChristoperBillops Regiment in Richmond 
County. 

Colonel William Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1774, February 10. London. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Col. Dalrymple 10 Feb. 1774 desiring Employment in 
the Measures with America. 



197 

The New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chroniolk. 

1774, February 11. — Containing, amongst other items, speeches of 
Gov. Wentworth of 12 and 14 January and address of the Assembly on 
the 21 st . 

No. 903. 2 printed pages. 

Endorsed (on a wrapper) : — Case of M r Livius. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to John Thornton. 

1774, February 12. — When he writes to Mr. Gordon, will he desire 
him, if he has any influence among the leading persons in the province, 
to set before them how fatally and effectually they have now shut the 
door against all possibility of present relief for any of the things they 
complain of, and how utterly vain it must be to expect that Parliament 
will ever give it them till there appears to be a change in their temper 
and conduct. Would be thought as mad as they if he were to say a 
word of repealing the tea duty now. . . . Hopes yet to see it done. 
Had they made no opposition to the E. India Company's teas it might 
have been this session. ... If it is meant to drive this country to 
extremities, there is an end of all schemes and plaus of reconciliation. 

Copy. Last few lines in Lord Dartmouth's hand. 2\ quarto 
pages. 

Endorsed .-—Copy to J. Thornton Esq r 12 Feb. 1774. On M r Gordon's 
Letter, and Boston Riots. 



Lord North to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, February 13. Downing Street. — Relieves that a letter from 
the Admiralty to M r Montagu will be requisite that he may know the 
conduct he ought to hold with respect to ships attempting to enter the 
harbour of Boston. Has sent a short sketch of a letter which contains 
his idea of the order proper to be sent to the Treasury. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d North Feb? 13 1774 relative to the Boston Bill &c. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 14, at Mr. Roberts, Queen Street, Westminster. — The 
vessels, boats, and instruments he requires are for the King's and not for 
his own service and will remain the King's property for ever. What he 
requires for himself is an honest subsistence so that he with his family 
may not burden others. Refers to the representations he has made of 
his sufferings. Desires that justice may be done to his demands. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 



Royalist Militia. 

1774, February 15. — Return of the Southern regiment of militia in 
the County of Cumberland within the Province of New York, signed 
by Colonel Wells. The commissions issued 15 March 1774. 

1 page. 

Endorsed : — Return of Col Wells Regeim* Cumberland County. 



198 

Corbyn Morris to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February 15. Board Room, Custom House. — Mr. Beaumont's 
case with regard to the tobacco seized from him stands in a very 
unfavourable light. In consequence of the enclosed report and the 
solicitor's opinion thereon the Board have ordered the tobacco to be 
proscribed. 

Autograph, third person. — 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed ;— Corbyn Morris Esq r 15 Feb? 1774. M r Beaumont's 
Case. 

Enclosure : — 

H. Stone and W. Spence to [the Board of Customs]. 

1774, February 5. — Report. Seizure made by them of tobacco in 
possession of Mr. Beaumont cf Rosemary High Street or Lane, 
some of which is from Virginia and Maryland. At the end 
is this note. — 12^ February 1774 To the Solicitor with the 
former papers E. M. From the Officers report, The goods 
appear liable to Seizure, J. Hedges, for Mr Medcalfe, \2 th ' 
Feb. 1114:. W h Febv. Prosecute. E. H. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, February 16. — (At Lord Rochford's.) In Lord Dartmouth's 
hand. Decision concerning the information lately received from 
Boston touching the disorders there. Agreed that two guard ships be 
added to the squadron under the command of Admiral Montagu at 
Boston. 

1J quarto pages. 

Endorsed .—Minute 16 Feb? 1774. 



1774, February 19. — Heads, apparently for the following Cabinet 
Minute. In Lord Dartmouth's hand. 
1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Heads for a minute 19 Feb^ 1774. 



Cabinet Minute. 

[1774], February 19. — (At Lord Dartmouth's.) In John Pownall's 
hand. In case a warrant is issued to arrest persons guilty of treason at 
Boston to recommend the King to send out a person conversant in the 
law to assist in its execution. Advices received from America, with the 
proceedings of the Privy Council thereupon to be laid before the Houses 
of Parliament. Permission to be gained to bring in the Boston Port 
Bill and a bill to alter the constitution of Massachusetts Bay. 

2§ quarto pages. 

Royalist Militia. 

1774, February 19. — A muster roll of the regiment on the north side 
of the Highlands in Orange County. 
Not signed. 1 page. 
Endorsed: — Return of Col Tusten's Regiment in Orange County. 



199 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to the House of 
Representatives. 

1774, February 22. Boston. — Message dated Council Chamber 
22 February 1774. Is headed Boston, Thursday, 24 February 1774. 
Copy. 4 pages. 

Royalist Militia. 

1774, February 24. Windsor. — Return of the Second Regiment of 
Militia in the County of Cumberland. Commanded by Colonel Nathan 
Stone. Commissions issued 19 March 1774. 

Original signed. ] page. 

Thomas Bridgen Atwood to the Earl of Rochford. 

1774, February 28. New York. — Recommends a former inhabitant 
of Bungay, Suffolk, who is in reduced circumstances. A small post in 
the Customs, in the post office, or in the land office, in New York, 
Boston, Quebec, Montreal or Philadelphia, of only £50 salary, would 
supply all his wants. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— W Atwood to L d Rochford. N. York. 28 Feb? 1774, 
recommending M r Brown. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, February 28. — With memorandum of a previous minute, 
undated, on the same business. In Lord Dartmouth's hand. As the 
charge of high treason cannot be maintained against any individuals on 
the ground of the depositions taken at the Council Board on the 19th 
instant, agreed that the depositions with the American advices be laid 
before Parliament on Monday next. To address the King with 
assurances of support. Boston Port Bill to be brought in and a bill 
for supporting the declaratory act of the 6th of this reign. 

2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .-—Minute 28 Feb? 1774. 

Boston. 

1774, February. — Remarks of a Merchant who makes an annual 
progress through the colonies on the continent of North America 
upon the character of the people at Boston. They are not only the 
worst subjects but the most truly immoral men of any he has had 
to deal with, unfair in trade, etc. If large and loud professions of 
the Gospel be an exact criterion of vital religion they are the best 
people on earth but if meekness, gentleness and patience constitute any 
part, those qualities are not found there. If they could maintain a 
state of independence they would soon be at war amongst themselves. 

2£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A Merchant's Remarks upon the People of Boston. 
R/ Feb. 1774. 

[ ] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, February. Letter not signed. — The importance of removing 
Mess" Hutchinson and Oliver. " The fairest opportunity is now 



200 

offer'd for Government perfectly consistent with its Dignity, to restore 

the American System to its good old-Establishment." " All 

they want is to be restored to the State they were in, before the 
unhappy period of the late M r George Grenvi lie's administration ; & 
let the glorious successes of the late War tell, whether that is not a 
desirable one, both for the Mother Country and the Colonies." 
Original. 3£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Anonymous Feb^ 1774. Redress of Amer. Complaints. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, March 1. — In Lord Dartmouth's hand. With a memorandum 
in PownalFs hand dated from the Secretary's Office 4 o'clock concerning 
the opinion of the Attorney General on a certain case. Resolutions as 
to alterations in the manner of appointing justices of the peace in 
Massachusetts Bay and in the constitution of the Province. 

§ quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Minute 1 March 1774. 

Corbyn Morris to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 1. Princes Street. — Submits a plan for an American 
representation. 

Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, March 1. Caroline Park. — Explains that Dr. Ferguson, the 
present Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University there, having 
been appointed travelling tutor to Lord Chesterfield's heir, and being 
unwilling to part with his chair has wished for a year's leave of 
absence. The magistrates are not willing to grant this. Dr. Beattie 
stands well with them but he has made many enemies by his attack on 
Hume. Is urging his nomination. Sends an essay on emigration 
written by a Highlander. The Episcopal Church is nearly finished; 
subscriptions are failing. As the Commander in Chief in Scotland is 
generally an Englishman and no provision made for the exercise of his 
religion suggests that with £200 a pew could be bought in perpetuity 
and furnished decently for his use. 

Autograph letter signed. 2.J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — S r Adolphus Oughton 1 st March 1774, on D r Ferguson, 
D r Beattie, episcopal Church, &c. 

Note. — Dr. Adam Ferguson appears later in the historj of the America nwar as 
secretary to the Commissioners — Lord Carlisle, William Eden and Governor 
Johnstone, who in 1778 were sent to America to restore peace. 

Minute of Council. New York. 

1774 March 2. Wednesday. — Accompanied by copy of a Petition 
of the Inhabitants of Spencer Town Albany County to Governor 
Tryon. 

Copy. Certified Gtv. Banyar. lj and 2 pages respectively. 

Endorsed: — 9/0 Paid for this Minutes Council. 2 ud Coppy. Also, 
Extract of Minnets of Counsel of the Deseption line. New York. 
3 d . 



201 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 3. Great Queen Street, Westminster. — Captain Atkins 
will be obliged if his Lordship will recommend him to Lord Sandwich 
for the command of the sloop ordered for the service of the General 
Survey. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

List of the Sloops of War at present not in Commission. 
Autograph of De Brahm. \ page. 



Count Bruhl to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, March 4. G. George Street. — John Augustus Ernst has a 
grant of 20,000 acres in East Florida dated May 13 1767 which he is 
desirous of having located. Jean Andre de Luc, a citizen of Geneva, is 
the other gentleman mentioned. 

Autograph, third person. \ % quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Count Bruhl 4 March 1774 recommending M r Ernst 
& M r de Luc. 



The Earl of Suffolk to Lord [Dartmouth]. 

1774, March 5. 30 minutes past 8 a.m. Duke Street, Westminster. 
— Will Lord Dartmouth send him the American papers. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



Lord Chancellor Apsley to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1774, March 6.] Sunday evening. — His opinion of the different 
bills being discussed in Parliament concerning Boston. States measures 
he considers necessary to be pursued towards the ringleaders in Boston 
as the past palliative ones have brought on the present situation. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d Chancellor 6 March 1774 on Boston Affairs. 



The King to Parliament. 

N.D. [1774, March 7, about.] — Draft of a Royal Message to the 
Houses of Parliament. Desiring that they will take into consideration 
the state of affairs in Boston and the best measures to be pursued. 

l^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra* of Message original D*. 

Endorsed (on a wrapper^. Dra* of Motion in the House of Lords^ 
and House of Commons. 



Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 7. Augustine. — Private Letter. No. 1. In his passage 
a gale of wind took them off the coast of Portugal. Was unable to 



202 

touch at Madeira. Sends copies of a letter from Lord Barrington and 
his answer relative to a charge for the garrison hospital at St. Augustine. 
Hopes his answer to Lord Barrington will meet with his Lordship's 
approbation. Is concerned to find the principal inhabitants of this 
place divided into parties. Is afraid some oppressions have been 
practised by the attornies. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed :— Gov r Tonyn 7 M ch 1774. Private. 

Enclosures : — 

Lord Barrington to Governor Patrick Tonyn. 

1773, November 3. War Office. — Desires the charges of 
Mr. Catherwood, Surgeon to the Garrison of St. Augustine, be 
defrayed and placed to his {Gov. Tonyn 1 s) contingent account. 

Copy. 1 page. 

Governor Pateick Tonyn to Lord Viscount Barrington. 

1774, March 7. Augustine. — Arrived at this place on the 1st 
instant. In the course of business Mr. Cathenvood's disburse- 
ments shall be examined. A specific sum, is allowed for the 
contingent expenses of the civil government of this province, so 
that his Lordship can judge with what fitness he can charge a 
military hospital's contingent expenses to the civil contingencies. 

Copy. 2 pages. 

Sir Jeffery Amherst to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 9, Wednesday. Whitehall. — Transmitting the enclosed. 
Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — S r Jeffery Amherst 9 March 1774 Consum. of Tea in 
America. 

Enclosure : — 

Extract of a letter from a friend in America. Concerning the 
importation of English and Dutch teas in America 
3 quarto pages. 

Cabinet Minute. 

1774, March 10, Thursday.— (At Lord Eochford's ofiice.) In Lord 
Dartmouth's hand. Concerning the Bills for removing the port and seat 
of Government in Massachusetts Bay and for Indemnification. 

J quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Minute 10 March 1774. 



Sir James Adolphus Oughton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 10. Caroline Park. — Reasons given by Dr. Beattie for 
declining the moral philosophy chair. Recommends Lord Dalhousie 
for Parliament. Adjutant General Colonel Skene is now in Half Moon 



203 

Street, Piccadilly. Canvassing for the general election is almost the 
sole object of attention in this country for which purpose an immense 
number of occasional votes have been made. Fate of the linen bill is 
waited for with great anxiety. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— & Adol. Oughton 10 March 1774. D r Beattie, L d Dal- 
housie, &c. 



Mr. Abercromby to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 12.— At Mr. Kussell's Oxenden Street. Sends the 
enclosed note on account of seeing his Lordship abused in the Daily 
Ledger for laying the American papers before the House of Lords in the 
first instance. 

Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — M r Abercrombie 12 March 1774. On presenting 
American Bills, in the first Instance, to the House of Lords. 

Enclosure: — 

Note of a Plantation Case in the House of Lords of 12 March 
1705. 



CORBYN TIORRIS to LORD DARTMOUTH. 

1774, March 13. — Suggesting the use of the enclosed form. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — C. Morris Esq r . 13 March 1774. American Tests. 

Enclosure : — 

Form of declaration to be made by an American magistrate before 
admission into office. 

In M orris's hand. \ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Declaration of an American Magistrate. 



Benjamin Barons to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 16. Acton, Middlesex. — Kemarks on the situation of 
affairs since the passing of the Stamp Act. Offers his sentiments upon 
the natural disposition and political sentiments of the Americans. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Barons 16 March 1774. On American Affairs. 



Thomas Knox Gordon to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, March 16. Charlestown, South Carolina. — Without presuming, 
he would like to suggest that the son of the late naval officer of Georgia 
might be appointed in his place. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Gordon Ch. Jus. of S. Carolina March 16 1774 rec* 
the son of the late naval officer of Georgia. 



204 

Lord North to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 17. — Settled the Bill yesterday evening. Did not 
adopt the Atty. General's plan. The Bill does not differ in matter from 
the old one but is extremely altered in form. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .-— L d North 17 March 1774. On the Boston Bill. 



John Williams to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 17. — There are but two other harbours besides that 
of Boston in Massachusetts which are in any way convenient for 
shipping, namely, one at Casco Bay, and the other at Plimouth. 
If proceedings in the Massachusetts Government should occasion 
their charter to be vacated, submits that it would be equally just to 
inflict a like punishment on Rhode Island. Apprehends in this case 
that it would tend to promote the intended ends if Rhode Island 
and that part of Massachusetts lying west of New Hampshire were 
incorporated into one government and Maine annexed to New Hamp- 
shire. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Williams 18 March 1774. Port of Salem &c. 

Enclosure : — 

Paper endorsed — Extract from M r TVilliams's Report of the Port 
of Salem. 
2 pages. 

William Bradley to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 19. 

Letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed : — W m Bradley Plan for a Coinage for America recom d by 
M r Ward. 

Enclosure : — 

A scheme proposed for raising the sum of four millions of specie 
to be coined into a particular coin for the use of America, with 
tables showing how it may be done. 
Original. 8 pages. 



John Willday to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 19. [Athe]rstone near Coventry. — Writes from a 
desire of rendering some service to both countries. Opines it would be 
much better to give up the right of taxing America, to make requisitions 
to their Assemblies for such aids as were wanting, and to give them 
seats in Parliament to enable them to assist in making laws for the 
good of the whole empire. The American members to have no vote 
for taxing Great Britain. 

Autograph letter signed. l\ pages. 

Endorsed: — John Willday Atherston 19 March conc& America. 
(And, in pencil) S r F. Bernard. M r Hutchinson. 



205 

The Earl of Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 20. Williamsburg. — Private. Hoping that his conduct 
has appeared to His Majesty in such a light that he may ask for his 
re-election as one of the sixteen peers. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, March 21. Boston. — Receipt of letter No. 14. Remarks as 
to using military aid in riots. The Chief Justice. Desire of the House 
to be informed of the state of the province powder and their pro- 
ceedings on this point. Judges' salaries. Measures projecting in 
opposition to the establishment of the Post Office in America, the 
proposals comiug from as far southward as the Committees of Pennsyl- 
vania and Maryland to the Committees of this province. The messenger 
who came with proposals to this province is gone forward to New 
Hampshire. 

Copy. 5J pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 175, fo. 315. Copies were 
presented to Parliament, amongst other American papers, on the 17th 
May.] 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Gov r Hutchinson to the Earl of 
Dartmouth, dated Boston, 21 st March, 1774. 



Royalist Militia. 

1774, March 21. — A. return of Colonel John Peters' regiment in 
Gloucester County and Province of New York. 
Original signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — A Return of the Gloucester Militia by Col Peters. 

1774, March 21. Johnson Hall. — Return of the Militia both Horse 
and Foot of the Northern District of the Province of New York under 
the command of Sir William Johnson. 

Original signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — To His Excels Gov r Tryon, Return of the Militia of 
the Northern District of the Province of New York. March 21st 
1774. This Return serves only for Ulster, Albany, Tryon, and 
Charlotte County, of which no return has been made to His 
Excellency Gov r Tryon by the Several Colonels. Ex. 



The Reverend Thomas Rankin to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, March 30. New York. — On the state of religion in America. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Petition to the King. 

[1774, March 31.] — Petition of natives of America to the King to 
suspend his Royal signature to the Boston Port Bill, Not signed nor 



206 

dated but according to Force's American Archives Fourth Series Vol. I, 
col. 61, it was presented to the King 31 March 1774 and was signed 
by William Lee, Dr. Franklin, John Ellis, Jonathan Williams and 
others. 

\^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Petition of natives of America, ag st the Bill for removing 
the Port of Boston, 



Boston Port Bill. 

N.D. [1774, March 31, passed].— Two Drafts of the Boston Port Bill 
and of Clauses A and B. 



Peter Livius. 

N.D. [1774, March 31, about]. — Details of the career of Peter Livius 
of New Hampshire, with question and observations in reply giving 
extracts from Acts relating to the right of an alien to fill a place of 
trust in America. 

2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Case of M r Livius. 



1774, March 31. Lincoln's Inn Fields. — Opinion of Samuel Wegg on 
the foregoing case — as to the right of holding office in the colonies with 
his cosmopolitan nationality. 

In two handwritings ; signed Samuel Wegg. 1 page. 



Orders of the Lords Committees. 

1774, March 31. — American papers to be laid before Committee at 
their next meeting. 
1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Orders of the Lords Committees. In Clerk of Committee's 
Letter to J.P. 2 April. 



Boston. 

N.D. [1774, March]. — Two queries concerning the port of Boston 
and the removal of the Custom House. 
Not signed. \ quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Queries. 

Colonel Petrus Ten Broeck to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, April 1. Rhynobeck. — Transmitting enclosures. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — A Return of Col Ten Brocks Regim* in Dutchess 
County. 

Enclosures : — 

Returns of his regiment. Twelve papers. 



207 

Governor Loed William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 2. New Man Street. — Having been appointed Governor 
of South Carolina and finding it impracticable to carry on his Majesty's 
service with any satisfaction while the affairs of the colony are in such 
a state of disorder and confusion, he' gives the result of the inquiry he 
has made into them. Represents the necessity of withdrawing an 
instruction given in April 1770 which the colony will not submit to. 

Letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— L d W. Campbell. 2 April 1774. 

Enclosure : — 

1771, February 28. — Henry Peronneau, joint public treasurer with 
Benjamin Dart, Bond and securities for £20,000 for the due 
execution of the office. 
Copy. 2 pages. 

The Earl of Dunmore to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, April 2. W[illiams]burg. — Private. In behalf of Capt. Foy. 
Letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Isaac Edwards to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, April 3. Newbern. — In justification of a representation made 
against him that he took the lead in the Assembly in opposition to every 
measure and proposition of the Government. 

Autograph letter signed. 9| pages. 

Endorsed : — Isaac Edwards to Gov r Tryon. 

Again Endorsed: — Isaac Edwards to Gov r Tryon Newbern 3 d Apl 
1774. Rec d June 1774. Ans. 



Matthew Brickdale to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 4. Clifton near Bristol. — Arrival of the " John " from 
Casco Bay. The captain reports Boston quiet and that contrition 
seemed to have followed violence. Governor Hutchinson was to have 
come over in this vessel but preparations were countermanded on 
account of Lieut.-Governor Oliver's indisposition. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Brickdale 4 April 1774 relative to the State of 
Things at Boston on the 1 st of March, 1774. 

Mrs. Maria Cowper to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, April 4. Park Street. — Desiring one year's leave of absence 
for Major Hore who was appointed last year Commissary of Musters 
and Judge Advocate in America. 

Autograph letter signed. 1J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M rs Cowper, Park Street, 4 th April, 1774, recommending 
Major Hore. 



208 



New York. 



Docquet of Lands granted by His Excelly. Win. Tryon Esqr. Capt. 
Genl. and Govr. in Chief of the Province of New York. Pursuant to 
His Majesty's Proclamation of the7 0ctr. 1763, from the 7th September 
1771 to the 5th April 1774. 

6f pages. 



Inhabitants of New Concord to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 6. New York. — Petition signed by James Savage, 
Agent. Concerning the settlement made by them of New Concord. 
Entreat that his Lordship will not permit their land to become the 
property of others and that he will procure instructions to the Governor 
to grant them the land or such part thereof, sufficient to secure them 
from penury and wretchedness. 

2 pages. 

Endorsed: — Petition of the Inhabitants of New Concord N. York. 



New Y r ORK. 

A docquet of lands granted by Governor William Tryon (exclusive of 
military grants) from 5 September 1771 to 6 April 1774. 
Original signed. 2\ pages. 



Cabinet Minute. 

1774, April 7. — (At Lord Rochford's office.) In Lord Dartmouth's 
hand. Consideration of the questions asked by General Gage with 
reference to his authority to call out the King's troops to assist in 
quelling disturbances without ihe advice of the Council of Massachusetts 
Bay. 

2\ pages. 

Endorsed:— Minute 7 April 1774. N. G.P. A. E. 



Not dated. Paper headed u Questions " — probably those referred to 
in the foregoing Minute. If any violences should be committed, or 
opposition given to the execution of the Act of Parliament, (etc.) can 
General Gage in such cases, call in the military to his assistance 
without the advice and consent of the Council ; and what steps should 
he take if he and his troops should be exposed to prosecution ? 

J folio page. 



Order of the House of Lords. 

r 1774, April 7. House of Lords. — Lord Dartmouth to lay before the 
Lords Committee extracts of papers relative to proceedings at Boston, 
which have been received at his office. 

Signed by their Lordship's command, Matt w Rob* Arnott. 1 quarto 
page. 

Endorsed : — Order of House of Lords. April 7 th 1 774. 



209 

Colonel William Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, April 8. London. — Submits the expediency of securing Castle 
William at Boston to the Government. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

1774, April 9. — The King's approval of his conduct. State of his 
province. 

Draft in Dartmouth's hand. 4 J- pages. 

Endorsed; — Draft to Grov r Hutchinson 9 April 1774. Private. 

A copy follows marked " addressed by Lord Dartmouth to Gov r 
Hutchinson immediately before his sailing for England in 
1774. A." 



[Order of the House of Lords.] 

N. D. [Qy. 1774, April 14.]— In William Knox's hand. That there 
be laid before the House copies or extracts of all letters and papers which 
have been received by His Majesty's Secretaries of State from the 
Governor, Lieutenant Governor or other officers in Massachusetts Bay 
containing advices of any proceedings in opposition to or derogatory of 
His Majesty's Sovereignty in Parliament from 7 July 1766. 

i page. 

Lord Barrington to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1774, April 16. Cavendish Square. — Concerning Capt. Campbell. 
Hears the Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts is dead. Suggests the 
appointment of a successor on the spot lest any accident happen to 
General Gage. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d Barrington 16 April 1774 relative to Capt. Campbell's 
Memorial, desiring military Rank. 

Enclosure : — 

Captain John Campbell to Lord Viscount Barrington. 

Memorial. Desiring his Lordship will move the King to 

grant him the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in America. 
Not signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — To the li* Ho n ble Lord Visco* Barrington His 
Majestys Secretary at War. The Memorial of Captain 
John Campbell. 



Lord Montfort to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, April 20. — Takes the liberty of enclosing this '* poor-man's 
memorial. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— -L d Montfort 20 April 1774 in behalf of M r Randall. 

y 82140. o 



210 

Enclosure : — 

1769, August 9. London. — William Randall. Memorial to 
[Lord Dartmouth] with a note recommending himself to succeed 
Mr. Oliver as Secretary of Massachusetts Bay. Remarks on 
the difference between the salary allowed him and that given 
Surveyors General of the Northern district. Gives an account 
of his expenses. Desires that the same salary and allowances 
as those of the Northern district may be made to him or that he 
may be restored to his former station of comptroller. 
Autograph signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed: — The Manorial of William Randall late Surveyor 
General of the Southern District in America London 
August 9M 1769. 

The Duke op Newcastle to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

[1774, April 21.] Exchequer, Thursday. — Begs attention and 
support to Gen 1 Clinton's memorial to the Treasury, which is referred to 
his Lordship's board. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Charles Garth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, April 23. Golden Square. — Eecommending Mr. Tatnell to 
succeed to the Naval Office of Georgia. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 



Sir Roger Newdigate to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 25. Spring Garden. — Becomg. Mr. Wm. Stephens of 
Georgia to be Naval Officer. 

Autograph, third person. With seal {broken). 1 quarto page. 

Colonel Elias Durnford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 27. London. — Difficulty there is in obtaining fees for 
surveys of land made by himself or his deputies. 
Autograph letter signed. 1^ pages. 

Endorsed ; — Col. Durnford 27 April 1774 concert fees as Surv r 
general of W. Florida. 

Enclosure :— 

Colonel Elias Durnford to Lord Dartmouth, 

Memorial. Law suits unjustly commenced against him since his 
departure from the Province. Difficulties in connection with 
his execution of the duty of Surveyor General. Hopes his 
Lordship will grant him redress. 
Autograph signed. 2 pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 28. Great Queen Street, Westminster.-— Concerning 
his astronomical researches. 

Autograph letter signed, If quarto pages. 



211 

James Ferguson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, April 28. — Memorial. Has fulfilled his office without any 
salary or other emolument than the perquisites which are so small that 
he finds it impossible to support himself thereupon. Desires a salary 
may be annexed to his appointments. 

Original signed, f page. 

Endorsed : — To the Right Hon be Lord Dartmouth, Secretary of State 
for the Colonies First Lord of Trade &c. &c. 

The humble Memorial of James Ferguson Ranger of the Woods 
and Forrests, and Marshal of the Court of Admiralty in West 
Florida. 

Edward Webster to Lord Dartmouth. 

1/74, April 28. Lisson Green near Paddington. — Advantage of 
continuing the bounty granted on the importation of naval stores. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal (broke?i)» 1 quarto page. 

Massachusetts. 

N.D. [Qy. spring of 1774.] — Queries for consideration previous to 
the instructions to be given to General Gage and the other steps to be 
taken in consequence of the Act for regulating the Government of the 
Province of Massachusetts Bay. 

Draft. If pages. 

Endorsed : — Mass. Bay Queries. 

The Earl of Hardwicke to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, May 8. Richmond. — Has been reading over the American 
Regulation Bill. His opinion and suggested alterations. 
Autograph letter signed. 4§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — E. of Hardwicke 8 May 1774. Thoughts on American 
Bills before Parliament. 

Paul Wentworth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, May 8. Poland Street. — Requesting an audience on American 
affairs. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

The Reverend William Stringer to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, May 14, Philadelphia. — Acknowledges his obligations to his 
Lordship and knows of no better way of expressing his gratitude than 
by acting up to his character as a clergyman. Distribution he has 
made of the bibles and prayer books given him by his Lordship. Knows 
he will be pleased to hear that his labours are blessed amongst his 
congregation. Mr. Persey's preaching is not acceptable. Consternation 
in Boston on hearing that their harbour is to be blocked up. All the 
colonies seem to unite to oppose the authority of Parliament. 
Recommends Mrs. Stringer's son. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Rev. M r Stringer Philad. 14 May 1774. 

O 2 



212 

Major General Haldimand to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, May 15. — The accounts received before the arrival of the 
packet as late as 14 April had made known the plan of operations 
intended to bring Boston to a sense of order. It is the opinion of many 
people here that they will acknowledge their fault. Will defer any 
changes with regard to troops until he hears from General Gage. 
Intends suggesting the propriety of stationing a couple of regiments at 
Crown Point under pretence of rebuilding that fort. Has ordered a 
company and a half of artillery, field pieces and ammunition to Boston 
according to orders received from Gen 1 Gage of the 6th ultimo. 

Extract. 2 pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 129, fo. 287. An extract 
was presented to the Houses of Parliament amongst other American 
papers, 19 and 20 June 1775.] 



Joseph Ward to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, May 20. Boston. — His opinion concerning the restoration of 
harmony between England and America. The violent measures which 
are adopted to subject the Americans will never prosper and are pregnant 
with ruin to the nation. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Ward Boston 20 May 1774, on American Affairs. 



B. Roberts to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, May 28. — Has mentioned to his Lordship that his long 
acquaintance with Governor Browne has made him wish to be settled 
near his concerns of the Mississippi. Hears that a town is to be formed 
at the White Clifl's with a Lieutenant Governor who is to be dependent 
on the Governor of Pensacola. Gives his reasons for soliciting that 
appointment. 

Autcgrapk letter signed. 2f pages, 

Endorsed:— B. Roberts 28 May 1774. Ex. 



Governor Sir Francis Bernard to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, May 30. Aylesbury. — Requesting an office for his son. 
Letter signed. 1J quarto pages. 



Sir Charles Burdett to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, June 2. Roxbury near Boston in New England Gives an 

account of his family connections. Appointments he has held in 
America. Desires his Lordship will use his influence to procure him 
a better collectorship or some more lucrative employment. Should 
the place of commissioner of the Customs for America be vacated by 
Mr. Robinson would be glad to succeed to that or any other profitable 
collectorship. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed:— S r Cha. Burdet Roxbury N. Eng d 2 June 1774. 



213 

American Trade. 

1774, June 9. — Printed letter from J. Massie addressed to The 
Principal Landholders of England and to the Principal Citizens of 
London. Announcing the titles of three treatises he proposes to publish 
on the subject of commerce with Europe and the British American 
colonies. 

2 pages. 

Colonel William Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, June 14. Great Pulteney Street. — Soliciting preferment. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages, 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, June 16. Lower Grosvenor Street. — Private. Desires to 
know the conduct he should pursue in so delicate an affair, wishing to 
serve North Carolina and at the same time avoid giving offence to 
Governor Martin. 

Autograph, third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Tryon 16 June 1774 private with papers con- 
cerne N. Carolina. 

Enclosures : — 

North Carolina General Assembly to the King. 

Address. Signed John Harvey, Speaker. Express their loyalty. 
Considered as the " reservoir " which chiefly supplies the 
materials for framing and supporting the British Navy, claim 
in this regard the favourable notice of Government, Set forth 
the disadvantages arising to them from the instruction given to 
their present Governor with reference to the terms upon which 
only he will give his assent to a laic for establishing Courts of 
Justice. Desire the restoration of those privileges they have 
hitherto enjoyed in the process by attachments in common with 
their sister colonies. 
Original. 5 J pages. 

Committee of the House of Assembly to Governor Tryon 

of New York. 

Address signed by John Harvey and seven others. Complaining 
of the difference in the system of laws which their Governor has 
been instructed by His Majesty to introduce. Upon this 
account they have addressed the King and desire that his 
Excellency will convey it for them and support their solicitations. 
The application of the Assembly to him is the result of affection 
and a firm reliance upon his future efforts in their favour. 
Original signed. 2§ pages. 

Governor William Tryon to Governor Jostah Martin. 

1774, February 15. New York. — Is much concerned to find he 
has met with so many difficulties in, his public transactions. 



214 



Enclosures — cont, 



Cannot accept of the compliment paid him. Is amazed at the 
Deputy Auditor's conduct^ which he condemns. Since the 
calamity at Fort George both he and 31rs. Try on have been 
extremely ill. Intends sailing in the spring for England. 
Abstract, signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Try on to Gov* Martin New York 15 
febv 1774. 

Governor Josiah Martin to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, April 5. Neiv Bern, North Carolina. — Cannot forego this 
opportunity to make his adieus before Tryorts departure. 
Knowing the interest he takes in the welfare of North Carolina 
and in order to prevent the ill impressions he may receive 
with regard to his own proceedings at the late session, he lays 
before him a few facts, and leaves him to comment upon them 
at his leisure. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 J pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Martin Newbern 5 Ap l 1774. Rec d in 
London June 1774. Ans r - 



Richard Eeeve to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, June 17, Saturday afternoon, [should be 18]. No. 17, Strand. — 
Sends, for his Lordship's information, the enclosed which is written by a 
principal officer in the Customs in the port of Philadelphia. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — R d Reeve 17 June 1774 with Extract of a Letter from 
Philadelphia. 

Enclosure : — 

1774, May 15. Extract of a letter from Philadelphia. The 
sober part of the people noir say it will be right to pay for the 
destruction of the tea at Boston aud the losses incurred by 
sending it back from this place and New York and to petition 
for a repeal of the act. Commends the measure of removing 
the officers of the Customs from Boston and the appointment of 
General Gage to that government as being very wise and giving 
a degree of credit to administration. Hopes it will end in good 
order, quiet, and a respect to the laws. 
1 page. 



Governor William Tryon. 

1774, June 21. London. — Receipts and disbursements. Taken from 
he account of Mess vs Drummond. 
2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — A State of Governor Tryon's Disbursements taken from 
the Ace 1 of Mess rs Drummonds Bankers exclusive of those from 
the Provincial Emoluments & King's Salary in New York. 



215 

Maryland. 

1774, June 22-25. — Proceedings at a meeting of the Committee 
appointed by the several counties of the Province of Maryland at the 
city of Annapolis the 22nd June 1774 and continued by adjournment 
from day to day until the 25th day of same month. Containing ten 
resolutions touching various Acts of Parliament, non-importation, union 
with other colonies and a general congress, and an order that copies be 
transmitted to the committees of correspondence for the several colonies 
and also published in the Maryland Gazette. 

Printed. 1 f pages. 

The Duke of Portland to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, June 25, Saturday. Welbeck. — Recommending Lord Torrington 
for the government of New York. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Royalist Militia. 

1774, June 25, London. — Governor William Tryon. A State of the 
Militia of the Province of New York drawn out from the Returns that 
have been made since the Fire at Fort George of the 29th December 
1773 wherein was consumed a complete state of the Militia. 

Original signed. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — State of the Militia of the Province of New York In 
1774. Ex. 

Biuret Tavel to Mons. De Walltravers. 

1774, June 28. London. — Remarks on Lord Dartmouth's offer of 
land in East Florida. Gives his opinion concerning the nature of the 
soil in those parts. 

Letter signed. With seal. 3f pages. French. 

Fire at Fort George, New York. 

1774, June 28. London. — An Inventory of the Furniture which 
was destroyed in His Excellency Governor Try on 's house in Fort 
George in New York the 29 December 1773. Signed by Governor 
William Tryon. For the Earl of Dartmouth. Beginning with the 
pictures in the Council Chamber — King William and Queen Ann, 
King George the first, King George the second and Queen etc. etc. 

23 pages. 

Endorsed: — N. York Inventory of Furniture, Plate & c & c & c . 
destroyed by the Fire in Fort George, the 29 th of December 1773. 

John Cambel to Lord Dartmouth. 

(" A copy of a memorial delivered to his Lordship in May or June 
1774.") — For a grant of 1200 acres of land on the Mississippi in the 
province of West Florida to himself and certain other lands to several 
persons whom he names. 

Copy. Signed. If pages. [The original Memorial is described in 
the Catalogue of Lord Dartmouth's MSS. previously issued, 11th 
Report, Appendix, Part V., p. 354.] 

Endorsed : — Engineer CambePs Memorial for Land. 



216 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson. 

1774, July 1, — Paper marked C. Conversation between the King, 
Lord Dartmouth and Mr. Hutchinson. Copied verbatim from Mr. H's 
Journal. It begins, " Received a card from Ld. Dartmouth desiring 
to see me at his house before one o'clock. I went soon after 
12." Recounts his introduction to the King. Conversation on the 
shutting of the Boston port. His Majesty's favourable opinion of 
Hutchinson's administration. On the betrayal of the latter's private 
letters and on Messrs. Hancock, Cushing and Adams. Forms of 
religion in the Colonies. Further enquiries made by the King as to 
Hutchinson's administration and to the state of the province and the 
other colonies. [Printed in the Diarv and Letters of Thomas Hutchin- 
son, Vol. L, 157.] 

Accompanying this is a document marked u B. Copy of Marginal Note 
in the late Gov. Hutchinson's MS History of Massachusets Bay." 
This relates to the procuring and sending to America of his private 
letters. Reference is made to the duel between Mr. Temple and 
Mr. Whately, the appearance in the Public Advertiser of a letter by 
Dr. Franklin, the hearing of the case on 9 January 1774, Mr. Wed- 
derburn's speech and the statement made by the Agent of the House of 
Representatives of Massachusetts against the Governor and Lieut. 
Governor. " The manner in which these letters were obtained was 
never fully discovered . . . ., they must have been unfairly obtained from 
Mr. Whately in his lifetime .... From some circumstances there 
were strong grounds to suppose, that they had been in the possession of 
another person, a Member of Parliament, by whom they had been com- 
municated to D r Franklin ; but Governor Hutchinson, upon information 
given him, thought it prudent to discourage further inquiry, which would 
increase the number or malevolence of his avowed enemies." [See note 
on page 170.] 

20 quarto pages and 3^ pages respectively. 

The Earl of Hardwicke to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, July 3. Richmond. — Congratulates on so happy a beginning 
of his American plan. Warns against insisting on an express acknow- 
ledgment of the right of taxation but a general recognition of legislative 
power is no more than necessary. His satisfaction at Hutchinson's 
acquittal. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — E. of Hardwicke. 3 July 1774. Thoughts on American 
Affairs. 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 3. Parliament Street. — Remarks concerning the Council 
of Massachusetts. Difficulty of arranging precedence. 
Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed; — Gov r Hutchinson 3 July 1774 private. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, July 5. Great Queen Street, Westminster. — "My Lord I 
should have waited for D r Horsleys decision in regard to my Tables, 



217 

but the necessity of preparing for the approaching expedition of my 
GI Survey admitted no longer suspension as otherwise I should have 
been obliged to set out unprepared for this new method of levelling 
Streams Rivers &c, consequently not ben able to add this operation to 
that of fixing every place in its precise Latitude and Longitude, M r de 
Luc's prescribed formula would increase the fatigue of my Calculation 
afresh, which I have been obliged to lessen by constructing Zonical 
Tables, to which I have added also the labor of constructing Atmos- 
pherical Tables so as they are in this present form adjoined to a small 
Treatise which I beg leave to deliver to Your Lordship for His Majesty. 
I shall in a week's time have it in my power to present Your Lordship 
with a Copy to be added to my Reports, which and my self I beg 
leave also to recommend to your Lordships protection and am most 
respectfully, My Lord, Your Lordships most obedient and most humble 
serv t w q. # de Rrahm." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Major Philip Skene to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 5. — Ballymote near Boyle. Items of intelligence. 
Autograph letter signed. 2f quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Maj r Skene o July 1774. On Irish & American Affairs. 

Enclosure : — 

Governor William Franklin to [Major Philip Skene]. 

1774, May 3. Philadelphia. — Thanks for information as to 

what passed between Major Skene and Lord Dartmouth 

respecting himself. Was conscious that he had not given any 

just cause of offence to Government, but his friendly letter was 

exceedingly well timed. 

Autograph letter signed, 1 ^ quarto pages. 

The Honourable Mrs. D. Chetwynd to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1 774, July 11. St. James's. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Hon. M rs Chetwynd 11 July 1774, relative to her Lands 
in America. 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, July 11. Parliament Street. — Speaks of enclosing a letter and 
a newspaper. Is not fearful of consequences, especially as after the 
receipt of the two bills they are taking measures to obtain relief. Can- 
not express his obligation with regard to Lady Dartmouth presenting 
his daughter to the Queen. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Hutchinson 11 July 1774. 

Peter Livius to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

.774, July 11. — Sending, according to his Lordship's direction, the 
enclosed memorial. 

Autograph letter signed. \ page. 



218 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to the Lords op the Treasury. 

1774, July 12. London. — Desiring a salary may be allowed his 
office of Chief Justice of Neiv Hampshire. 
Signed. 1 ^ p ages. 

Colonel J. Burgoyne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, July 12. Tingrith near Wodburn. — In favour of Captain Grant 
whose memorial he encloses. 

Autograph letter signed. 2f guar to pages. 

Endorsed: — Col. Burgoyne 12 July 1774, with the Memorial of 
Cap n Grant. 

Enclosure : — 

Captain John Grant to the Board op Trade. 

1774, July 11. London. — Petition. Account of his services for 
the King. Is now desirous of settling in North America and 
hopes for the lot of afield officer. Prays his Lordship to move 
the King to grant him lands in New York. 
1 page. 

Endorsed: — Petition Capt n Grant to the Lords of Trade 
11th July 1774. 

C. Williamos to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 12. St. James's Place. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Williamos. 12 July 1774, desiring to succeed 
M r Colden as Surveyor &c. of N. York. 

Governor Montfort Browne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 13. Cowes (Isle of White).— Difficulty of getting out 
of port on account of bad weather. Is very disappointed to find 
Mr. Atwood does not intend going out with him. Hopes his Lordship 
will think of his request with respect to fixing Dartmouth Town on his 
township. Wishes that Engineer Cambel may return to his duty, as 
he promised to superintend a church Browne proposes building on the 
Mississippi. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Browne Cowes July 13 1774. 

The Bishop of London to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 14. Tunbridge Wells. — At the desire of the Clergy of 
New York transmits the enclosed address which has been sent to him 
without a seal, that he might be informed of the contents, and thus 
recommend it to his Lordship's protection. Dr. Cooper of New York 
mentions an appeal of Governor Tryon in a case between Mr. Bloomer 
the minister, and the churchwardens of the parish of Jamaica in that 



219 

province. Refers to the intended addition to the salary of the three 
Protestant ministers in Quebec. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 large quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Bp of London. 14 July 1774, on an Episcopate at 
N. York. 

Enclosure : — 

Episcopal Clergy of New York and New Jersey to Lord 

Dartmouth. 

1774, May 18. New York. — Address of the Episcopal Clergy of 
the Provinces of New York and Neiv Jersey met in Convention. 
Desiring his Lordship's friendly interposition in behalf of the 
National Church in His Majesty's American Plantations. 
Disadvantages in the want of an Episcopate. 

Original. Signed Samuel Auchmuty D.D., Thomas B. 
Chandler, D.D., and three others. 8 quarto pp. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to [the Episcopal Clergy of New York 

and New Jersey]. 

1774, July 14. — Acknowledging receipt of their letter of 18 May 
through the hands of the Bishop of London. Assurances of his heart) 
concurrence with them in their sentiments and wishes on the great and 
important subject of an American Episcopate upon the wise and 
equitable plan proposed. Promises to use his efforts in the matter. 

Autograph copy. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— Com ee of Episc 1 Clergy N. York. 18 May 1774. 



George Suckling to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 15. Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 
Endorsed : — M r Suckling 15 July 1774 desire Employm*. 

Major Philip Skene to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 16. Ballymote near Boyle. — Quotes a letter from his son at 
Skenesborough touching the confusion over the New Hampshire settlers. 
Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Maj r Skene 16 July 1774 conce Settlers on the Back of 
N. Hampshire. 

Charles Garth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 25. Devizes. — Papers he has placed before Mr. Pownall 
relative to the proceedings of the Assembly of South Carolina in March 
last. Gives his thoughts upon what he considers proper to be com- 
municated to his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed, 2| quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— M r Garth 26 July 1774. 



220 

Frederick Montagu to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, July 30. Popplewick. — Remarks how the newspapers 
contradict each other with regard to American affairs. Hopes that the 
reported determination of the Government to adopt healing measures is 
true. Has had two letters from Mr. Gordon. He hopes to be a pillar 
of the government which his Lordship, Wharton and Pitt are founding 
in Vandalia. 

Autograph letter signed. 2J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — F. Montagu Esq r 30 July 1774. 

] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 3. — Signed " A Friend to y e Publick." Being informed 
that M r Neave is applying for a grant of land in America, takes the 
liberty of acquainting that he is credibly informed the land is supposed 
to contain copper ore. 

Autograph. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Anon, concerns copper mine in America. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 4. Dartmouth Street, Westminster. — Thanks him for 
his patronage by which Lord North reinstated him in his provincial 
office of East Florida. Shows that even now he is not on a footing 
with Mr Holland. Reasons which detain him in London. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ pages. 

Endorsed: — M r De Brahm 12 Aug. 1774 on his Surveys, 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

[1774, August 4.1 Thursday night.— Has conversed with the 
Attorney-General who thinks Dyer's case a foolish unconsidered pro- 
ceeding on the part of General Gage and Admiral Montagu. No facts 
are charged on him or others for which they could be tried or prosecuted 
here. All Dyer says about the destruction of the tea is mere hearsay. 
He should be immediately released. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — J. Pownall 4 Aug. 1774, on Dyer's Case & Destruction 
of Tea at Boston. 

Samuel Lee to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 5. Manchester, New England. — Enclosing a letter to 
His Majesty. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ pages. 

Endorsed: — S. Lee Manchester in N. England Aug. 5 1774. 

Enclosure : — 

Samuel Lee to the King. 

1774, August 5. Manchester, New England. — Gives his opinion 
concerning the parliamentary measures pursued towards America 
by Great Britain. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 



221 

Samuel Lee to [Lord Dartmouth j. 

1774, August 5. Manchester, New England. — Gives a short sketch 
of a plan for a British and American reconciliation and agreement in 
establishing an East India Company; in paying 5 p. c. on all profits and 
a fifth part of all gold and silver mines. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 J pages. 



Resolves of the Colony of Virginia. 

At a meeting of the deputies of the several counties at Williamsburg 
from 1st to (5th August 1774 to consider and agree upon au Association 
of non-importation of British goods. 

MS. 3£ pages. 

Endorsed : — Resolves of Virginia Aug. 1774. 



The Earl of H[ardwioke] to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 7. Wrest. — Thoughts on Ameiican Affairs. 
Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Peter Livius to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 8. Tunbridge. — His ill-health makes him wish to 
remain in the country as much as he can. There is now an additional 
reason for expediting his business, the General Assembly having 
proceeded so far with their votes that the Governor has dissolved them 
which will not be very likely to pacify matters. Necessity for his 
presence in New Hampshire. Desires his Lordship will speedily 
dispatch him there. Prays he may be allowed to present his memorial 
to the Treasury. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Livius. 



The Duke and Duchess of Northumberland to Lord 

Dartmouth. 

1774, August 8. Alnwick Castle. — With reference to Lord Percy's 
safe arrival at Boston. 

Autograph letter in the third person. ^ quarto page. 

Endorsed: — D. of Northumberland 8 Aug. 1774 Thanks for Infor- 
mation cons L d Percy. 



Lord North to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 12. Saturday. Bushy Park. — " The paper which 
M r Tryon shewed me at the Treasury could hardly be called an 
account." 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lord North 12 Aug. 1774, on Gov* Tryon's Claim's 
upon Gov*. 



222 

Governor Robert Eden to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1774, August 15. Conduit Street. — Thinks it his duty (in the 
present crisis) and proposes returning to Maryland. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Gov 1 " Eden Aug. 15 1774, on his Departure to Mary- 
land. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 16. London. — Expresses his astonishment at hearing 
of Temple's acknowledgement that he had seen the letters among 
Mr. Whately's files and that he had them in his possession in a packet 
directed to Doctor Franklin. Desires his Lordship will endeavour to 
obtain further information on the subject. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Private Gov r Hutchinson 16 Aug. 1774. 



The Honourable Henry (?) Wilmot to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 16. Bloomsbury Square. — Upon the subject of deeds 
belonging to Lord Dartmouth. The postscript refers to a letter 
received from Pennsylvania. 

Letter signed. 2^- quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Hon. {concealed by wafer) Wilmot Esq r 16 Aug. 1774. 

George Reynolds to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 23. No. ], Laurence Poultny Lane, Cannon Street. 
Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Reynolds 23 Aug. 1774 cones Gov* on the 
Mississippi. 1 Inclosure. Copy of a Letter from N. York, 
5 July 7774. 

Enclosure : — 

Colonel Robertson to J M. 

1774, July 5. A'eiv York. — The sentiments of the people of 
Boston. Mentions one Adams, a poor man, with very powerful 
wrangling abilities, who governs in the Assemblies. Gives 
information concerning Massachusetts. 

Copy. 2 quarto pages. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 26. St. Augustine. — No. 2. Private. Considers it 
would be highly wrong to make a settlement upon the land located by 
Mr. Wooldridge under the present circumstances of the province. 
Describes that which he has directed the Surveyor General to run out 
for his Lordship at the head of Hillsborough River. Recommends 
Mr. Alexander Gray. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov 1 ' Tonyn. 26 Aug. 1477 Private, 



223 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 30. Dartmouth Street, Westminster. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Debrahm 31 Aug. — 74 desiring M r Ferguson 
Appointment as his Assistant. 

John Blackburn to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 31. Wednesday. Scots Yard. — Gives intelligence 
received in various letters concerning the state of New York. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 guar to pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Blackburne 31 Aug. 1774, inclosing Resolves of the 
Committee of N. York. 

Enclosure : — 

Committee op Correspondence in New York. 

1774, July 13. Committee Chamber. — Proceedings. Containing 
ten resolutions on the subject of the infringement of their rights 
by recent Acts of Parliament and an order that the same be 
printed and distributed in hand bills. 
1 printed page '. 

The Earl op Hardwicke to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 31. Wrest. — On American Affairs. Expresses his 
acknowledgments for the obliging attention given to his letters. 
Apprehends the worst consequences if, after the first Congress has been 
allowed to be held, the colonists, feeling their own strength, should 
agree to hold annual ones or form associations for self-defence. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, August 31. America Square, Crutched Friars. — Apologises 
for sending enclosures which he had hoped to do through means of 
Lord Marchmont. Would like an audience. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— -M r Molleson 31 Aug. 1774. 

Enclosures : — 

Extract of a letter from Maryland to William Molleson. On 
the resolutions passed at a general meeting of committees from 
the several counties of this province. Encloses a private copy. 
Every newspaper justifies the assertion that they contain the 
sense of America in general. 
2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a letter from Maryland to 

Molleson Esq r 1774. 

1774, June 22-25. — Proceedings of a Meeting of the Committees 
appointed by the several counties of Maryland, at the city of 
Annapolis the 22nd day of June 1774, and continued by 



224 

Enclosures—- cont. 

adjournment from day to day, till the 25th day of the same 
month. Containing ten resolutions etc. same as above under 
this date. 

Printed. If pages. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, August 31. St. Augustine.— No. 3. Private. If Mr. Ernst 
comes out, will show him every attention. Has given the Surveyor 
General directions, conformable to his requests. It will afford him 
great pleasure to be of service. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Gov 1 " Tonyn 31 Aug. 1774. Private. 

The Eeverend John Vardill to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 1. No. 33, Suffolk Street, Charing Cross. — Soliciting 
his Lordship's countenance on the present occasion and hinting at the 
position in which he desires to be placed. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — M r Vardill 1 Sep r 1774, relative to Keligion in 
America. 

Enclosure : — 

Observations on the appointme?it of an American Bishop. In the 
Reverend John VardilVs hand. " The Equity and Utility of 
such a Measure seems no longer doubted. The only Question 
now is whether an immediate appointment would be seasonable.^ 
Gives his reasons for determining in the affirmative. 
If quarto pages. 

Colonel T. Howard to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, September 3. Earsham, near Bungey, Suffolk. — Apologises for 
both his friends and himself having been troublesome upon the subject 
of American Governments. Desires to succeed Sir Win. Johnson. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Earl Gower to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, September 5. Trentham. — The draft to Lord Dunmore seems 
both proper and necessary but cannot take it upon himself to write 
purposely to him. Hopes the accounts from North America are more 
favourable than those given in the newspapers, if not, fears for a short 
and troublesome session of Parliament. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Earl Gower Sept. 5, 1774, relative to L d Dunmore. 

The Reverend John Vardill to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 5. Suffolk Street. — Application he makes in behalf 
of the College of New York. Desires Lord Dartmouth's interest with 
the King on the subject. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Rev d M r Vardill 12 Sep* 1774. 



225 

The Reverend William Gordon, Rector of Mobile, to the 

Board of Trade. 

1774, September 6. Mobile. — Petition for land on the River Mobile. 
Original signed, f folio page. 

Endorsed : — Petition of the Rev d W m Gordon for a Mandamus for 
4,000 Acres. 



Sir Gilbert Elliot to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 7. Monle near Keswick, by Carlisle. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— S r Gil. Elliot 7 Sep r 1774, rec& M r Jauncey to be of 
the Council of N. York. 



Captain Grant to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 7. Margaret Street, Cavendish Square. — Desires 
to pay his respects in person. Wishes to convey some ideas concerning 
America. 

Autograph letter signed Jo n Grant. 9, quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Capt n Grant 9 Sep* 1774 on American Lands, Granted 
to Officers &c. 



Peter Duval to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 10. Hackney. — A civil government soon to be 
established a few miles from the Natchez on the Mississippi. Governor 
Brown's reasons for such an establishment. Desires the post of secretary 
and receiver of quit rents. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— -M r Duval 12 Sep r 1774. Soliciting an Office in 
W. Florida. 



Edmund Fanning to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 12. New Bond Street, London. — The improved 
state of health of Mr. Colden, the Surveyor General of New York, 
cancels application for that office. Asks for the appointment of Chief 
Justice of Jamaica. 

Autograph letter signed. 2f folio pages. 

Endorsed:— M. r Fanning 12 Sep r 1774, for the office of Ch. Justice 
of Jamaica. 



General Sir Jeffery Amherst to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 14. Montreal. — Communicates the contents of a 
letter of 8 August received from New York which mentions the arrival 
of the June packet with dispatches for Gage ; it is concluded they 
contain the new Acts regarding Boston ; these will be the touchstone to 
try the mettle of the men of Massachusetts ; the preparations for the 
General Congress go on and the deputies chosen are not of a spirit to 
propose healing measures ; General Lee has gone to influence Rhode 

j 82140. P 



226 

Island, thence to Boston where his admiration for Gage, and his 
hatred for Government must lead him to some inconsistencies. Quotes 
from a letter of 3 August from another hand, stating the bad humour 
circulating through the Colonies, the fears that the General Congress 
will be unanimous in a non-importation agreement, and remarking that 
upon the want of virtue at home the colonists rely for carrying every 
contested point. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— S r Jeff. Amherst, 14 Sep r 1774. 



List of Letters. 

From Colonel Howard and various persons on American affairs, the 
dates ranging from 31 January to 14 September 1774. With a note of 
the contents of each letter. 

2 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — List. 



Edmund Fanning to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 16. New Bond Street, London. — Rests his pre- 
tensions to the consideration of His Majesty's Ministers, on his 
sufferings in the cause of Government, and on Lord Dartmouth's 
goodness. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Fanning 16 Sept 1 1774, with Thanks for a L r rec d 
from E. of Dartmouth. 



General Gage to Governor Hutchinson. 

1774, September 17. — Postscript of a letter dated Boston 17th Sep- 
tember 1774 referred to in General Gage's letter of the . . . September 
to Lord Dartmouth. In Mr. Knox's hand. Suggests suspending the 
execution of the Acts for a time that the Province might send home 
Deputies, and, in the meantime, to prepare for the worst, Hanoverians 
and Hessians may be hired, for by all appearances " these provinces 
must be first totally subdued before they will obey and a powerful Force 
must in that case be employ'd." 

1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from Gen 1 Gage to Gov 1 ' Hutchin- 
son dated Boston 17 Sept. 1774. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 20. Golden Square. — With list on a scrap of paper 
of 1 1 Members of Council. Private letters received from New England 
he is sending to Lord Dartmouth. Judgment that may be made from 
Mr. Erving's account of the state of the province. Information to be 
found in a newspaper of August 15. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — (With the two following). Gov r Hutchinson 20 & 21 
Sep r 1774. 



227 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

[1774], September 20, p.m. — Mr. Royall has declined, which 
Hutchinson thinks is very well. Reasons for thinking it probable that 
Messrs. Danforth, Erving, and Green will finally decline. 

Autograph, third person. | quarto page. 

Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 21. Golden Square. — Remarks upon letters he is 
sending. Narrates a circumstance which muse facilitate the execution 
of the Act for changing the Council. States that Winthrop, Hancock, 
and Doctor Cooper are members of the Corporation. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

List of Letters. 

From Governor Hutchinson and others, the dates ranging from 
1 March to 21 September 1774, with a note of the contents of each. 
1} folio pages. 



Endorsed : — List. 



Cabinet Minute. 



1774, September 29. — Held at Lord North's in Downing Street. 
Upon the advisability of dissolving Parliament, and calling a new 
one. 

\ quarto page. 

Endorsed .—Minute of Cabinet 29 Sep* 1774. 

James Ireland to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 30. — Steps taken by the Americans upon their 
resolution to receive no teas from England. Orders are sent to 
Holland and vessels are now cruising to the westward and as high as the 
Isle of Ascension to meet with French and other India ships in order 
to purchase tea of them. Address at Bordeaux where Dartmouth may 
write, should any other particulars be desired. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

Endorsed : —My Ireland Bristol 1774. 

Extract of a Letter from Connecticut. 

[?1774, September]. — Believes they support Government and execute 
the laws with more firmness than any colony on the continent. There 
are some few persons who take the utmost pains to provoke the people 
in order to meet with some insult and thereby gain favour with the 
Ministry. One of these is a Mr. Peters, a clergyman in Connecticut, a 
man of mean character. He annoyed the people to the utmost of his 
power and is now gone to Boston to put himself under the protection of 
General Gage and from there is bound to London. Warns against the 
tales he may tell. 

2 \ pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter from Connecticut relative to Rev d 
M r Peters. 

i> 2 



228 



Cabinet Minute. 



1774, October 3. Monday. — Held at Lord North's house. Lord 
Dartmouth communicated the dispatches received on Saturday last from 
General Gage and Admiral Graves. State of affairs in New England 
to be further considered at auother meeting. Advisability of con- 
sulting the Admiralty upon the expediency of sending two or three 
ships of war with a detachment from the marines to Boston imme- 
diately. 

% folio page. 

Endorsed .-—Minute of Cabinet Oct. 4 1774. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 



-* > 



1774, October 4. London. — Nominates James Jauncey, junior 
Colonel William Bayard, and David Colden to serve in the Council of 
New York. 

Letter signed. f folio page. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, October 10, at noon. Dartmouth Street, Westminster. — 
Reasons given by Mr. Kamus for the detention of the Treasury letter. 
Refers to the conditional delivery of his (De Brahm's) commission into 
Lord Dartmouth's hand. His suspension now taken off and his 
character approved by the Treasury. Compares his salary etc. with 
that of Mr. Holland. Desires he may be put on an equality with him, 
and continued in his provincial office. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, October 11. — Reduced situation of Mrs. De Brahm's father in 
St. Augustine. In his younger days he held the post of Sheriff of 
Maryland. Wishes to renew the deputation he gave his father- 
in-law in 1767 at Governor Grant's desire. Hopes his Lordship will 
approve and endorse the appointment. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Pierre Roubaud to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, October 11. Volburg. — His sentiments concerning the present 
state of America. Remarks on the measures being pursued by 
Government. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. French. 

Lord Barrington to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, October 14. Bath. — Gunpowder on board a vessel at 
Plymouth, bound for North America. His advice to the Collector of 
Customs. Considers it right to acquaint his Lordship, but does not 
know by what authority it can be stopped. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Bath 14 th October 1774. Lord Vise* Barrington R/ 
18 th C. 



229 

William Gerard de Brahm: to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, October 14. Dartmouth Street, Westminster.— With Lord 
Dartmouth's approbation he will date and sign the enclosed letter to 
his son-in-law in his presence. He has advised Mr. Fairland, who is 
going to St. Augustine, to beg his Lordship's commands for that 
place. Desires the Governor may be informed of his (de Brahm's) 
re-establishment. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 
William Gerard de Brahm to Frederic George Mulcaster. 

He has appointed his brother Attorney on behalf of Mulcaster' s 
children. Instructions he has given. He appoints Mulcaster 
his deputy in the provincial office, during the time he {the writer) 
will be able to continue the service of general survey and no 
longer. His allowance to his son-in-law and to his grand- 
children, also to John Row. 

Autograph letter not signed. 1^ quarto pages. 



Newspaper Cutting. 

1774, October 14-16. — Containing, amongst other items, Extracts 
of letters from Plymouth and Portsmouth 14 and 16 October as to the 
arrival and departure of frigates &c. for America, extract of a letter 
from an officer in the camp at Boston dated 24 August, and Mr. Burke's 
speech from the hustings at Bristol. 

1 strip. 

General Gage. 

1774, June 26 to October 17. — Excerpta from letters of General 
Thomas Gage. Measures taken by several gentlemen to persuade the 
people to comply with the Act of Parliament to save Boston from ruin. 
Town-meeting at Boston ; endeavours to annihilate the Committee of 
Correspondence proved ineffectual. Protest made by gentlemen of 
Worcester County. Disposition of the people; civil government is 
near its end. Gage despairs of any overtures he has endeavoured to 
make, unless they come recommended by the Continental Congress. 
Quotations from two enclosures in his letter of 20 September No. 13. 
Judges of the Inferior Court of the County of Hants in Massachusetts 
Bay called to meet the mob, to hear allegations against them. Con- 
cessions which they were compelled to sign. An anonymous account 
of the proceedings against the Inferior Court at Springfield in the County 
of Hampshire. 

Extracts. 8 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Excerpta from some of Gen 1 Gage's Letters. 



William Eden to John Pownall. 

1774, October 18. Tuesday, 11 a.m. — Directions to Sir Joseph Yorke 
at the Hague in case the Ehode Islander should not have sailed, to 
obtain if possible the re-landing and detention of her cargo, either as an 



230 

act of power on the part of the Dutch Minister, or under some pretext 
of contraband trade. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. J quarto page. 

Endorsed .—18 th October 1774. M r Eden, J. P. K/ d° A. 

Note from John Pownall. 

[1774, after October 18.] — Account of steps taken upon intelligence 
received from Sir Joseph Yorke of a vessel loading at Amsterdam with 
firearms. 

Autograph, not signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Note from M r Pownall. 

General Gage to the Provincial Congress. 

1774, October 20. Boston. — Minute of 20 October containing 
General Gage's Answer to the Address of the Provincial Congress 
dated Province House October 17. In Governor Hutchinson's hand. 

I}} folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Gen 1 Gage's Answ r to the Address of the Provincial 
Congress 20 Oct 1 ' 1774. 

The Reverend John Vardill to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, October 21. London. — Quotes from a letter which he has 
received from New York. Injury done to the fair trader by these 
smugglers (see Endorsement), added to the great number of those who 
import tea from Holland. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Rev. M 1 ' Vardill Oct. 21, 1774, relative to a smuggling 
Vessel at the Isle of Ascension. 

J. Allen to Lord [Dartmouth]. 

1774, October 22. Shrewsbury. — Enclosure sent from Hardwick by 
Mrs. Powys ; presumes she wishes it forwarded to his Lordship. 
Autograph letter signed. \ folio page. Mutilated. With seal. 

Enclosure : — 

B. Allen to Thomas Powys. 

1774, July. Frederick County, Maryland. — Inhabitants upon the 
Ohio driven into the interior parts of the country by the Indians. 
Alarm caused by their critical situation with Great Britain. 
Speaks of transmitting resolves of Maryland [qy. see above 
22-25 JuneJ] Refers to a scheme of non-importation proposed 
in 1768 to merchants of Philadelphia by Boston and New 
York Committees. State to which he is reduced ; his living is 
three years in arrear and the present disturbances form a good 
pretext for non-payment. Desires the post of Collector of His 
Majesty''* Customs upon the North Potomac. Mr. Ben net 
convicted here from Shrewsbury, is vow in Philadelphia. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Allen, Maryland. 



231 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartaiouth. 

1774, October 28. Dartmouth Street, Westminster. — His resolution 
to submit to his Lordship's orders and directions. Reasons for 
arranging matters as he has, with regard to Messrs. Mulcaster and 
Row, who have been instruments in Governor Grant's hands. Explains 
his inability to give up the £100 per annum. Memorial he will be 
obliged to lay before his Lordship, to have an additional sum allowed 
him by Parliament. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 large folio pages. 



Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, October 30. Boston. — Private. Detection of Samuel Dyer in 
enticing soldiers to desert ; was carried to England by the Admiral. 
Has returned with an affidavit he made before the Lord Mayor. 
Statements false ; the man a vagabond. General Gage is pleased his 
conduct is approved by His Majesty and Ministers. He is chagrined 
his endeavours have not met with better success. Belief current at 
Philadelphia that the Continental Congress has insisted that Boston shall 
pay for the tea. His concern that affairs have gone to so great a length 
that Great Britain cannot yield without giving up all her authority, unless 
some submission is shown on the part of the Colonies. Complaints 
made against him to the Continental Congress. Enclosures. Treatment 
received by a clergyman named Peters, who was driven here from 
Connecticut, M r Ingersoll, who was obliged to fly from his home in 
Berkshire County, goes by this conveyance. 

Duplicate letter signed. 5 J folio pages. [The autograph signed 
letter with enclosures is in the Public Record Office, series America and 
West Indies, Vol. 130, fo. 29.] 

Endorsed:— Gen 1 Gage Oct r 30, 1774. 

Enclosures : — 

P[eyton] R[andolph], on behalf of the General Congress, to 
Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage. 

1774, October 10. Philadelphia. — Newspaper cutting 5i"x3". 
That Genl. Gage tvoidd discontinue the fortifications in and about 
Boston, prevent invasions of private property, restrain the 
irregidarities of the soldiers, and give orders for open commu~ 
nication betioeen town and country. 



Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to the Honourable 
Peyton Randolph. 

1774, October 20. Boston. — " Representations should be made with 
Candour, and Matters stated exactly as they stand no 

man's property has been seized or hurt, except the King's . 
No troops have given less cause for complaint . . . but 
insults and provocations are daily given to both Officers and 
Soldiers, The communication between the Town and Country 
is free and unmolested . . . It gives me pleasure that you 
are endeavouring at a cordial reconciliation with the mother 
country ; which from what has transpired, I have despaired 
of ... I have endeavoured to be a mediator, if I could 



282 

Enclosures — cout. 

establish a foundation to work upon. . . . I should hope 
that decency and moderation here would create the same 
disposition at home . . ." 
Copy . 2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from General Gage, to tlie 
Hon ble Payton Randolph Esq r President of the American 
Continental Congress, sitting at Philadelphia. Dated 
Boston October 20 th 1774. 



[Lord Dartmoutfi] to the Lords op the Admiralty. 

1774, October. — Transmits letter from Sir Joseph Yorke to the Earl 
of Suffolk. They are to despatch a sloop or cutter to Amsterdam and 
the commander on his arrival is to send some trusty person with the 
enclosed letter to Sir Joseph from whom he will hear whether the 
Rhode Island vessel has, or has not sailed. Further instructions on this 
subject. 

Draft. Not signed. 2 pages. [Another draft is in the Public 
Record Office, Holland, Vol. 657.] 

Endorsed : — Dr* to L ds Admiralty B. 



Extract of a Letter from New York. 

1774, November 7. — Reasons for it being impolitic to call the 
Assemblies together at this time. Proceedings of Congress very 
generally disliked in this place. Considers this Province the most 
moderate and peaceable of any upon the Continent. Sends every 
proceeding of Congress which is yet made public here. 

1 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Lett, from N. York Nov 1 1774. 



Henry White to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, November 8. New York. — Fears the claims contained in the 
proceedings of Congress will not tend to conciliate matters on the other 
side of the water. Effect the General Election, which is near at hand, 
will have. His opinion concerning the non-exportation, said to take 
place in September — that it is only hung out in terrorem to Great Britain. 
Considers it would be policy to repeal the tea duty. Fervently wishes for 
the restoration of harmony. 

Copy. 2\ folio pages \ 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from M r Henry White to Gov r Tryon, 
dated N. York, 8 Nov'" 1774. Private. 



The Reverend J. W. Giberne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, November 9. — Belle Ville, in Richmond County, Rappahanock 
River, Virginia. — Enquires after his Lordship's health. Expresses his 
gratitude to Lord Dartmouth for his interposition with regard to his 
ordination. Giberne desired by the County of Richmond to be their 
Moderator in all their associating meetings. His acquiescence. 
Opinion concerning these people. They look to Lord Dartmouth to 



233 

disperse the threatening cloud now over America. Book he is sending 
to his Lordship. Transmits this letter by Cyrus Griffin. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Rev. M r Giberne Virginia Nov r 1774. 

Willjam Knox to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, November 15. Whitehall. — Disappointment at not receiving 
a letter from General Gage, nor any further account of Congress 
proceedings from Frankly n. Information from Colden. Intelligence 
obtained from a letter from one of the Congress, shown to Knox 
in confidence concerning the non- importation and non-exportat!on 
resolution. Different dispositions of the New England and other 
Governments. A petition to the King lies for consideration. Deputies 
for its presentation. Arrival of a ship from Salem brings private 
letters down to September 29. Return of the Commissioners of 
Customs to Boston. Carleton's arrival at Quebec. Communication 
between Gage and Carleton. Opinion about it ; it is so expressive of 
Gage's timidity and weakness that he has kept the letters secret in the 
office. Attempts are being made for the repeal of the Boston Act. 
Lord North thinks a paper addressed to the merchants will be of use ; 
Knox is to draw it up 

Autograph letter signed. 6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Knox 15 Nov. 1774. Ex. 

Emanuel Mathias to the Earl of Suffolk. 

1774, November 15. Hamburgh. — Information of the " Flora " 
being loaded with chests supposed to contain firearms, and forty chests 
of tea. Steps to be taken for the detection of her cargo. She will be 
ready to sail towards the latter end of next week. 

Extract. ^ folio page. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from M r Mathias To The Earl of 
Suffolk. Hamburgh }5 th Nov r 1774. 

Sir Joseph Yorke to the Earl of Suffolk. 

1774, November 18. Hague. — Imagines he will soon have no further 
occasion to trouble His Lordship about the Rhode Island vessel, as, 
according to information, it has begun to unload and is to winter at 
Amsterdam. 

Extract, j folio page. [The signed letter is in the Public Record 
Office, Foreign Office, Holland, Vol. 691.] 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from His Exc°y Sir Jo s Yorke to The 
Earl of Suffolk. Hague 18 th Nov p 1774. 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, November 19. Bath. — Private. On the subject of the enclosure. 
He can depend upon the facts therein contained, as it is from a friend, 
a native and resident of New York. He has received no letter from 
the Lieutenant Governor since he (Tryon) left London. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page and 1 line. 

Endorsed : — Gov r Tryon Bath, 19 Nov 1 ' 1774, Containing Intelligence 
from his Friend at N. Yort 



234 

Enclosure : — 

] to Governor Tryon. 

1774, October 5.— Extract of a letter from Neiv York to Governor 
William Try on. {Private and Confidential.) Haldimand 
going with the troops to Boston. Disturbance caused by the 
violent ones trying to prevent the carmen doing their duty, and 
intimidating the merchants. Drubbing received by M r Sears. 
Boston Resolves adopted by the Congress which also advises 
non-importation. Opposition it will cause. His opinion on 
the subject. The cloud to the eastward seems to thicken, and 
will, it is probable, break in thunder and lightning. Powder 
and arms in these ports bought up and carried eastward. By 
all accounts Boston and Connecticut will take up arms to oppose 
the Act taking place against the Charter of Massachusetts Bay. 
Opinion of the Connecticut people. 
In Try on 's hand. 4 folio pages. 

James Hutton to William Knox. 

1774, November 22. At night. King's Road, Chelsea. 
Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken). 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed;— W Hutton 22 Nov r 1774, relative to the Conduct of the 
Virginians towards the Moravians. 

Robert Hayne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, November 23. Shore Ditch. — On the subject of Judge Salter's 
effects, which he is sure were given up to the Board for his daughter, 
Mrs. Hayne. Schemes that have been carried on to wrong his wife. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Hayne 1774. 

Enclosure : — 

Mary Hayne to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, November 23. Shoreditch. — Petition. Behaviour of 
M r Cox concerning the ivill of her father, Richard Salter. 
Desires his Lordship will cause her property to be given up. 
Original signed. 1 folio page. 

Meeting of Peers. 

1774, November 23. — List of Peers iavited to a meeting at Lord 
Rochford's. Arranged alphabetically. 
3 J folio pages. 

Cutting from the Public Advertiser. 

1774, November 23.— No. 14,087. The Thoughts of a Traveller 
upon our American Disputes, Beginning — "By what Fatality has it 
happened, that this Nation has seldom been exempt from a Plot, 
Insurrection, Rebellion, or Revolution beyond a Space of thirty 
Years ? " 

\\ printed columns. 



235 

[1774, November 24.] — Another cutting, not dated, but containing 
The Thoughts of a Traveller upon our American Disputes, continued 
from the previous day ; and, on the back, An Observation on the 
Quebec Act, by Mr. Dickenson of Philadelphia, the celebrated Author 
of the Farmer's Letters. 

1 strip. 

William Smith to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, November 25. New York. — Resolution of his countrymen to 
appeal to the sword for the decision of the present controversy relating 
to taxes. Considers this was easy to be forseen from the spirit and 
commotions of 1766. Reasons why New York must be set down as 
ready to conspire with all the other colonies in every measure devised 
against the parliamentary claims. Plan concerted by the Leaders of the 
Committee of fifty-one constituted in May last. Determination in 
Maryland to tar and feather Governor Eden if he brought any tea ; 
assurances he had to give. Sees no alternative but a civil war. His 
sentiments on the subject, interview with Mr. White. 

Autograph letter signed, 5| quarto pages. Seal. 



Sir Stanier Porten to John Pownall. 

1774, November 30. Wednesday. St. James's. — Lord Rochford's 
readiness to meet the Committee of His Majesty's servants to-morrow 
evening. 

Autograph, third person. \ quarto page. 

Endorsed by Pownall : — In consequence of this Note M r Pownall has 
summoned a Cabinet for tomorrow Evening at Lord Rochford's 
Office. 



[From the Public Advertiser.] 

[1774, November.] — Newspaper cutting containing the Thoughts of 
a Traveller upon our American Disputes, signed Viator. 
1 strip. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 1. Westminster. — Intends sending his appointment 
for a Deputy or Deputies to St. Augustine, but not without his Lord- 
ship's knowledge and approbation. Speaks of enclosing the establishment 
of his two assistants in the General Survey, which he intends to send to 
Mr. Purcell in America. Reasons for sending it to Lord Dartmouth. 

Autograph letter signed. 1-J quarto pages. 



Chief Justice Daniel Horsmanden to Governor William 

Tryon. 

1774, December 3. New York. — Concludes this winter will be a very 
turbulent one. The Delegates have engaged in the non-importation, 
non-exportation and non-consumption scheme suggested by the 
Bostonians. Distress to which the people will be subjected. His 



236 

sentiments. Stoppage of salaries of officers of Government. Esteems 
Sir William Johnson's death a public loss. Irreparable loss of Doctor 
Ogilvie. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ large folio pages. With seal. 

Extract of the foregoing. 



Granville Sharp to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 4. Old Jewry. — Hopes his Lordship will avoid 
having any hand in promoting or executing the present measures 
against Americans. Has carefully and impartially examined the nature 
of the pretensions on this side the water and their legality. Tn a short 
time he will lay before him proofs in favour of the much injured 
Americans. Had the warning he sent Lord North three years ago 
concerning the African slave trade and maintenance of slavery been 
regarded he believes the present misunderstanding would not have 
happened. His motive for so writing. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— M r Sharp, 4- Dec r 1774. 

[Dr. Franklin.] 

[1774, December 6.] — " Hints for Conversation upon the Subject of 
Terms that may probably produce a Durable Union between Great 
Britain and her Colonies." [This is neither signed nor dated but by 
reference to Sparks's Life of Doctor Franklin (Vol. 5, page 12,) it is 
found that these Hints were produced by him to David Barclay and 
Doctor Fothergill on the 6th December 1774."] 

3^ folio pages. 

Endorsed :— Hin ts. 

Same as the foregoing but with corrections and interlineations by 
Lords Hyde and Dartmouth. 
4 quarto pages. 



William Smith to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, December 6. New York. — Assembly called together by 
Colden for 10th proximo. Opinion on the subject. Bad effect it will 
have. Clauses to be adopted in addresses to the King. Wishes Tryon 
were present. Considers it of the highest moment, that America be 
taught that her Congress is not infallible. Health of Colonel Fanning. 
Tryon's successor takes his departure this day. 

Autograph letter signed. 3^ quarto pages. Seal. 

Lieutenant Governor Cadwallader Colden to Governor 

William Tryon. 

1774, December 7. New York. — Rejoices that Tryon will be there 
in the spring to take the reins of Government. The present slate of 
the province is very much the same as when he left it. Proceedings 
of Congress disliked by a certain class of people Thinks the non- 



237 

importation association will only be kept in appearance. Is persuaded 
the Assembly summoned may do good ; they cannot make matters 
much worse. Disapproves of Mr. Antill's application for the Surveyor 
General's office. 

Letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Copy of the foregoing, lj folio pages. 



Mr. W[hite] to [Governor William Tryon]. 

1774, December 7. New York. — Considers Smith has given a pretty 
good idea of the proceedings of Congress. Declaration of some gentle- 
men of the Congress Committee that they would act no longer nor carry 
into execution the Resolves of which they so much disapproved. 
Sanguine disposition of Delegates. Duane a violent supporter of 
Congress. The resolve against using tea goes hard against the 
smugglers. Lament of their High Mightinesses. His sentiments. 
Congress is confident that the effect of the idea of non-exportation will 
make Britain tremble. Is surprised Cruger is likely to be elected for 
Bristol. Considers it wrong to withdraw the troops from here. 

Copy. Not signed. 5 folio pages. 

Endorsed (in Governor Tryon's hand) : — Copy of M r W. Letter. 



] to Charles Willi amos. 

1774, December 7. New York. — Desiring that James Savage's 
petition for a grant of land on the Westenhook may be dismissed. 
Extract. If folio pages. 

Endorsed: — New York 7 th dec ber 1774 extract of a letter to 
M r Williamos — relative to the Westenhook Patent. 



The Duke of Dorset to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 8. London. — Recommends Captain Stanton, who 
desires to be employed, should active measures be used to bring the 
Americans to obedience. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — D. of Dorset 8 Dec 1 " 1774, rec£ Cap. Stanton. 

Enclosure : — 

Captain John Stanton, 14th Regiment of Infantry, to 
Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 1. Dover. — Solicits his interest to obtain a 
majority in one of the regiments about to be raised in order to 
quell the rebellion. Expeditious mode of forming a corps. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



James Savage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 8. London. — Petition. Refers to a previous petition 
presented in September, describing the bounds and limits of certain land 



238 

in Albany and New York. Distress of settlers on that land. Begs his 
Lordship to use his influence on their behalf. 
Original signed. A folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Petition of James Savage concert Settlers in N. York. 
Ex. 

A. Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 9. Royal Hospital, Greenwich.— • On the subject 
of the enclosure. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Rev d M r Gordon 9 Dec 1 ' 1774 with a Petition for land 
in E. Florida. 

Enclosure : — 

The Reverend William Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, September 6. Mobile. — Memorial and Petition. Desires 
his Lordship will back his petition to the Lords of Traded for 
recommendation to His Majesty for a mandamus for 4 ,000 acres 
of land on the river Mobile. 

Original signed. 1^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Petition of the Rev d William Gordon. 

* See his petition under date of 6 September. 

John Crawfurd to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 10. Grafton Street. — Applies, on behalf of his 
brother, for the Government of East Florida, vacant by the reported 
death of Colonel Tonyn. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — J. Crawfurd Esq 1 ' 10 Dec 1 ' 1774. 

Mr. Watson to Lord Dartmocth. 

1774, December 10. Garlick Hill. — Thanks him for the information 
concerning the detention of the New York packet. Speaks of enclosing 
sheets containing thoughts upon the dispute between Great Britain and 
her Colonies ; desires they may not pass out of Dartmouth's hand. 

Autograph, third person. -§ quarto page. 

[Jonathan Sewall, Attorney General, Massachusetts,] to 
Governor Hutchinson. 

1774, December 11. — Extract of a letter from Boston to Governor 
Thomas Hutchinson. Believes the greater part of his countrymen to 
be well meaning deluded people ; despairs of them again becoming 
loyal subjects, until vigorous measures are taken to convince them of 
the impossibility of succeeding in a forcible opposition. Effect which a 
proclamation or manifesto would have. Presumes Martial Law will be 
next if there is sufficient force to execute it ; at present they have no law. 

1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter to Gov 1 ' Hutchinson (already 
copied). 



239 

John Florry to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 14. Cleoburynear Bewriley. — 'Reminds bis Lordship 
of an application he made to him twenty years ago. Money he laid out in 
this parish eleven years since, for articles which go to America. Mode of 
taxing the Americans. Encloses plan. Cannon balls and muskets he 
has invented. 

Autograph letter signed. 1£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — J. Florry Cleobury 14 Dec r 1774. Plan for America. 

Enclosure : — 

Plan for taxing Americans. 

MS. Not signed. (In Florry' s hand.) 2| folio pages. 

Excerpta from some private letters to Governor 

Hutchinson. 
1774, December 10-15. 

General Gage, December 15, 1774. — Thinks the Continental Congress 
will advise the Provincial Congress to usurp the Government. 
Sends to Lord D[artmouth] a printed extract of a letter said to 
be a performance of Dr. Franklin, and written to Cushing. " I 
mention another letter to his Lordship dated in September which 
Cushing talked of before M r Flucker and others as from D r 
Franklin and told the contents of it. I have not mentioned the 
Dr's. name as I could not prove it upon him ; but he's certainly 
capable of any mischief, and I believe the Author of the Disturbances 
in this Province, and, I may add now, of the Continent." Is told 
that the next meeting of the Congress may be earlier than February 
in order to nominate a governor, resume the old charter, and fly to 
arms immediately. 

Lieutenant Governor Oliver, December 10. — Provincial Congress at 
Cambridge. Delegates dropping off. Intelligence that has leaked 
out. Associations forming. 

Chief Justice Oliver, 14 December. — Attack upon a man for buying 
an ox from Councillor Thomas, and upon a constable for paying- 
taxes. Act relative to town meetings. 

Attorney General Jonathan Sewall, December 11. — For part duplicate 
see same date. Temper prevailing in this Kingdom. Public 
monies. 

Solicitor General Samuel Quincey, December 12. — Remarks made by 
a Delegate. Effect of a non-consumption agreement. 

Secretary Flucker, December 15. — Opposition of leaders from Boston. 
Movements of Sullivan, Adams and others. 

Colonel Brown, December 10. — Resolution of the people to persist in 
their rebellious enterprise. Division among Members of Provincial 
Congress. 

lOf folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Excerpta from some private Letters, addressed to 
Gov 1 * Hutchinson, from Boston in Dec 1 ' 1774. 

Lord Hardwicke to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 16. — Returns proceedings of the Congress ; his regret 
that it is so violently disposed, but he expected no better. The only power 



240 

reserved to the Legislature of Great Britain is regulating trade. No 
notice taken of the King in the whole transaction. 
Autograph, third person. \\ cctavo pages. 

Endorsed : — E. of Hardwicke 16 Dec r 1774. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 18. Friday evening. [Should be 16, the 18 th 
December was a Sunday.] — On the 10th there was a New York mail but 
not a syllable from General Gage. Letters from New York and 
Pennsylvania very barren of intelligence. Result of communicating 
contents of budget to Lord North. Arrival of dispatches this morning. 
Alarm and astonishment at the manner in which Gage writes, and the 
inactivity and irresolution of his conduct, steps to be taken in consequence. 
His Lordship desired to be in town. Pownall is at a loss to account for 
the strange conduct of General Gage, which seems devoid of sense and 
spirit. 

P.S. — Mr. Quincey is a strenuous actor and writer in support of 
rebellion . 

J utograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall 1774. 

William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 17. America Square, Crutched Friars. — States the 
writer of the enclosed letter [not identified] to be Speaker of the House 
of Assembly of Maryland and one of the Congress Delegates. Pleasure 
the letter has aiforded him. Reason for sending it to his Lordship. 
Molleson's regret concerning his letter to this gentleman. Death of the 
Collector of Customs for North Potoinack in Maryland. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :—W Molleson, 17 Dec r 1774. 

John Hanson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 1 8. New York. — Sacrifice he has made for the public 
good. Requests the place of Ranger of Woods in America, now vacant. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — M r Hanson, N. York 18 Dec 1 " 1774, desire the place 
of Ranger of the Woods. 



\-r> 



John Blackburne to [ ]. 

1774, December [?21] Wednesday, past 2 o'clock. — Resolution of 
the merchants and others concerned in the American commerce 
taken at their meeting this day. Petition to be drawn up stating the 
advantages of the trade to the Colonies, but interdicted from interfering 
with any political questions, or desiring any repeal of the laws. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Blackburne Dec r 1774. 

William Gerard de Braiim to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 21. Westminster. — The sum allowed to him has 
fallen short of the estimate. Memorial he encloses. The vessel not 



241 

commissioned. Letter he has written to Governor Tonyu. Orders he 
will be glad to receive Avith regard to his Lordship's territory in East 
Florida as yet not surveyed. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to Lord Dartmouth and to the Board of Trade. 

Desires that a further sum may be allowed him for astronomical 
and surveying instruments necessary in his department. 
Original signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Memorial of Will m Gerard De Brahm. 



American Congress to the King. 

[1774, received December 21.] — Petition.* Laying their grievances 
before the throne. 

Copy. \\\ folio pages. [The original petition is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 278, fo. 471.] 

Endorsed: — Petition of the American Congress to the King. Ex. 

* For a Note from Mr. Pownall on the 20th with reference to the Petition, see 
Lord Dartmouth's MSS. Eleventh Report, Appendix, Part V.. p. 372. 



William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, Wednesday, 5 o'clock [qy. 21 December]. America Square. — 
A large meeting of the merchants and others concerned in the American 
trade has been held this day — a petition to the House of Commons 
is to be prepared and a meeting to take place to-morrow. As his present 
situation makes caution necessary, desires to call upon his Lwrdship upon 
a different day to that set apart for his Lordship's levee. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 
Endorsed :—M? Molleson 1774. 



William Molleson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 21. Wednesday evening. — A meeting of North 
American merchants on Friday next. Promises that nothing on his 
part shall be wanting to confine their deliberations to commercial 
objects alone. 

Not autograph. In the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:— W Molleson 21 Dec 1 ' 1774. 



Robert Hunter to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 21. Wednesday. Coleman Street. — Concerning the 
prohibition of gunpowder and arms to North America. Desires to know 
if merchants trading to Canada would be allowed to export the usual 
quantities of those articles under such restrictions as Government might 
think necessary. If they are not allowed, a great part of their other 

y 82140. 



242 

orders for the manufactures of this country, teas and other East India 
goods will not, he apprehends, be executed. 
Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— My Hunter 21 Dec r 1774. 

Richard Jackson to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1774, December 21. — On the subject of the enclosure. Is satisfied the 
writer is one of the most discreet and best intentioned among the 
delegates. Thinks it must have been written since the dissolution of 
Congress otherwise it has been stopped in the office in America for two 
months. Pronounces it to be a letter from America at an interesting 
juncture. 

Autograph letter signed. l-§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — R d Jackson Esq 21 Dec 1 1774. 

Enclosure : — 

J[oseph] G-[ allow ay] to R[ichard] J[acsson]. 

1774, August 10. Trevose, Bucks [in Pennsylvania], — His 
indifference with respect to the grant of Vandalia. Sentime?its 
upon the interests of Great Britain and her colonies. Stands 
alone in his opinions. Measures that ivould have been advisable 
for the politicians to have pursued instead of passing the Stamp 
Act. Suggests that both Countries should retreat a little, and 
take other grounds. Disposition of the people. Congress of 
Delegates to take place in a few days at Philadelphia. At the 
earnest solicitations of the Assembly has consented to be one, but 
there is little prospect of his doing any good. Thanks him for 
his invitation to London. 
Copy. 6§ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from J.G\boAw\y to B.J. 
dated Trevose, Bucks, [in Pensylrania~\ Aug st \0 tn 1774. 

List of Letters. 

From Mr. Hunter, Mr. Molleson, Rd. Jackson etc. extending from 
12 March 1773 to 21 December 1774. With a brief note of the contents 
of each. 

2^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — List. 

John Blackburn to Mr. Brummell. 

1774, December 22. Scotland Yard. — Movements to prevent a 
meeting in which it is suspected that the late Sheriff Lee and his party 
are concerned in order to counteract the good designs of His Majesty's 
Ministers by a petition to Parliament. Efforts of Blackburn to prevent 
such meeting. Desires him to inform Lord North. Advertisement 
about to be inserted in the paper of the following day calling a meeting 
for 4 th January. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— -22<* Dec r 1774 M r Blackburn to M r Brummell. 



24 -; 

Monsieur Hocquart to j "Loud Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 22. a Paris, rue des Moulins butte, St. lloch. — 
Concerning his affairs pending before Council, one touching a seigneurie 
on Lake Champlain sold by him to the Seigneur Lotbihiere and the 
other concerning his post at the Gros Mecatinat. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 page. French, 

Endorsed : — Mons 1 ' Hocquart "R/ 7 Jauy 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

u Memoir e" on the subject. Monsieur Hocquart had acted as 
Intendant in Canada from the gear 1729. 
Printed. 3 \ quarto pages. 

Loud Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 24. Beckett. — " Our disputes with North America 
have not at present the foundation of Interest." Hints relative to the 
future Conduct of Administration with the Colonies. 

Autograph letter signed. 6^ quarto pages. 

The Earl of Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1 774, December 24. Williamsburg. — The Associations first in pari 
entered into by the Colony and adopted by the Continental Congress 
are now enforcing throughout the country with great vigour. A com- 
mittee is chosen in every county to carry the Association of the Congress 
into execution. They inspect the trade and correspondence of any 
merchant, watch the conduct of any inhabitant, may send for, catechize, 
and stigmatize him if he does not appear to follow the laws of their 
Congress. Every city besides is arming an independent Company to 
protect their Committees and to be employed against Government 
should occasion require. As to the power of Government which Lord 
Dartmouth in his letter of November 1 1th directs should be exerted to 
counteract the dangerous measures pursuing here, it is entirely dis- 
regarded if not wholly overturned. Not a Justice ol the Peace acts 
except as a Committee-man. Abolishing the Courts of Justice was the 
first step taken. The General Court is much the same, for the lawyers 
refuse to attend, nor would the people allow them. Interposition of 
Government in its present feeble state would only suffer the disgrace 
of a disappointment. But, he feels, every step taken by these infatuated 
people must defeat its own purpose. The non-importation and non- 
exportation agreements cannot fail in time to produce a scarcity which 
will ruin thousands of families, and as to manufactures here, the people 
of Virginia are not naturally industrious. The arbitrary proceedings of 
the Committees cannot likewise fail of raising quarrels and dissensions 
which will create partisans of Government. He is persuaded that this 
Colony by its own acts and deeds must be brought to see the necessity 
of dependence on the Mother Country and of embracing its authority. 

Extract. 9} folio pages. [The signed letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 21o, i'o. L3. J 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from the Earl of Dunmore to the Karl 
of Dartmouth dated 24 th Dec 1 ' 1774. 

Q 2 



244 

William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December [? 24]. Saturday, 6 o'clock. America Square. — 
Thanks his Lordship for his attention to his request. Report that 
Administration had determined to repeal the Acts and conciliate the 
differences. Letters received from America last night mention receipt 
of circular letters from his Lordship to all the Governors, requiring them 
to convene their Assemblies, and recommending them to lay their 
grievances before Parliament. Steps taken in consequence. Result of 
a meeting which he attended the previous evening. Petition drawn up. 

Autograph letter signed. 2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Molleson Dec r 1774. 



Ambrose Serle to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 27. — On the subject of the enclosure. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — A. Serle with Thoughts on America. Ex. 

Enclosure : — 

Sketch of an Essay on adjusting our Disputes with the Colonies. 
Under the three headings of I. Cunctation ; 2. Treaty ; 3. Com 
pulsion. 

In Serle' s hand. 1 7 folio pages, 



John Florry to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 29. Birmingham. — Friends are assisting him in 
publishing an answer to the letter directed to the people of England by 
the Americans. Considers the Americans would pay more regard to 
the merchants of England. Suggestion for a conference of the merchants 
of the seaport towns to agree upon a mode of taxation and settle rules 
of trade ; this he thinks will bring them to a submission sooner than 
any other method. American representatives in the English Parlia- 
ment should only be required to attend one year in seven. Wishes 
better laws were made for the recovery of debts due to the people 
of England in America. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Florry 29 Dec r 1774. 

Theophilus Hardenbrook to Governor William Tryon. 

1774, December 29. — Survey of the fireplace and chimney piece of 
the Council room at Fort George, New York, with plan of the fire- 
place. 

Original signed. If folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Theop. Hardenburgh. Report on Survey of the Fire at 
Fort George on y e 29 Dec r 1774. 

The Reverend Thomas Rankin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, December 29. Philadelphia. — Reasons for writing. Refers 
to a previous letter. Has seen his Lordship's letter to Mr. Flelcher in 



245 

which he mentions Captain Webb. Effect of religious work in the 
Colonies. Desirability of having a Bishop for North America. 
Observations upon what has come under his cognizance in the present 
situation of affairs. Nothing to be heard in some of the provinces, but 
warlike preparations. Melancholy prospect in religious matters as 
regards the Indians. .reefers to the battle fought between Lord 
Dunmore's rangers and the Indians near the Ohio. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 J folio pages. 

Endorsed :— Rev. M r Rankin Philadelphia Dec 1 ' 1774. 

William Molleson to Lord [Dartmouth]. 

1774, December 30. Friday, 3 o'clock. — Report that the American 
differences are settled, and Governor Pownall given as the author. 
Earnestly desires to know whether such report may be credited. 

Not autograph. In the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .•— W m Molleson Esq 1 ' 30 Dec r 3774. 

William Molleson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, Thursday, 4 o'clock [December]. America Square. — Authentic 
intelligence brought from Philadelphia the 7th October received by the 
New York mail this day. Non-importation agreement resolved upon 
by Congress. Disposition of the people in New York, Pennsylvania 
and the southern colonies for moderate measure. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— M r Molleson 1774. 

Various Papers on Measures for America and American 

P>usiness generally. 

N. D. [1774, qy. early in the year]. — Paper beginning " If the 
measures proposed in respect to the Town and People of Boston are 
adopted it will be necessary they should be accompanied with every 
precaution that may prevent or defeat resistance. It is therefore 
further proposed" — That the Battalions under orders for the relief in 
the spring should be sent out immediately. That the squadron in N° 
America under the command of Admiral Montague should be re- 
inforced with at least two ships. General Gage to be sent out with 
troops, and with instructions concerning the disposition of the whole 
force, to secure the effectual execution of the measures proposed. 
Instructions to the Admiral that no vessels load or unload in Boston 
Harbour without a particular authority from the Custom House. 

Not signed. In PownalVs hand, l^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — further proposals. 

N. D. [1774]. — List of business for the Committee. Amongst the 
business to be discussed are reports of the Board of Trade relative to 
some extraordinary proceedings of the Assembly of New York in 1772, 
to various memorials and petitions of John Gordon, Major-General 
Bradstreet, Monsieur Hocquart, Lieutenant Campbell, John Calef, and 
others. 

Not signed. 2^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — List of Committee Business. 



246 

N. I). [1774]. — Paper concerning the trial of military officers or men, 
engaged in the i'atal riots in the Colonies. That such military officers 
or men be sent home for trial. 

■Not signed. % quarto patfei 



N. D. [1774]. — Paper endorsed "Propositions.' ' It appears by the 
dispatches from General Gage and Admiral Graves dated in September, 
that at public meetings held in different parts of the Province reso- 
lutions had been passed by Delegates of Counties and Committees of 
Towns refusing compliance with the Acts of last Session relative to 
Massachusetts Bay ; that the people were excited to oppose the 
execution of those laws ; that representatives had been elected to meet 
in provincial Congress in Concord ; etc., etc. It is therefore proposed 
that a proclamation be issued, compelling them to desist, when they 
shall be pardoned. Advisability of laying the papers before Parliament 
in the first instance to move for leave to bring in a Bill reciting the 
Acts of treason and rebellion. Steps to be taken with regard to 
Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut and Rhode Island. 

4 folio pages. 



N. D. [1774]. — A Plan for allaying the present Complaints of the 
British American Colonies. And Plan of the Proportion of Repre- 
sentatives proposed to be allotted to the several British Islands and 
Provinces in America. 

Not signed. 2 Jorge folio pages. 



N. 1). [1774]. — Plan for indemnifying the East India Company for 
the loss sustained on such of the teas sent to America as have been 
destroyed there or returned to Europe, and for reducing our North 
American Colonies to a proper sense of their duty, without the effusion 
of blood, and without expense to the Mother Country. 

2\ pages. 

Endorsed : — Plan For bringing the Americans to reason & proper 
subjection to the British Government, For indemnifying the East 
India Company for its present Loss, and for creating a Fund to 
defray all the necessary Expence. 



N. D. [? 1774]. — Resolutions, probably of the House of Commons, 
with reference to the restoration of order and Government in Massa- 
chusetts Bay. That the law officers be appointed and removed by the 
authority of the Governor without the consent of the Council or 
assistants. That power be vested in the Governor to apprehend 
rioters, etc. That the Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of the 
Colony shall be members of the Council without being elected. That 
no town meeting be called without the Governor's consent. 

( \>pg . 3 fo Ho pages . 

En do rsed : — Resnl u tion s . 



IN". D. [1774]. — Memorandum in Lord Dartmouth's hand : " how is 
the Town of Boston assessed ? If the selectmen are not already 
empowered by law, direct them to call a Town meeting, & to levy the 



247 

money upon the Town, or upon such particular Persons as they shall find 
to have been guilty of the destruction of the Teas." 
§ quarto page. 

N". D. [? 1774].— Colonel Dalrymple. Report of the state of Trade, 
presented soon after his return to England, to the first Lord of the 
Treasury and Board of Trade. " The acquisition of Continental 
Territorys and Sugar Islands in America to Great Britain & the loss 
of them to France must naturally occasion such a change in the course 
of Trade as to require new regulations." 

Corrected Manuscript. L3 pages. 

Endorsed : — State of American Trade, and Plan for a free port at 
Dominica by Col. Dalrymple. 

N. D. [1774]. — Memorandum of business, in Lord Dartmouth's 
hand, "Mr. Watson — compensation for tea duty in America; Dr. Calef 
— the 12 townships " etc., etc. 

\ folio page. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Minutes in Lord Dartmouth's hand on American 
affairs. Mention made of the taking possession of the Castle of Boston. 
Supposes that the Governor of Rhode Island means to do his duty. 

1 folio page, 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Regulations humbly submitted to the Earl of Dart- 
* mouth for the better preventing the smuggling of tea by the French 
and Dutch into our American Colonies and the West Indies. 
Not signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed : — C — 26. Thoughts on the Prevention of Smuggling in 

America. 
Again Endorsed: — Cap n Farndborgh's Remarks on the E. In. 

Trade. 

-N. D. [1774]. — Paper beginning, " In order to judge of the propriety 
of the Measures which has been suggested, of opening a Channel 
of Communication and Consultation with America upon points that may 
lead to a Restoration of Harmony and good understanding by means of 
a Commission to be issued here, it will be necessary to consider 1st The 
Object of such a Commission, 2nd The Nature and Plan of it, as 
applying to that Object, 3rd The proposition to be brought forward in 
Negociation and Discussion as the Basis of Peace and Union." 

8f folio pages draft form . 

IS. J). [1774].— Paper headed " Proposal "— -" First. That immediate 
orders be sent to Governor Hutchinson directing that Himself and all 
other Officers, who are not obliged by Laws of the Colony to perforin 

their Functions at Boston, do, without Delay remove to such 

other place in the Colony " as Hutchinson shall think the least liable to 
be awed or influenced by the people of Boston, and that the General 
Court be held at such place. (2) Like orders to be setitj to the 
Commissioners of Customs. (3) Instructions for the Attorney and 
Solicitor General. 

2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Proposal. 



248 

Elias Durnford to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [? 1774]. Thursday noon. Bland Street. — Remarks on his 
plan to survey the province by dividing it into townships to be granted 
to certain persons. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Lieut. Gov 1 ' Durnford with a plan forW. Florida. 



John Gordon to the Board of Trade. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Sets forth a plan for the better collection of, and 
regulation in the reteipt of, the quit rents and casual revenue in 
America. 

Copy. Signed. 7 pages. [A duplicate of this is in the Public 
Record Office, Board of Trade, East Florida, Vol. 7, fo. 9.] 



John Gordon to Lord North. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Memorial. Refers to his memorial to the King 
desiring compensation in connection with the purchase of lands made 
by him and others in East Florida. Solicits his Lordship's protection 
and countenance. 

Manuscript. 1 page. 

Endorsed: — Copy of M r Gordons intended memorial with his Quit 
rent scheme. 

John Gordon to Lord [North]. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — With the exception of the first paragraph is the 
same as his letter to the Board of Trade. 
Letter signed. 11 pages. 
Endorsed: — Quit rent & Casual Revenue Scheme. 

[John Gordon] to Lord North. 

N. D. [? 1774].— Marked " Copy of a letter intended for my Lord 
North in order to get the Quit rent introduced to his Lordship." On 
the justice of his case. Is aware of the impracticability of obtaining a 
compensation out of funds appropriated for other purposes but can point 
out a way by which the American revenue may be greatly increased. 
Has committed his thoughts on this subject to paper in order to lay 
them before his Lordship. 

If pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of M r Gordon's intended letter with his Quit rent 
Scheme. 

John Gordon. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Accompt of Mr. Gordon's purchases of lands in 
East Florida for himself and other British subjects. 
% folio page. 
Endorsed : — N° 4. M r Gordon's Purchase E. Florida. Ex. 



249 

Lieutenant Governor Joseph Gorham to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1774]. — Memorial. Was employed from the year 1745, in 
the two last wars in North America, particularly at the sieges of 
Louisburg, Quebec and the Havannah. Sets forth his services. Result 
of his application for the Lieutenant Governorship of Halifax. His 
appointment as deputy superintendent of Indian affairs. His dismissal, 
and appointment to office as Lieutenant Governor of Placentia. Losses 
he sustained. Desires to be reinstated with regard to his salary. 

Not signed. 2 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — To the Right Hon ble the Earl of Dartmouth, one of 
His Majesty's Principal Secretarys of State, &c. &c. &c. The 
Memorial of Joseph Gorham, Lieu* Governor of His Majestys 
Town and Garrison of Placentia. 



Lieutenant Colonel Gorham. 

N. D. [1774]. — Minutes. Proposes that he be put on full pay as 
Lieutenant Colonel, and have the first vacancy that may occur in the 
American army. Desires he may be recommended for promotion. 
Conceives a corps may be raised under the denomination of Royal 
Defensible Americans. Reason for his brother, (a Colonel of militia, 
and one of the principal Magistrates in Barnstaple, Massachusetts Bay) 
being obliged to resign his posts. 

On a separate piece of paper is added a question by Lord Dartmouth 
as to what might reasonably be done for the Memorialist and PownalFa 
opinion in answer that he should have an allowance as Lieutenant 
Governor of Placentia. 

Not signed. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Lieut. Col° Gorhams Minutes. Proposalls &c. 

Robert Hayne to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1774].— On the subject of Judge Salter's will ; property to 
which Mrs. Hayne is entitled. Hopes his Lordship will allow his wife 
to give in her claim agreeable to her father's will. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — M rs Hayne. Ex. 

Enclosures : — 

Mary Hayne to the Kino. 

Petition. Sets forth her claim to the property of Judge Salter, 
her father. Desires His Majesty to procure the toill for her. 
Original. Not autograph. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — M rs Hayne 's Petition. 

John Salter, Lieutenant Colonel to the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards 
and Major General in the Army, to Mrs. Hayne. 

1774, July 2. Cannon Row. — The property of the late Judge 
Salter, and his having been desired to claim it. His refusal. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — A Coppy of General Salters Letter To 
M rs Hayne. 



250 



Governor Hutchinson. 



N. D. [? 1774 or 1775]. — Paper endorsed " Hints from Governor 
Hutchinson " consisting of two forms of an oath to be taken by jm 
inhabitant of any town in His Majesty's Dominions, (in America) of 



allegiance to the Kill!?. 



In Governor Hutchiiisoiis hand. 1 ^ octavo pages. 



[Governor H v tchjnson.] 

N. D. [? 1774 or 1775].— Heads of an Act and remarks thereon 
with the form of a declaration relinquishing all share or part in any 
association, confederacy or agreement for the non-importation of goods 
from Great Britain or for the non-exportation of goods to Great 
Britain &c. 

Tn Governor Hutchinson's Itand. 4 octavo pages. 



Lord Marchmont. 

1774. — Paper concerning America. The writer sets forth the pre- 
cautions he considers are necessary to allay the present animosities, to 
remove all suspicion of hostile intentions and every defect in the 
original constitution of the Colonies. Considerations upon the land 
forces to be kept in the " old Colonies." Is convinced they cannot 
have the face to ask a different constitution from that of the mother 
country. Plan for making their judges independent. 

Not signed. 2 pages. 

Endorsed: — 1774. L d Marchmont. 



New Hampshire. 

N. D. [1774]. — Reasons for a salary for the Chief Justice of New 
Hampshire since the Chief Justices of all the other Royal provinces in 
America are now provided with stipends to the amount of £500 to 
£1,000 per annum. _ 

4^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Reasons for Salary for Ch. Just, of New Hamp- 
shire. 



New Hampshire and Massachusetts Bay. 

N. D. [1774]. — Memorandum relating to certain offices in these 
Provinces. Begins, " A Commission for the Secretaryship, but the Office 
not to be Enter'd upon till the present possessor's decease or voluntary 
resignation." 

1| folio pages. 

Endorsed : —Mem, relative to certain Offices in New Hants & Mass. 
Bav. 



Royalist Militia. 

1774, — A Return of the New York Regiment of Militia whereof 
Leonard Lispenard Esquire is Colonel, Gerard G. Beckman, Lieu- 



tenant-Colonel, and Anthony Van Dam, Major, Signed Leonard 
Lispcnard. 

Original. J large folio pag e. 

Endorsed: — A Return of the New York Regiment of Militia 1774. 
Col° Lispenard. 



N. J). [? 1774].— Return of the Regiment of Militia in Suffolk County, 
under Colonel Piatt Conklin. 
2 folio pages. 



Lord North to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1774. Tuesday. Bushy Park. — Though General Gage's dispatches 
give ground for a reinforcement, they unfortunately demand such a 
one as the nation will not be able to furnish in less than a twelvemonth. 
Thinks it right that [Dartmouth] should bring the whole of his 
measures soon before the Cabinet, and North will reconsider his reasons 
dispassionately. Remarks upon the fresh difficulties of acting successfully 
with a land army. His wish to see some measure adopted which 
may prevent the bad effects which the too great appearance of lenity 
and concession may produce. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d North 1774. 



N. D. [1774]. — Draft of an Act for the more effectual Security 
of the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Dominions thereunto 
belonging. 

4^ folio pages. 

Endorsed (on a wrapper) : — Private. With Lord North's Compli- 
ments. 



[John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [? 1774]. Sunday evening. — Feels much anxiety on the 
following points,— final settlement of the arrangements for Quebec, state 
of Mosquito Shore, and dispatch of the " Scarborough " to General 
Gage with such orders as may be thought necessary or at least with 
intelligence of what has been done. 

Autograph. 1 quarto page. 

/indorsed : — Memorandum from J. P. 



John Pownall, 

N. D. [1774].— Notes in the hand of John Pownall. Marked " To 
be added to the Minute." The army under General Cage to be 
reinforced by three regiments of infantry and one of light dragoons ; 
reinforcement of marines to Admiral Graves. BHl to be moved for in 
Parliament to prohibit the associated Colonies from trading to any 
foreign ports, and from carrying on fishing in the American sens 
There are also two slips of Memoranda by Lord Dartmouth. 

1 folio page. 



252 

Mr. Renselaer. 

N. D. [1774]. — Paper endorsed " State of Mr. Renselaer's Title as 
well under the Patents of 1G85 & 1704, as under the confirmations in 
1717 & 1773." 

10 pages. 

George Reynolds to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [1774]. — Memorial. Desires to be appointed Chief Justice or 
Magistrate of such a court of Judicature as shall be established on the 
River Mississippi. 

Original signed. 1 \ large folio pages. 

Endorsed : — To the Right Honourable The Earl of Dartmouth The 
Memorial of George Reynolds Esq r . 

Proposals by Stephen Sayre. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — That every American colony should appoint one 
person, and the persons thus appointed meet at New York once a year, 
receive commissions and be formed into a Board of Trade to correspond 
with the Board of Trade here. Refers to the Indian trade and the 
settlement of boundary lines. The contributions of money from the 
colonies to be considered and organised by these commissioners, and 
their determinations, regulations, proposals &c. to be duly attended to 
and from time to time read in Parliament. 

Signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Sayre's proposal. 

Office of Secretary of State. 

N. D. [1774]. — Two papers — Establishment of the Office of Secre- 
tary of State and Account of the Salaries, Allowances, and Annual 
Expence of the Office. The Salary of the Secretary of State is put 
down at £1,850 per annum with deduction of fees and land tax at 4s. 
£797 14.?. Of the Under Secretaries John Pownall has £500 per aim. 
from the King with the fees of Under Secretary of State. A third paper 
contains a List of Messengers. 

Ambrose Serle. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Memorandum in the hand of Ambrose Serle, That 
the clause for enforcing the making good the damages to the India 
Company should be in a separate Bill, otherwise the whole might be 
deemed a Money Bill. That the ringleaders at the town-meeting should 
be declared incapable of holding any post of trust. An expedient 
should be thought of to enable the British subjects to recover their 
debts. 

1 quarto page and 2 lines. 

Endorsed : — Mem. 

1774. — Paper endorsed, in the hand of Ambrose Serle, •* Thoughts 
upon the Proceedings of the Congresses in 1774." It begins : " The 
Idea of subduing the New England Governments by a regular Plan of 
Military operation is in its nature absurd and improper — not practicable 
without an Army of 10,000 men or more. ,, 

4 folio pages. 



253 

Daniel Shaw, late Captain in the 62nd Regiment, to the King. 

N. D. [? 1774-5.1 — Proposal. To raise 300 men in 3 months time 
after his arrival in Scotland to serve in America or elsewhere 

I page- 
Endorsed: — Capt. Shaw's Proposal. 



Doctor James Smith to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [Beginning of 1774]. No. 3, Princes Court, Westminster. — 
It is with the utmost satisfaction the Americans see his Lordship at the 
head of the Board of Trade and Plantations. The colonies are daily 
undergoing a rapid change of circumstances. Submits the enclosed 
thoughts for his Lordship's consideration. w Many motives enjoin me 
to lay them at your Lordship's feet, that those who have the superior 
direction of affairs may be enabled to improve this vast dependant 
growing territory to the mutual peace, wealth and happiness of the 
whole Empire. If the contents of the enclosed sheets shall be 
favourably received, remedy evils or contribute to answer any salutary 
purpose they will give the highest satisfaction, to him, who has the 
honour to be. with the most profound respect. James Smith." 

Autograph letter signed. 2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — D r Smith Inclosing Thoughts on the Dispute between 
G. Britain and her Colonies. C — I. 

Enclosure : — 

Thoughts upon the dispute between Great Britain and her 
Colonies. \_A duplicate of this, sent on 4 July 1775, is stated 
to be by William Smith of New York. For the same paper 
with variations and omissions see infra 23 January 1775 under 
Brook Wat son. ~\ 

Not autograph. 9j pages. 

Endorsed: — Thoughts upon the Dispute between G. Britain 
and her Colonies. In a Letter from D r Smith without 
Date. In C-— 1. 



South Carolina. 

1774. — List of the Members of His Majesty's Council for South 
Carolina. 

Not signed. § folio page. 



Tea. 

N. D. [? 1774]. — Amount of Teas exported by the United East 
India Company for Boston, per ships " Beaver," " Dartmouth," and 
"Eleanor." Prime cost and charges to England £7,192. 5. 1. 
Packing and cartage on exportation £51. 19. 2 etc. The total amounts 
to £7,532. 19. 3. 

i page. 

Endorsed : — Amount of Teas sent to Boston. 

Again endorsed: — L d Gower M r Monk. Ex. 



254 

Captain Villeneukvl. 

N. 1). [? 1774]. — Memorandum concerning Captain Gedeon 
Villeneufve, possibly from his widow. " He Sail (1 from London in 
1770 in the Ship Amelia to Pheladelpha in America and sometimes 
from thence to Lisbon." 

Original. 1 quarto page, 

[ j to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774. — Letter not signed nor dated. " The Kings Stores should not 
be kept in the middle of a large Town and surrounded with wooden 
buildings.'' Considers the stores could be kept very securely on the 
Governor's Island and a few batteries on said Island would most 
effectually command the navigation of New York Harbour. 

1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Anon. N. York 1774. King's Stores. 

1774. — Volume entitled, " Transactions in America relative to the 
Boston Port Act, &c. in 1774," containing copies and abstracts of the 
correspondence between the Secretary of State and the various American 
Governors during that year. With an Appendix of some further letters 
and papers from General Gage, and an Index. [The original corre- 
spondence is in the Public Record Office.] 

Sound in red morocco, gilt, 9\" X 6£". Pages 1-523. 



The Honourable Oliver Delancy to Captain Oliver Delanc t, 
of the 17th Light Dragoons. 

1775, January 4. New York. — The heats are very violent, and if the 
forcible Councils persist, forsees horrid carnage and immediate ruin to 
America. Fears if New York breaks out it will be more violent than 
any other province. Hopes moderate measures will be taken by 
Parliament towards America. 

Extract certified by B. J. Johnson. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed .—Extract of a Letter from the Hon ble Oliver Delancey to 
Cap* Delancey N", York 4 Jan? 1775, respecting the Temper of 
People in N. York. 

Pierre Roubaud to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January 4. London. — Remarks on the importance of his 
enclosure. 

Autograph letter signed. \ quarto page. French. 

Endorsed: — London 4 Jan. 1775. Mons. Roubaud. Reed, the 
same day. 

Enclosure : — 

Pierre Roubaud-. Memoire sur Vamerique. On the present state 
of the American colonies — their desire for independence etc. 
Autograph. 10 large folio pages. French. 

Endorsed: — Memoire sur Vamerique. In M r Roubaud's of 
the 4 Jan. 1775. Rj Jan. 4, 1775. 



25* 

Extract of a Letter to Mr. William.**. 

J 775, J anuary 6. New York. — " In the ship Lady Gage, Capt. 
Messnard, were Imported 10 Chests of Arms, some Powder, &e. ; 
they were Shipped by Mr. Haley in London, Addressed to Walter 
frranklin here & upon Account of some persons in Connecticut." 
These arms were seized by a Custom House officer, who was attacked 
by some Sons of Liberty for so doing. Details and proceedings in the 
town owing to a threat to assassinate the Collector who is much esteemed 
by the majority of people here. 

1-J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter to M 1 ' Williams, dated N. York, 
6 Janry 1775. 



] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 8 — Letter not signed, beginning " The misrepresen- 
tations which universally prevail in this country, respecting American 
matters induce me to address your lordship at a time, that I should 
suppose the smallest information respecting these colonies would be 
acceptable." Assures him that the principal and leading people of 
America are much better affected towards Britain than the late reports 
represent, and that the conduct of the eastern provinces is held in the 
utmost detestation by the others. Remarks on proceedings respecting 
measures taken by Bostonians in consequence of the tea riots. Promises 
further intelligence if Lord Dartmouth will assure him his letters shall 
be kept secret. 

Original. 4 large folio pages. 

Endorsed .— Z. Y. X. 8 Jany 1775. 



Israel Matjduit to Lord North. 

1775, January 9. Clemens Lane. — When appointed, will wait upon 
his Lordship concerning Mr. Ruggles. 

Copy, In the third per son. \ folio page. 

Endorsed .—Copy of Note from M r Mauduit to Lord North, 9 th 

Jany 1775. 
Wrapper endorsed: — M r Mauduit's Extracts of Letters for Lord 

North. Jan. 1775. 

Enclosures : — 

Colonel Robinson [Robertson], Quarter Master General, America, 

to [Israel Mauduit]. 

1774, November 3. Boston. — Was summoned by General Gage in 
September to get cover for some troops. Narrates how he was 
stopped in providing quarters by an Edict issued by the Select 
Men and Committee of Correspondence and by the destruction 
of his materials. Under considerable difficulties he hopes 
however to have accomplished this work by yiext week. The 
four New England provinces are alike ill-disposed ; are numerous, 
perhaps 60,000 are armed ; the common wish the destruction of 
the army before the spring ; their Congress has appointed three 
scoundrels, fool is; k fell oivs. generals, a. committee to do the office 



256 

Enclosures — cont. 

of a governor and another to do that of the Judges. Advises 
stringent measures be taken with them and then other provinces 
will obey. Reminds him that his predictions last June or July 
are fulfilled and warns him against consequences that ivill 
ensue if his present advice is not acted upon. 
Extract. 4^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from Colo Robinson 
Q r Master General in America. In M r Mauduit' s of 9 th 
J anv Yl*lb. 

Brigadier Ruggles to Israel Mauduit. 

1774, October 16. Boston. — The friends of Government here have 
a full confidence in Lord North's measures, and that they will 
be quite sufficient to teach others their duty. Offers his services 
to enlist a number of the friends of Government for the present 
exigency if agreeable to his lordship's wishes. 
Extract. 1 1 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from Brigadier Ruggles to 
I. Mauduit. Boston \& h OcV 1774. In M r Mauduit's to 
L d North of 9 th Janv 1775. 

Intelligence from Boston. 

1774, November 2. — Extract of a Letter from Boston by the St. 
Lawrence Schooner. Has sent some of the latest neivspapers to 
show the progress made in rebellious designs. America is pre- 
paring for war and surprised at the apathy of Great Britain 
who may be assured that the longer the colonies are let alone the 
more difficult the contest will be. The desire for independence 
has spread over all the provinces, even parts of Nova Scotia are 
refractory . Only Canada is loyal and General Carleton has 
offered General Gage Canadians and Indians to assist if 
necessary. 

2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter from Boston by the St. 
Laurence Schooner. In M r Mauduit's to L d North of 9 th 
Jan* 1775. 

Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 10. London. — Remarks on the decrease of the 
Governor of South Carolina's salary owing to the Proclamation pro- 
hibiting grants of land and also owing to the late unhappy differences. 
Desires to be informed how to lay this case before him. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— L d W m Campbell 10 Jan? 1775. 

[PCorbyn] Morris to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 10. Story's Gate, Westminster. — Sends two copies of 
a plan for his own and Lord North's perusal only. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Cor. Morris Esq r with a plan for America 1775. 



257 

Enclosure : — 

Two copies of a paper headed " A Systematical Plan Submitted 
for the Conduct of Great Britain towards her North American 
Colonies particularly in the present Juncture" " It is pro- 
posed l m0 That his Majesty's Forces be withdrawn from 
Boston and immediately take possession of Long Island.'" 
Proposes also the fortification of Long Island and Rhode 
Island, and separate Independent Governments to be imme- 
diately constituted there by the authority of the British 
Legislature. Remarks on these proposals giving reasons for 
the same. Suggestions concerning several other provinces and 
u Final Remark " on the whole. 
3 large folio pages. 

Endorsed (both copies) : — A Systematical Plan jor the 
Conduct of Great Britain towards her North American 
Colonies. 

Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 11. Cavendish Square. — Sends a paper received 
yesterday from General Gage. The writer was Lieutenant- Colonel of 
Royal Highlanders in the last war, now settled in some North American 
province. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Barrington Jan? 1775 with a paper sent by Gen 1 
Gage. 

Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 11. Cavendish Square. — Considers it proper he 
should see the enclosed and states that the transport mentioned therein 
has arrived. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 4 lines. 

Endorsed: — Lord Barrington II th Jan^ 1775, inclosing Extract of 
a Letter from Gen 1 Gage, relative to the Supply of the Army with 
Necessaries. 

Enclosure : — 

Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to the Secretary at War 

[Lord Barrington]. 

1774, November 20. Boston. — " The Non- Importation Scheme 
having been adopted in the Colonies, fy this Port shut up, it 
has been judged expedient to fall upon some method to get the 
troops supplied with the necessaries they will probably be in 
want of in the Spring of the Year : " — M r Coffin having agreed 
to purchase at his own risk these necessaries if he could enter 
this port, Gage has ordered one of the transports to London to 
bring out the stores for the troops as this is allowable under the 
Boston Port Bill. 

Extract, 1^ quarto pages. 

Matthew Boulton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January 12. Soho, near Birmingham.— Relates proceedings 
of a meeting of Birmingham merchants dealing with America, setting 
y 82140. R 



258 

forth their distress and determination to petition Parliament for redress, 
notwithstanding remonstrances offered by Doctor Roebuck and himself 
against such an unwise action. Encloses queries respecting this, drawn 
up by Doctor Roebuck and himself after this meeting and seeks to show 
their commercial inconveniences are not so great as they represent. 
Autograph letter signed, 3J quarto pages. 

James Burrow to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, January 12. — Hopes his Lordship will confer with His Majesty 
on the enclosed paper. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal. ^ folio page. 

Endorsed : — J. Burrow's Memorial to H. M. on American Affairs 
12 Jan. 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

James Burrow to the King. 

Memorial, dated January 1775, with a postscript dated 12 
January. Submitting " cool dispassionate thoughts " en 
American affairs. These are followed by a draft of instruc- 
tions suitable to be given to a viceroy proposed to be sent to 
America to settle the disputes with that country. 
Original. 5f large folio pages. 

Nathaniel Walker to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January 12, Newman Street. — Has just arrived from New 
York. Assures him of the tranquillity of the provinces and contradicts 
from personal observation the accounts given in newspapers. The 
disturbances are entirely due to a few people from different provinces 
aiding the Bostonians. Reluctance shewn in giving help for the support 
of Boston. Seven vessels arrived at Bristol from America in the last 
few days laden with wheat and flour, and twenty more expected. The 
" Asia and " Scarborough " men of war had arrived at Boston, as also 
the " Mercury " packet at York. 

Autograph letter signed. (The signature is over a previously written 
name.) 2£ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r W r's Account of American Affairs. 12 Jan. 

1775. 

Minute of Cabinet. 

1775, January 13. — Held at Lord Rochford's office. Agreed to 
recommend to the King the reinforcement of General Gage's army 
from Ireland, and suggests the acceptance of Brigadier Ruggle's 
proposal to raise a corps of irregulars. The propriety of restricting the 
American commerce in consequence of the association of the General 
Congress. Advisability of sending Commissioners over to negotiate for 
union with the colonies for the mutual interest of both parties. 

Draft. 1 £ folio page. 

Endorsed : — D* of Minute. Ex. 

[ ] to Lord Dartmouth*. 

1775, January 13. — Letter signed Z Y X. Excuses himself from a 
personal interview. Informs him of the channel of nls intelligence and 



259 

the reasoDS for giving it. Considers a dutiful representation of the 
people and country necessary for his Lordship at this important juncture. 
Remarks on the disposition of the farmers. Seeks to show that the 
warlike preparations of the Bostonians are a delusion. Gives the 
general opinion concerning taxation, non-importation and troops. 
Autograph letter signed. Q\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Z. Y. X. on American Affairs. 13 th Jan r ^ 1775. 

Matthew Boulton to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, January 15. Soho. — Sends an advertisement forgotten to be 
enclosed in his last letter [of 12th], also another copy of his Queries, as 
the former one contained many errors. Assures him no branch of their 
manufactures will be so much affected by the Americans as the nail 
trade, and no part of the country will feel its effects so soon as his 
Lordship's own parish of Bromwich, from which place reliable 
information can easily be obtained. 

Autograph letter signed. \\ quarto page. 

Enclosures : — 

Newspaper Cutting containing two notices dated Birmingham and 
Dudley 9th and 7th January 1775 calling a meeting of the 
Merchants, Factors and Manufacturers interested in the trade 
to America to consider the discouraging state of that trade and 
the propriety of petitioning Parliament. 

1775, January 14. Birmingham. — Queries (12) on the propriety 
of Petitioning Parliament on the present interruption of 
American Commerce, 
3 \ large folio pages. 

Matthew Boulton to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, January 17. Birmingham. — With autograph draft of proposed 
petition to the House of Commons by the town of Birmingham. Has 
attended the meeting of merchants and endeavoured to prevent them 
petitioning Parliament at present but without success, so he and several 
others in the town considered it their duty " to sign and to promote the 
signing of a petition which tended 1 st to take off that stigma theirs 
would carry with it, and 2 dl y to promote Perminance in the execution 
of our Laws and consequently better security of their American Debts." 
Desires [Dartmouth's] opinion of this petition which is given at the 
end of the letter. 

Autograph tetter signed. 2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Boulton Jan y 1775. 

Fleet in North America. 

1775, January 17. Admiralty Office. — List of Ships and Vessels 
under the command of Vice-Admiral Samuel Graves. 
2 folio pages. 

Endorsed :— Adnity Office 17 th Jan 1 ? 1775. List of His Maj ts Ships 
and Vessels in North America under the Command of Vice Ad 1 
Graves, and of those proposed to be sent thither. 

r 2 



260 

Pierre Roubaud to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January 17. London. — Remarks on enclosure. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. French. 

Endorsed : — Londres 18 Jan 1 ? 1775 Mons r Roubaud. 

Enclosure : — 

Pierre Roubaud, Second " Memoir e sur Vamerique." Present 
state of America. Strength of the colonists. Best measures to 
be pursued at this critical juncture. 
Autograph. 9| folio pages. French. 

Endorsed: — Menioire 2 d sur l'Amerique par Mon r Roubaud. 
R/Jan. 18. 1775. 

Governor Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 18. Boston. — Disposition of the people cooling down. 
Influence of the press, which has been more open to Government than 
usual. Hoped to have procured an Association in this town but 
they hesitate to make open declaration until assured of England's 
resolve to pursue her measures. Thinks if the most obnoxious of the 
leaders were seized and pardon proclaimed for others, Government would 
come oft' victorious with less opposition than expected a few months 
since. People concerned in the rash action against Fort William are 
terrified at their conduct and seek pardon. 

Copy. 2\ folio pages. [The autograph signed letter is the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 1 30, fo. 143. J 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Hon ble Governor Gage to the 
Earl of Dartmouth dated Boston 18 th Jan? 1775. R/20 th Feb 1 *. 

Andrew Pepp. Sparhawk to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 18. Wednesday. — Having been long employed in 
service connected with the American timber, states his conviction that 
the important duty of Surveyor General to the Crown for the northern 
district cannot be properly fulfilled by the Governor of New Hampshire, 
as each office requires the time and attention of a separate person. 
Destruction of timber will not be suppressed while deputies are sent to 
attend to the business. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Sparhawk 18 Jan? 1775 American Timber. 

Sir Stanier Porten to Mr. Pownall. 

1775, January 19. Thursday morning, St. James's. — Sends a list of 
Peers invited by Lord Rochford to hear the King's speech at the 
opening of this session. 

Autograph letter in the third person. ^ quarto page, 

Granville Sharp to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 19. Old Jewry. — Has completed the work mentioned 
in a previous letter. Sends a copy of it. Hopes he will excuse it 



261 

being sent unbound as he was anxious it should arrive before the House 
of Lords met tomorrow. Beseeches him not to assist in enforcing the 
present measures against America. Believes his book, founded on 
authorities and facts, if read, will convince him of the error of so doing. 
Has sent a second copy for Lord North's perusal if desirable. 
Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r G. Sharpe 19 Jany 1775. American Measures. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 19. Bath. — Believes the Americans will not hence- 
forth accept Parliamentary taxation in any form, or consume any British 
articles even if forced to receive them. Cannot agree with his Lordship's 
idea of holding out the olive branch in one hand and the rod of chastise- 
ment in the other. Half measures will not do, delays still more dangerous. 
Advises removal of stumbling blocks, or vigorous measures. Thanks 
for public recognition of Colonel Fanning's and Mr. Sauthier's services. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 \ quarto pages. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 19. Bath. — Sends letters from New York which arc 
to be read with that caution expressed in the copy of a letter Lord 
Dartmouth kept back. Has heard by to-day's post from Captain 
Penderleath of the death of Mr. Benzel and Alexander Colden, which 
if true will make room for his friends. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 



Lieutenant Robert Tomlinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 20. 9 o'clock, evening. New Round Court, No. 4, Strand. 
— Details of conversation between English merchants and American and 
West Indian merchants who have lately petitioned Parliament, showing 
that such was only done to " preserve appearances, and to keep up a good 
understanding with their correspondents in America and the West 
Indies." Thought such an impartial, authentic and just account ought 
to be communicated to his Lordship as it differs so essentially from 
common report and the newspaper account of things. 

Autograph letter signed. 2£ quarto pages 

Endorsed: — Lieut* Tomlinson 20 Jan? 1775 Merch*' 3 Petition. 



Petition of Merchants. 

[1775, January 23.] — Heads of the Petition from the Merchant?, 
Traders and others, concerned in the North American Commerce, 
[presented to the House of Commons on this day]. That on the balance 
of the extensive commerce carried on with North America there is now 
due from the colonies to the city of London alone two millions sterling. 
That by the operation of various injurious Acts the minds of the people 
in the colonies are greatly disquieted, a total stop is put to the export 
trade, and that ruin and distress are before them. They crave an 
examination of the commercial policy previously maintained to the 



262 

happiness of both countries and that healing remedies should be applied 
to establish the commerce between them on a permanent foundation. 
If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Heads of the Amer n Merch ts Petition pres d 23 Jan. 
1775. 



Major Philip Skene to Lord North. 

1775, January 23. No. 48, Margaret Street, Cavendish Square. — 
Has seen General Howe, and finds it not impossible to prevail on this 
brave officer to serve under General Gage, second in command. Highly 
commends Howe, having served with him in many dangers and found 
him unsurpassed in activity, bravery and experience and beloved by the 
troops. Considers Haldimand will be useful to head the Germans. 
Thinks Chelsea out -pensioners are more fit for immediate service than 
recruits and they would inspire and assist the young soldiers. Proposes 
reinforcements from Ireland. Commends Colonel Ord for past services. 
Reminds him of Edward Coulthurst recommended by Lady Shelburne 
to be Lieutenant in the Navy. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Maj r Skene to Lord North. 

Brook Watson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 23. Garlick Hill. — Sends enclosure according to 
desire. 

Original. 3 lines. 

Endorsed : — M r Watson's Thoughts on American Affairs. 23 d JanT 

1775., 

Enclosure : — 

Thoughts upon the Dispute between Great Britain and her 
Colonies " sent to Lord Dartmouth by His Lordships 
Devoted Hble Serv* Brook Watson " 23 January 1775. 

[ This is a copy of William Smith's paper, with a few 
variations and some paragraphs omitted ; see the end of 1774.] 

In Watson's hand. 10 quarto pages. 

John Gordon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 24. Brompton Row. — Thanks for his attention to 
his affairs, thus enabling him to return to his family. Illness prevents 
him from personally attending to this business, so desires Mr. Elliot to 
ascertain when his reference and proposals can be laid before the Board 
of Trade and his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed:— M. r Gordon 24 Jany 1775. 

Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 30. Cavendish Square. — Gives strength of the force 
available for the present year leaving 12,000 men in Ireland and a 
small force to assist the civil magistrate. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 



263 



Enclosure : — 



State of the Force which may be collected in New England in 
1775. Total 10,819, leaving 5,359 in England and 1,893 in 
Scotland. 
1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — State of the Force, wch may be collected in New 
England in 1775. From Lord Barrington. 

Matthew Boulton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January 30. Soho. — Relative to the petition sent by Bir- 
mingham to the House of Commons concerning commerce. Sends a 
counterbalance which he has had printed in to-day's paper, the petition 
having been much misrepresented and abused. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Boulton 30 Jan? 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

Newspaper cutting headed Birmingham, January 30, consisting 
of an Extract of a Letter from London January 26 concerning 
their {Birmingham) petition and giving an exact copy to 
counterbalance the misrepresentations made. 

John Malcom to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, January 31. Westminster. — Desires him to read the enclosed 
papers and present them a second time to the King in hopes of obtaining 
some compensation for sufferings endured when Commissioner of 
Customs at Boston. 

Autograph letter signed. 2^ quarto pages. 

Enclosure : — 

John Malcom, Custom House Officer in the Boston Government 
in North America, to the King. 

1775, January 12. Westminster. — Petition. Relates his military 
services in the last two American wars especially in connection 
with Governor Tryon. Has commanded twelve different mer- 
chant vessels to different parts of the world and received four 
commissions in His Majesty's Customs. Details his recent 
sufferings at Boston. Has been seven months in London 
waiting for compensation. Desires £150 and the employment 
sought for in the Customs and promised by Lord North. 
Signed. 7 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — John Malcom true Copy of His Petition gave 
to His Majesty the 12 Day of Janv 1775 this gave to Lord 
Dartmouth to Prefer for me to His Majesty fyc. 

Annexed : — 

John Malcom to Lord North. 

1774, September 14. Westminster. — Desires various employments 
in the Customs at Falmouth, which he details, the salaries of 



264 

A nnexed— con t. 

the whole amounting to £200. Shows the necessity and utility 
of such appointments and hopes soon to obtain them and return 
to his family in America. 

Signed copy. 2f quarto pages. 

New York Assembly. 

1775, January 31. Assembly Chamber. — Two Motions passed; 
the first put by Col. Livingston, the second by Mr. Delancey. That 
a loyal petition be presented to the King, and that a representation 
and remonstrance be sent to the House of Lords and the House of 
Commons. 

Printed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — N. York Assembly. 



Lord William Campbell, Governor of South Carolina, 

to the King. 

N. D. [? 1775, January]. — Petition. Owing to the disturbances in 
the province no dependence can be placed on the Assembly for the 
£500 voted annually towards his salary ; the discontinuing the 
granting of lands deprives him of £1000 and the stagnation of trade of 
about £700. Desires a fixed salary to be paid by Government. 

Not signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — To the Kings most Excellent Majesty The Humble 
Petition of Lord William Campbell. 



Lord Dartmouth. 

N.D. [1775, January.] — Paper headed " Hints &c." being remarks 
on items 1 — 17 of Doctor Franklin's Hints for Conversation of 
-6 December 1774. 

Autograph. Two copies. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, January. — Has settled with Lord North that extracts only of 
such of Lord Dartmouth's letters as accompanied the Acts of last year, 
should be laid before Parliament. Military arrangements to complete 
the regiments for America. 

Autograph. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall Jan? 1775. Reinforcem* for Gen. Gage. 

] to Lord Dartmouth. 

N.D. [? 1775, January.] Friday midnight.— Signed Z. Y. X. The 
fourth letter. Encouraged by the approbation shown by his Lordship of 
his last two letters will continue to send information concerning 
American affairs. Remarks on the importation of wine and tea into 
the Colonies, the former from the Canaries, Madeira and Western 
Islands, Spain and Portugal, the latter from Holland. States tha 
Government is a great sufferer from this illicit trading. Desirability 



265 

of preventing it. Informs him on good authority that a cargo of 10,000/. 
value consisting of tea, wine, oil, etc. has been lately landed in one 
night in a principal seaport town in North America. Is concerned to 
find the misrepresentations of persons in America have influenced some 
of the leaders in this Kingdom. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Z. Y. X. on American Affairs. 

Doctor John Calef to Sir Francis Bernard. 

1775, February 1. Ipswich, New England. — Account of his visit, 
since his return from London, to Sagadahock, Deer Island and Fox 
Island, where he found great increase of settlers who now desire a 
separate Government. Introduces Mr. Parker who has several papers 
on the subject to show him. Details his persecutions on account of his 
loyalty to Government. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— D' Calef Feb. 1 1775. 

Doctor John Calef to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 1. Ipswich in New England. — If a confirmation of 
the Province grants to them should not take place at present, the people 
in the territory of Sagadahock desire a Resolve may be made securing 
their lands to them. As they are about 300 miles from the seat of 
Government they wish to be separated from Massachusetts Bay 
and formed into a separate government. Joseph Parker of London, 
his attorney, will communicate to his Lordship some papers respecting 
this country. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quaito pages. 

Endorsed : — D r Calef. N. Engl d . 1 Feb. 1775, respecting the 
Settlements in Sagadahoc, with sev 1 Papers. 

The " several Papers " here referred to are noted under their 
respective dates ; they are : — 

Doctor Calef to Sir Francis Bernard 1 February 1775. 

Sir Francis Bernard to Lord Dartmouth 18 April 1775. 

John Calef Memorial to the King. [? 1773]. 

List of the number of inhabitants settled on lands Eastwards of River 

Sagadahock. October 1773. 
Petition of Settlers of Southern Fox Island 25 November 1772. 
Authority to Doctor Calef to act as their agent 25 November 1772. 
Petition of Fox Island to the King 9 October 1772. 
Authority similar to the above „ „ „ 

>> » j> » »> >> >> 

A general account of the country eastward of Sagadahock River 
Oct. 1772. 

Lord Chatham's Bill. 

[1775, February 1. Presented to the House of Lords and rejected.] 
— A Provisional Act for settling the Troubles in America and asserting 
the supreme Legislative Authority and superintending Power of Great 
Britain over the Colonies. 

Manuscript. 7 large pages. 

Endorsed : — Lord Chatham's Bill. 



266 



New York. 



1775, February 1.. London. — A paper endorsed " State of Case 
between Daniel, William & Rebecca Coxe, John T. Kempe & Grace 
his Wife and Robert Lettis Hooper and others relative to Lands in 
N. York." Signed by John Coxe. 

7^ folio pages. 



Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 3. Cavendish Square. — Major Generals Howe, 
Clinton, and Burgoyne are appointed to serve under General Gage and 
have received the King's orders in the most becoming manner. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 6 lines. 

Endorsed: — L d Barrington 3 Feb? 1775. 



George Payne to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 5. — Desires him to second his application to Lord 
North for some appointment in the American Plan. 
Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — G. Payne Esq 1 " desiring employ m* in America. 



Doctor John Fothergill to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, [February] 6th instant. Harpur Street. — Regrets the failure 
of his negotiation owing to the Boston Port Bill and the Government 
of Massachusetts and Quebec Acts for " as a concession to pay a tax 
was the sine qua non on this side, so a rescinding of those Acts, or 
rather repealing them, is the term of reconciliation on the other." No 
permission had been given to him to raise hopes that the Acts would be 
repealed and nothing less would satisfy. If the whole of America were 
as sensible of the advantages of peace and as disposed to it as his Lord- 
ship, it would be soon accomplished, but the contrary is the case at 
present. If these Acts were repealed America would return to every 
just expression of duty. The party [Dr. Franklin] we conferred with 
would have no objection to petition for the restoration of peace, to 
offer on the part of Boston to pay the East India Company for the tea 
though at the risk of his own private fortune, and concert every means 
of a lasting and reciprocally beneficial union. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— D>' Fothergill 6 Feb? 1775. 



Lieutenant Governor William Bull to William Knox. 

1775, February 7. Charlestown. — Recommends to his notice the 
bearer of this, Mr. Johnston, Clerk of the Crown in South Carolina, 
who is well versed in American affairs. Fears Parliament is too 
sanguine concerning the likelihood of America acceding to its wishes, 
for she seems determined to persevere in her present plans unless the 
Boston and Revenue Acts are repealed. Remarks on provincial 
disputes. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 



267 

Stephen Fuller to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 7. — Informs his Lordship that the West India- 
Planters and Merchants have this day signed a Petition to the House 
of Lords. This petition is of the same tenor and purport as that to the 
House of Commons herein enclosed. 

Autograph letter in the third person. J folio pages. 

Endorsed :— St. Fuller Esq r 7 Feb? 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

The Planters of His Majesty's Sugar Colonies residing in Great 
Britain, and the Merchants of London trading to the said 
Colonies, Petition to the House of Commons. Inconveniences 
to commerce arising from the non-importation agreement of 
Congress. Hope measures will be taken to prevent further evils. 
Not signed. 3^ large folio pagss. 

David Ingersoll (of Great Barrington, Massachusetts Bay) to 

Lord Dartmouth. 

N.D. [1775, February 7.] — Memorial. Personal sufferings owing 
to his loyalty. Annexes narrative giving details. 
Original signed. 1 J folio pages. 

Endorsed; — Memorial of David Ingersoll Esq 1 ". 

Annexed: — 

1775, February 7. London. — Narrative of David Ingersoll. 
Attack on his house at Great Barrington in the early morning 
of 2 d August last ; ivas compelled by the mob to ride out fifteen 
miles to Canaan ichere under a Liberty pole he had to sign a 
declaration. Details his sufferings on account of his loyalty 
to Government, his escapes and application to Gen 1 Gage for 
protection. Seeks compensation for his losses. 
Autograph. 7 folio pages. 

Colonel W. Dalrymple to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 8. London. — Having been appointed Lieutenant 
Colonel to the 14th Regiment, asks how he can return to those troops 
he formerly commanded without some mark of favour for, his past 
honourable situation. Fears the disgrace that will attend him if he 
goes without this public recognition of past services. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Col. Dalrymple 8 Feb? 1775. 

Lord Hardwicke to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775. February 8. — With a memorandum on a separate paper relative 
to the Bill on American affairs. Time to be given to the non-rebellious 
colonies to recede from their non-importation and non-exportation agree- 
ments. Objection to the meeting of the Continental Congresfe without 
leave of the Crown. 

Autograph, 3 J note pages. - 

Endorsed; — E. of Hardwicke 8 Feb. 1775. 



268 

Richard Oswald to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 9. Achincrue near Ayr. — Having been a merchant 
in London for 29 years offers his Lordship the enclosed sentiments on 
the state of American commerce. Remarks on American affairs in 
general. 

Autograph letter signed. 6J quarto pages. [Letter and enclosure 
reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European 
Archives relating to America.] 

Endorsed: — Rich d Oswald 9 Febr 1775. 

On a wrapper is the following in Mr. Pownall's hand " The inclosed 
paper sets out awkwardly and the style is unpromising — but there is 
great knowledge of the Subject it treats of and a very uncommon 
precision and Acuteness in the reasoning & reflection upon the facts 
stated in respect to the Commerce & policy of Virginia. M r Oswald is 
a merchant of great Esteem & Credit. — Your Lordships Uncle had a great 
Confidence in his Integrity & ability & I believe consulted him much 
in matter of Commercial policy. Will it not be proper to answer his 
Letter & to encourage him to go on in what he has so ably begun ?" 

Enclosure : — 

Richard Oswald. Thoughts on the State of America. Suggestions 
on sending over a private agent to Virginia to endeavour to 
detatch it from the other provinces in acceding or cordially 
co-operating with them in the second intended Congress. 
Commercial difficulties. 
Autograph. 2\\ quarto pages. 
Endorsed : — Thoughts on the State of America. 

Parliament to the King. 

Three drafts for the address of the Houses of Parliament, separately 
and jointly. Not dated, but by reference to the Journals of the House 
believed to be that presented 9 February 1775. Concerning the un- 
dutiful conduct of Americans and desiring the King to take speedy 
measures to bring them to obedience. 

6*i pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra* of Address. 

Captain John Stanton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 9. Dover. — Laments the dreadful consequences that 
must ensue from the approaching contest. Offers his services, asking 
for the rank of a Major and command of a corps of Rangers in New 
England composed of ten companies taken from the Regiments quartered 
in that province. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Cap. Stanton 9 Feb? 1775. Ex. 

John Boyd to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 10. Grafton Street. — Expresses his gratitude for 
attention shown to his application and would be obliged if the affair 
could be finished before he goes out of town. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed:—!. Boyd Esq r 10 Feb? 1775. 



269 

Lord Hyde to Lord Howe. 

1775, February 10. Grosvenor Street. — "I feel, my dear Lord, y r 
friendship in taking much pains only from a word I dropped. I will 
not further trouble you now, but if I hear nothing to the contrary I 
will wait on you in my way to L d Dartmouth's where I am to be at 
eleven this morning. & shall wait to receive y r commands ab* imparting 
y r sentiments. " E r , my dear Lord most cordially y r 

u Grosvenor Street, 10 th Feb. 1775. Hyde." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. (The end of Lord Howe's 
letter of 29 June to Lord Hyde is written, apparently by mistake, on the 
back of this letter.) 

James Abercromby to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 13. Oxendon Street. — Recommending Mr. G. 
Corbin to be of the Council of Virginia. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Governor Peter Chester to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 13. Pensacola. — Sends by Mr. Hervey (son of the 
Bishop of Deny and nephew of the Earl of Bristol) some plants and 
tobacco grown in West Florida. Will be glad to be of any service to 
his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. I quarto page. 

Endorsed .—Pensacola 13 Feb? 1775. Gov r Chester. 

Major-General William Howe to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 13. Monday, 3 o'clock, Queen Street. — Since he 
had the honour of seeing His Lordship this morning, has been informed 
by Amherst of the state of the artillery now at Boston and considers it 
fully adequate to any service in America. 

Autograph letter signed, 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed .— Maj. Gen. Howe 13 Feb^ 1775. 

Major Philip Skene to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 13, Monday evening. No. 50, Margaret Street.— 
Thanks for obtaining for him the Lieutenant Governorship of Crown 
Point and Ticonderoga and place vacant by Mr. Benzell's death. Will 
go to America as soon as possible and there seek to show his gratitude 
by zealous service. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— Maj r Skene 13 Feby 1775. 

E. Vanderhorst to the Reverend Dr. Samuel Cooper, Boston, 
New England, per ship " Ann," Captain Forten, via Philadelphia. 

1775, February 16. Bristol. — Writes again to beseech him to 
exert his influence to prevent the horrors of a civil war in New 
England as it appears to be the intention of Government by oppression 

force America to commit some act of hostility and thus justify their 



270 

conduct. Seeks to show they had better bear the distress caused by 
nonimportation etc. than give cause for war or the accusation of 
being called rebels. Hopes they will adopt Lord Chatham's plan of 
reconciliation. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Intercepted Letter from M r Vanderhorst of Bristol to 
D r Cooper of New England, dated Sept. 1775. 

Plan of Conciliation and Union. 

[1775, February 16]. — "A Plan for a permanent Union between 
Great Britain and the Colonies " with Remarks. The plan begins 
" 1st. The Tea distroy'd to be paid for : And in order thit no time 
may be lost to begin the desirable Work of Conciliation, it is proposed 
that the Agent, in a Petition to the King should engage that the Tea 
distroy'd shall be paid for." [This paper is not signed nor dated but 
is found to be the same as that quoted in Sparks's Franklin, Vol. 5, 
p. 58, where Dr. Franklin in his Journal introduces it thus: — "I 
waited upon him [Mr. Barclay] the next morning, when he told me, 
that he had seen Lord Hyde, and had some further discourse with him 
on the Articles; that he thought himself now fully possessed of what 
would do in this business ; that he therefore wished another meeting 
with me and Dr. Fothergill, when he would endeavour to bring 
prepared a draft conformable chiefly to what had been proposed 
and conceded on both sides, with some propositions of his own. I 
readily agreed to the meeting, which was to be on Thursday evening, 
February 16 th . 

We met accordingly, when M r Barclay produced the following 
paper/'] 

6 J quarto pages. 

Philip Stephens to John Pownall. 

1775, February 17. Admiralty. — Has been informed that the 
" Falcon," sloop, has been driven back by contrary winds to St. Helens. 
Mentions this in case further dispatches were intended to go by her. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— Admty Office 17 th Feb? 1776. M r Stephens. J.P. 

Paul Wentworth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 18. Poland Street. — Received yesterday about 
12 o'clock a letter sent by an express which left Amsterdam last 
Monday, stating that three ships were in the Texel nearly ready to sail 
to America with warlike stores. Plan he has adopted to intercept 
them. 

Autograph letter signed, 6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — P. Wentworth Esq 1 " 18 Feby 1775, contains intelligence 
of vessels loads in Holland for America. 

The Earl op Hardwicke to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 19. St. James's Square. — Is told that Lord North 
is to move some very material motion relative to America tomorrow. 
Wishes it may bring about the end desired. 

Autograph letter signed, 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:—!*}, of Hardwicke 19 Feby 1775. 



271 

The Earl op Hardwicke to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 19. St. James's Square. — Thanks for the commu- 
nication of the intended resolution, will return it as soon as possible. 
Fears it will not forward conciliation with the colonies. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— E. of Hardwicke 19 Feb^ 1775. 



Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 20. Caroline Park. — Hearing that General Hodgson 
is dangerously ill asks him to interest Lord North on his behalf to 
obtain the Government of Fort George if a vacancy occurs, as he 
considers he has some natural claim to it. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed .•— S r Ad. Oughton Feb? 1775. 



House of Commons. 

N. D. [1775, February 20]. — Two drafts of a resolution of a 
Committee that it is their opinion that when any of the colonies are 
raising money to be disposed of by Parliament for the common defence 
of His Majesty's dominions, it will be proper to forbear in respect to such 
levying any duty or tax or to impose any further duty or tax excepting 
those expedient to impose for the regulation of commerce. Both drafts 
contain an interpolated paragraph in Dartmouth's hand. 

(Not dated, but by reference to the Commons' Journal it is found 
to have been proposed 20 February and passed 27 February 1 775.) 

1 \ pages eaeh. 

Endorsed : — Dra* of Resolution. 



Richard Oswald to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 21. Achincrue in Airshire, N. B. — Remarks on the 
enclosures. Has replied to the first and endeavoured to engage his 
friend on the side of moderation. His Lordship may see this answer if 
desired before it is sent to America. 

Autograph letter signed. 2| quarto pages. [Letter and enclosures 
reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European 
Archives relating to America.] 

Enclosures : — 

1775, January 4. — Extract of a letter from a friend in Charles- 
town [possibly Hy. Laurens"] to Richard Oswald. On the 
Wth instant there will be a meeting on this ground of Members 
elected in each district of the province, 120 in the whole, to 
nominate delegates for the second Congress to be held at Phila- 
delphia on 10 May next. The people are disposed to quietness 
and all the obedience that ought to be expected from them, 
provided they are reinstated in those rights and privileges they 
previously enjoyed. If this is denied, infinite trouble and 
distress must come to America and England. Personal losses 



272 

Enclosures— -cont . 

from the present state of affairs. The disposition of South 
Carolina is contrary to that shown by the Grand Juries there. 
2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter From Charlestown 4 Janry. 
1775. 

1775, February 21. — Richard Oswald. Memorandum with 
respect to South Carolina. A very long and closely written 
paper. Commercial difficulties in that Province, Suggests 
suitable measures to be taken with it. Remarks on Georgia. 
Autograph. 20\ quarto pages. 



Lord Dartmouth to Governor Francis Legge. 

1775, February 22. Whitehall.— No. 12. Remarks on the Bill to 
restrain the trade and prohibit the fisheries of the four New England 
provinces, also on a resolution on the further consideration of the 
American papers. Hopes that the firmness shown by Britain to preserve 
the colonies in a state of dependence tempered with that indulgence 
respecting taxation now held out will convince the Americans of the 
error of their conduct and restore public tranquillity. Grants Tonge 
leave of absence as desired. 

Duplicate letter signed. 3£ folio pages. 

Endorsed .-—No. 12. Lord Dartmouth's Letter Feb. 22 d 1775 
duplicate. 



Richard Oswald to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 22. Achincrue, Airshyre. — Sent, by yesterday's 
post, to his friend in London various papers — thinks his answer to his 
friend in Charlestown of some importance and has requested Mr. Herries 
to forward it to his Lordship without delay for his approbation. His 
own doubts of its propriety. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. [Reproduced in 
B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European Archives 
relating to America.] 



Colonel James Robertson to [ ]. 

1775, February 22. New York. — Has selected the papers that 
accompany this, that his correspondent may see the resolves and 
preparations for rebellion in their genuine colours. True disposition of 
the people. Advises that the leaders of the present troubles be punished 
and then order may be restored. Lord Barrington to be informed that 
the troops are well quartered at Boston in spite of the opposition of all 
the provinces and beyond the expectation of friends. 

Copy . 3 £ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Col. James Robertson, dated New 
York, 22 Feb^ 1775. 



273 

I8AAC ROYALL to LORD DARTMOUTH. 

1775, February £2. Medford. — Sends copy of a letter written in 
the previous year in which he requested Lord Dartmouth to use his 
influence and interest in behalf of the distressed Colonies. They contend 
for the restoration of their charter and constitutional rights. Hostile 
preparations made by Gage through all the provinces will he fears 
produce fatal consequences. Desires his interposition at this critical 
juncture. Excuses himself from public service on account of ill-health. 

Letter signed. 2^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Medford N. Eng d 1774 Anonymous, on Colony 
Affairs. 

Enclosure : — 

[Isaac Royall] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1774, January 18. Medford, New England. — Having been for 
30 years past in Assembly or Council, assures him of the 
loyalty of the people though they are zealous for their con- 
stitutional rights. Thinks if the Revenue Act were repealed and 
affairs part in the same situation as formerly, harmony would 
return between the two countries. Fears while animosities 
continue, France and Spain are triumphing and working 
secretly "in sowing and fomenting jealousies and divisions" 
between Britain and America. 

Copy not signed. 3 J large folio pages. 



Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 24. Cavendish Square. — The King seeming very 
desirous that General Gage should be directed to augment his force at 
Boston, desires him to confer with His Majesty respecting the regiments 
to be sent to assist Gage. Sends question he thinks should be decided 
by the Attorney and Solicitor General so that the military may know 
how to act towards the insurgents. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d Barrington 24 Feb. 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

Question to be sent to the Attorney and Solicitor General for 
their decision^ as to whether, in the present situation of Massa- 
chusetts, the troops may act, without direction from a civil 
magistrate, against persons unlawfully in arms in that province ', 
Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Hampshire. 
H quarto page. 



William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

177 [5], February 24. — Reports that the King's armed vessel the 
" Cherokee " ordered to attend him on the general surveys is floating 
in the river and despatching her rigging to sail as soon as ordered. 
Desires instructions. Remarks on his salary and the enclosed paper. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. Seal. 
j 82H0. S 



274 

Enclosure :— 

1775, February 18. — Observations on the transit of Saturn. 

Henry White to Goyernor William Tryon. 

1775, April [qy. should be February] 25. New York. — A vessel 
being now bound for Falmouth loaded with wheat by the writer he 
embraces the opportunity to send a sheet of the votes of the present 
sessions showing that the Assembly perseveres in discountenancing the 
measures of the Congress and refuses to send delegates there next 
May. The House is preparing the Petition to the King and 
Parliament, which he hopes will have a salutary effect on this country. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Henry White New York 25 feby 1775. Rec d 10 Ap 1 , 
d° Ans r . 

Enclosure : — 

New York General Assembly. Pages 43-46 of the printed 
Journal of Proceedings, 17 to 21 February, 

John Cambel to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 26. Brompton (Kent). — Mentions his introduction 
(by Governor Browne) to a Mr. Reynolds to whom he gave information 
respecting West Florida. Fears however from recent news that the 
Governor must have been greatly deceived in him and informs his 
Lordship of it to prevent imposition and exculpate himself from censure. 
Refers for his own character to several ordnance officers under whom 
he has served for fourteen years. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto 'pages. 

Endorsed : — Eng r Campbell concerns M r Reynholds. 

Richard Oswald to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, February 27, Achincrue. — Apologizes for the untidiness of his 
enclosure. Thinks there is a defect in the present mode of ascertaining 
the value of our exports and imports. Suggests method to remedy this. 
Hopes something will be done with South Carolina as it is in fault and 
capable of doing much harm to other provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. [Letter and enclosure 
reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European 
Archives relating to America.] 

Enclosure : — 

Sketch of a supposititious examination at the bar of the House \_of 
Commons~\, in Richard Oswald's hand. Explaining his com- 
mercial dealings with America. Remarks on their trade in 
general. 

26 \ folio pages. 

The Reverend Samuel Peters to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 27. Heralds Office — Relates his distresses owing to 
persecution by the people in Connecticut, whose Governor and civil 



275 

authority refused him the protection due to him. Desires some appoint- 
ment either in England, or in America among the Indians, by which he 
may be able to support his motherless family. Remarks on the dis- 
turbances in Connecticut and Lord North's motion for taxation. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Rev. M r Peters Feb? 27, 1775. 

Joseph Galloway. 

1775 March^e '• — Paper headed "Secret Intelligence" — being extracts 
•of Joseph Galloway's letter to Governor William Franklin, Philadelphia 
28 February, of Governor Franklin's answer, dated Perth Amboy 
12 March, and of a further communication from Galloway 26 March, 
dated from Trevose his country seat in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. 
28th February: — The people of this Province (Pennsylvania) are 
altering their sentiments and conduct with amazing rapidity. On the 
previous Thursday and Friday he spoke his sentiments in the Assembly 
without reserve censuring and condemning the measures of the Congress 
in everything. He stood single and unsupported. The opposition was 
violent and indecent but 14 members came over to him and they 
managed to postpone the debate to gain time to oppose the motion for 
presenting an Address to the King. Sends his pamphlet containing a 
Plan of Accommodation. Answer, 12th March: — The Assembly of his 
Province was precipitately hurried into an express approbation of the 
measures of the Congress. Details of the proceeding. Discusses the 
pamphlet. Mr. Galloway, 26 March : — A full account of the debates in 
his Assembly. As a specimen of the insults he has received, relates that 
a box was left at his lodgings containing a halter and a threatening 
letter. 

19^ folio pages. [A copy of this is in the Public Record Office, series 
America and West Indies, Vol. 195, fo. 233.] 

Endorsed: — Secret Intelligence. Correspondence between Gov 1 ' 
Franklin & M r Galloway in Feb. & March 1775. 

Sir William Hamilton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 28. Naples. — As it is reported that Lord Grantham 
will not stay long at Madrid, asks to be recommended to Lord North 
for that vacancy. Laments the sad state of American affairs, but 
admires his Lordship's firmness in the matter. Considers if there is war 
it will be owing to Lord Chatham's indiscreet action. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — S 1 ' W m Hamilton Naples March 1775. 

Remarks on Lord Chatham's Speech. 

1775, February.— " Lord Chatham observed on the first Day of the 
Meeting, that the Papers 'could not contain anything that was not of 
public Notoriety :" General condition of the American provinces. 
Proceedings in Boston. Mr. Ruggles proposes to raise a regiment from 
amongst the friends of Government there. States the disposition of the 
majority in New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, and the Southern 
Colonies respectively. 

4^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Remarks on Lord Chatham's Speech, &c. Feb. 1775. 

s 2 



276 

William Hey to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

N. D. [ 1775, February]. Tuesday morning. Jenny n Street. — Recom- 
mending Captain Hamilton of the 19th regiment to the office of 
Superintendent of a post at Detroit. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — M r Hey Feb? 1775, rece Capt. Hamilton. 

Sir James Adolphus Oughton to Lord Dartmouth. 

N. D. [? 1775, Februaiy]. — Sends a letter from his friend Captaiu 
Balfour. Other letters from Boston also state the violences committed 
by the people there who are disclaiming allegiance and preparing for 
action in the spring. Thinks the only alternative left is either to put 
the laws in execution by force of arms, or withdraw the troops entirely 
with every loyal subject and stop all communication and commerce with 
other countries until they return to obedience. States what he con- 
siders would be the result of the latter measure. 

Autograph letter signed. 2f quarto pages. 

Captain Thomas Webb to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March 1. New York. — Disposition of the people in America is 
more favourable than a few months ago. The measures of Congress 
being disapproved and rejected by the New York Assembly is one 
grand blow. Believes that if the King's standard were raised about 
three fourths of the people would join. It is suggested by some that 
shutting up the ports would soon bring them back to a proper obedience. 
The consequent] indigence and poverty would lead them to break 
through the resolves of Congress. Intends publishing some facts, 
relative to their* proceedings, in the form of an address to all the 
artificers and manufacturers in Great Britain showing that the true 
cause of the present disturbance is the restless spirit of independence. 
Has sent this pamphlet to Charles Wesley for revision. Encloses copy 
of a letter written to his brother. 

Autograph letter signed. 2| folio pages. 

Endorsed.— Cap. Webb N. York. I M ch 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

[Captain Thomas Webb] to his Brother. 

Laments the present condition of America. Surprised at the 
measures of Congress especially the defiant attack on the British 
Constitution and assuming to themselves a power of legislation 
upon democratical and republican principles. Suggests measures 
to be taken by loyal subjects to show their allegiance. 
Autograph copy. 4^ folio pages. 

[Henry White] to Governor William Tryon. 

1775, March 1. New York. — Since his letter of a few days previous, 
relates the further proceedings of the Assembly with regard to the 
Congress to be held next May. 

Autograph letter. With seal. l£ folio pages. 



277 

Sir Egerton Leigh to Lord Dartmouth. 

] 775, March 2. — Sends his memorial being unable to obtain access to 
his Lordship. Lord Grower recommended a memorial and promised to 
speak for him. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Memorial to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 2. Saville Row. — His late father was appointed 
Chief Justice of South Carolina in 1753. Relates his public 
services since 1755. Shows pecuniary losses since 1766 owing 
to the successful combinations of a powerful faction to whose 
insults he has also been subjected. His office as Surveyor 
General has been extinguished by the King's order respecting 
vacant lands and his health is much impaired by the climate. 
Seeks some office in any province north of Pennsylvania or 
other more suitable climate. 

Autograph, signed. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Memorial of S r Egerton Leigh Bar*- 

1775, March 2. — New York Gazetteer or Connecticut, Hudson's 
River, New Jersey and Quebec Weekly Advertiser, No. 98. 
Printed. 1 sheet = 4 pages. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1 775, March 2. Saville Bow. — Thanks for permission to remain in 
England till next May for the re-establishment of his health. 
Autograph letter signed, Y\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: —Gov. Tryon 2 March, 1775. 



Circular to Governors. 

1775, March [3]. Whitehall. — [Lord Dartmouth]. Circular to the 
Governors of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North and South Carolina, 
Georgia, Governor and Company of Connecticut and the Governor and 
Company of Bhode Island. Sending copy of a resolution of the House 
of Commons of 27 February to the effect that if any of the Provinces 
propose to make provision for contributing to the common defence and 
for the support of the Government and the administration of justice, no 
tax, duty, or assessment shall be there levied except any duties it may 
be expedient to levy or impose for the regulation of Commerce. Lord 
Dartmouth enlarges on the justice and moderation of the resolution, and 
on the King's sentiments and desire for reconciliation. 

15 folio pages. [Draft of this is in the Public Becord Office, series 
America and West Indies, Vol. 279, fo. 89.] 

Endorsed: — Draft of Circular incloss Besolution of H. of Commons 
March 1775. Ex. 



278 

Colonel William Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March 4. London. — Offers his services as Adjutant General for 
America should it be thought proper to make the appointment. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Col. Dalrymple 4 March 1775. 

Lieutenant General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 4. Boston. — No. 25. Transmits a paper of intelligence 
of the * Machinations and projects of these People." Will tell him 
later on the source of this intelligence. Account of search for artillery 
at Salem by Lieutenant Colonel Leslie. Indian affairs in the northern 
district are in an uncertain situation but no answers have been received 
to recent letters. 

Duplicate letter signed. 1| folio pages. [The originals of this and 
its enclosure are in the Public Record Office, series America and West 
Indies, Vol. 130, fos. 233 and 237.] 

Endorsed: — Duplicate of Gen 1 Gage's Letter of 4 th March, 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, February 24 to March 4. — Paper headed Intelligence. 
The Committee of Safety appointed by the Congress, consisting 
of Hancock, Warren, Church, Heath and Geary, is to observe 
the motions of the army and to communicate all intelligence to 
Colonel Ward etc. Expresses to be sent round the country to 
collect the Minute Men to oppose the troops. A Committee of 
Supply has been appointed to purchase military stores to be 
deposited at Concord and Worcester. Gives detailed account 
of further measures intended to be pursued by the Congress. 
6 2 folio pages. 

Colonel James Robertson to [ ]. 

1775, March 4. New York. — Placed in a scene which becomes every 
hour more interesting, thinks a short account would entertain him. The 
design of the authors of the Congress was solely to unite all the colonies in 
a war against the mother country. Preparations making for war in New 
England. Disposition and proceedings at New York. Arrival of two 
ships from England, but were not allowed to unload their goods. 
Proceedings of the faction in regard to this. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

John Fenton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March 5. Portsmouth. — Shews that the times are perilous and 
his situation becoming more difficult to maintain ; hopes however with 
the assistance of his two fellow members in the General Assembly for 
the county of Grafton to keep that district loyal. Fears he may not 
succeed and as Government servants have no refuge but Castle William 
and Mary suggests that it be better fortified and will gladly assist irr 
this work if agreeable to his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 



279 

Lord Townshend to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 5. Portman Square. — Highly recommends the petitioner 
for his past services in America and proposes that one of the little 
Governments of Posts now being made there, be given him. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Townshend 6 M ch 1775, with a memorial of B. 
Roche, Esq r . 

Enclosure : — 

Boyle Roche to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 2. — Memorial. Relates his past 24 years' services. 
Refers to Sir J. Amherst, General Monckton, General Howe 
and General Keppel for his military character. Desires 
appointment to some post if agreeable to his Lordship. 
Signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — The Memorial of Boyle Roche Esq r - 

Major [David] Hay. 

1775, March 6. — Memorandum concerning Major Hay. Details his 
services since 1745 — that he had served thirty years in the Royal 
Regiment of Artillery. Is perfectly acquainted with the Indians and 
prays he may be appointed Governor of Fort Detroit on Lake Erie, as 
he knows that country well. States the services rendered by his 
grandfather and father to their country and the losses sustained by 
them in consequence of the treatment of the rebels. 

3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Mem m concerning Major Hay. 

[Governor Jonathan Trumbull], on behalf of the Governor and 
Company of Connecticut, to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March [10]. Lebanon. — Expressing concern at the unhappy 
dissensions between the Colouies and Great Britain, the unfeigned 
loyalty and attachment of the colony but the unlimited powers lately 
claimed by the British Parliament have driven them to the borders of 
despair^ their concern and anxiety at the situation of the town of 
Boston, and recommending its case, which in effect is that of all 
the colonies, to Lord Dartmouth's candid attention and benevolent 
interposition. 

Not signed. 3 folio pages. 

Paul Wentworth to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 11. Poland Street. — Contains intelligence concerning 
the measures of the Dutch Government with reference to vessels 
carrying powder to St. Eustatius. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:—?. Wentworth Esq r 11 M ch 1775. 

Major Rogers to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March 13. — Desiring that his commission as Major of Rangers 
be renewed, as without it he cannot take that rank in the army. Gives 



280 

reasons that have prevented him making proper application before and 
considers he has more right to promotion than Lieutenant Colonel 
Gorham. 

Autograph letter in the third person, lj quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— Maj r Rogers 13 M ch 1775. 



Patrick Stuart to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 13. London. — On account of his thirty years' service 
in the navy and his brother John's recommendation desires a promotion 
when opportunity offers. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 large folio pages. 

Endorsed :— M r Pat. Stuart 13 M ch 1775. 



The Reverend Samuel Peters to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 14. Heralds' Office. — States the measures proposed by 
the loyalists as desirable to be taken with regard to Connecticut and 
Rhode Island at the present time, to establish peace in those two 
colonies. Gives names of those friendly to Government there. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 folio pages. 

Endorsed ;— Rev d M r Peters 14 M ch 1775. 



James Perry to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 15. Wolverhampton. — Is grieved to see the want of 
confidence between the Government and America and the discontent 
among English merchants. Shows the distressed situation of those 
engaged in the North American trade by the Prohibitory Act. Wishes 
the evil consequences could be mitigated by some power being invested 
in the respective Governors. Is still of opinion that force will never 
subdue America, but relaxation of laws and promised privileges may 
assist. Remarks on American shipping. 

Autograph letter signed. 5\ folio pages. Seal. 



William Lee to Josiah Quincey, Junior, Boston. 

1775, March 17. London. — Considers the enclosed should be 
published in all " y r " newspapers and communicated to those to whom 
it is addressed by every possible means. " It might be improved by 
introducing this sentiment, that the same principle which induces our 
Ministers to take the American mouey by violence from them, will in 
all probability soon operate on them to withhold the Soldiers poor 
pittance of pay." Dr. Franklin about to depart for Philadelphia. 
" You have the whole ministerial plan of despotism before you .... 
For my own part rather than submit to so infamous a system I would 
suffer every earthly evil & dye on the la*t mountain in America." 
Vote of £500 granted by Bill of Rights Society, for sufferers in 
Boston, and fishermen of New England. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken). 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Josiah Quincey landed at Marblehead and died a few 
days after. 



281 



Enclosures ;«— 



Printed circular signed D. Smith, " Sir, You are desired to be 
at a Court of Common- Council at Guildhall on Tuesday next, 
being the 14th Dag of March, 1775, at Ten o' Clock in the 
Forenoon. D. Smith. N.B. — To consider of a Petition to the 
House of Lords against an unjust and inhuman Bill, which 
has passed the House of Commons, intitled, ' A Bill to restrain 
the Trade and Commerce of the Province of Massachusetts 
Bay, Sfc* The Lord Mayor will take the Chair at Eleven 
precisely." {At the foot in William Lee's writing} — " In 
consequence of this Summons, the Corporation drew up and 
presented a strong petition to the House of Lords, which with 
the resolution of the Bill of Rights Society shows the disposition 
of the people of London with respect to America more strongly 
than any thing I can say." 
1 quarto page. 

Printed address to the Soldiers signed " An Old Soldier " and 
beginning " Gentlemen, You are about to embark for America, 
to compel your Fellow Subjects there to submit to Popery and 
Slavery. It is the Glory of the British Soldier, that he is the 
Defender, not the Destroyer, of the Civil and Religious Rights 
of the People." Reminds them of James II., and of his seizure 
of the seven bishops. Assures them that the Americans in their 
efforts to obtain redress of their Grievances, are right before 
God and man, and that their honour as Gentlemen and soldieis 
forbids them to be the instruments of forcing chains upon their 
injured fellow subjects. 

Note in William Lee's writing at the foot of document. li This 
has been sent to Ireland to be published there. "I 

London March 1775." J 
1 page. 

New York General Assembly to the King. 

1 775, March 25. Assembly Chambers, City of New York. — Petition. 
Signed, by order of the General Assembly, John Cruger, Speaker. Stating 
their grievances as to taxation, representation, and the various Acts 
imposing duties on articles of commerce, shutting the port of Boston, 
etc. etc., and desiring redress and such a system of Government con- 
firmed by His Majesty as will ascertain and limit the authority claimed 
by the British legislature. 

Original. 6| large pages. [A printed copy of this and the following 
to the Lords is in the Public Record Office, Board of Trade, New York, 
Vol. 109, No. 3.] 

Copy of the foregoing. 

New York General Assembly to the Holse of Lords. 

1775, March 25. Assembly Chamber, City of New York. — Memorial. 
Signed by John Cruger, Speaker. While acknowledging themselves 
bound by ties of faith & allegiance to the King and considering 
themselves, with England, parts of one great empire, declare them- 
selves entitled to equal rights and privileges with their fellow subjects in 



282 

Great Britain. Enumerate their grievances, such as the duties levied 
without their consent, the Jurisdiction of the Admiralty Courts, the 
shutting of the Port of Boston, etc., and appeal to their Lordships 
to aid and concur in redressing these grievances and to remove all 
causes of dissension. 

Original. 5f large pages. 

Copy of the foregoing. 



Lord Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 28. Cavendish Square. — Desires that the Major 
Generals proceeding to America may take with them definite instruc- 
tions respecting their conduct towards the insurgents in New England. 
Has the greatest confidence in General Gage and encloses extract of a 
letter received yesterday from him. 

Autograph letter signed, 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Barrington 28 March 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

[Lieutenant General Gage] to [Lord Barrington]. 

[1775, February 10], — Fears Lord Barrington flatters him in 
the approbation of his conduct. Has done his utmost to remove 
the prejudices of the people and baffle the projects of the hoi- 
headed leaders of the opposition, and partly succeeded. Waits 
with impatience for further orders as offensive measures are 
becoming necessary and doubtless will be included in his next 
instructions. 

Extract in Harrington's hand. 1 quarto page. 

John Fenton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 29. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. — Since his letter of 
5 March has heard that Captain Cochran (provincial officer of Castle 
William and Mary) has an appointment of ten shillings per day — does 
not wish to iuterfere with him, but would gladly serve in the establish- 
ment of that fort or any other employment. Gives his past military 
services as an excuse for the present intrusion on his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Fenton Portsmouth N. Hamp. 5. 29 M ch 1775, 
respecting Capt. Cochran &c. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, March 29. On board the Britannia and Florida, St. John 
River. — No. 7. Private. Remarks on enclosures which are fees charged 
for running the three tracts of hind belonging to his Lordship's 
family. Will give a full description of them when he returns to- 
St. Augustine. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Tonyn. 



283 

Enclosures : — 

East Florida. 

Frederick George Mulcaster. A/c of Fees for running a tract 
of 20,000 acres belonging to the Honourable Heneage Legge 
amounting to £88. 6. 7 the survey charged at 4/6 per hundred. 
Another for the Honourable Charles Legge for the same number 

' of acres amounts to £87. 9. 3, and a third for the Honourable 
William Legge to £87. 6. 7. 

Signed, f folio page respectively. 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, February 20. St. Augustine. — N° 6. Private. Gives his 
reasons for having made so urgent a request to the Board 
of Ordnance for stores — perceives his error and apologizes 
for it. 

Duplicate autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. \_The 
original letter is in the Public Record Office, series America 
and West Indies, Vol. 245, fo. 115.] 

] to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

[1775], March 29. Wednesday. — Letter not signed nor addressed, 
possibly from a secretary. " Agreeable to the Advice weh your Lord- 
ship was pleased to Give me on the 8th February last I have repeatedly 
seen Sir George Savile " : — Has been unsuccessful in his interview with 
Lord Rockingham respecting New Hampshire business. Observations 
respecting the secretaryship of New Hants ; disputes with Governor 
Wentworth regarding Mr. Green and Mr. King who are seeking this 
office in consequence of the age and infirmities of Mr. Atkinson who 
now fills it. 

3^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Case of M r Green. 

Cabinet Minute. 

,1775, March 30. — In Lord Dartmouth's hand. It is agreed to 
recommend to the King that a Commission under the Great Seal be 
given to the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay. That Governor to 
be empowered to issue a Proclamation offering pardon to rebels who 
shall surrender within a certain time, except those concerned in the 
late Provincial Congress or who have made any attack on His Majesty's 
forts or ships. 

Accompanying this is a memorandum also in Lord Dartmouth's hand, 
not dated, but endorsed " 1775. Memorandum. From the King." — 
" The King was pleased to say that there is nothing he more earnestly 
desires than to remove the Jealousies and quiet the Apprehensions of 
his American Subjects & to see them reconciled to British Government 
upon principles that may secure the permanent peace and tranquility 
of the British Empire ; that he considers it as his first duty to maintain 
& support the rights of the Constitution of Great Britain and that he 
shall always be ready to concur with his Parliament in taking such 
measures for these purposes, as the situation of America & the con- 
dition of his Subjects there may require." 

] ^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Minute of Cabinet, 30 th March, 1775. 



284 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, March 30. Philadelphia. — A report prevails here that the un- 
happy dispute between England and America will shortly be settled. 
Lord North has " declared himself not to have been the Author of those 
Acts relative to Boston, and that he will give up the Authors &c." 
Is assured the Americans will never be a happy people unless some 
constitutional line is drawn between Great Britain and them. " It will 
not be fifty years before we shall be at intestine wars among ourselves as 
this contiuent seems now to swarm with inhabitants." 

Extract. Intercepted. ^ folio page. 

Endorsed :-~ Philadelphia, March 30, 1775. Extract of a Letter 
from Thomas Wharton, to Samuel Wharton Esq 1 . 



Thomas Parker to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March 31. Lincolns Inn. — Suggests means of raising the pro- 
portion of the expenses of Government from the subjects in America and 
so obviate the difficulties that attend the "present mode of taxation. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Tho. Parker 31 March 1775. 



Colonel Philip Skene and the Reverend John Vardill to 

[Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, March. — Soliciting his attention to the case of the Presbyterian 
Churches of New York. Endorse the opinion of their fellow citizens of 
New York in their desire for the charters solicited by them, as they 
only ask these for toleration in religious matters. Shew how beneficial 
such would be, by quoting extracts from D r Chandler to M r Vardill, 
dated 27 September 1774 and 2 January 1775. It would be policy to 
grant this request as it would tend to allay the jealousies they entertain 
of the Church of England and lead them to co-operate more zealously 
in support of Government. 

Letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Col. Skene & M r Vardill March 1775. 



Intelligence from America. 

N. D. [1775, March]. — Copy of an intercepted letter or part of a 
letter. Not signed, dated, nor addressed. " I was told by a Gentleman 
on whose Veracity I can entirely rely, that he was in company the 
Night before they went to the Provincial Congress with Mess rs Hopkins 
& Sessions whom the Rhode Islanders sent to the Congress." These 
men are of opinion that it was impracticable to raise an Army as they 
lack money and resources and were in every sense totally unable to 
contend with Great Britain. M r Hopkins was informed that M r Dalton 
of Newbury had declared openly at the Congress against hostilities and 
was much distressed at the despairing appearance of the people at Salem. 
Humourous scenes enacted by the military actors. Remarks on the 
adjournment of the Connecticut Assembly. Starvation and ruin seem 
inevitable in America. 
3 folio pages. 



285 

Restraining Act. 

N. D. [1775, March.] — Draught of a Bill to restrain the Trade 
and Commerce of certain Provinces in North America therein mentioned 
to Great Britain, Ireland and the British Islands in the West Indies for 
a limited time. 

36 pages. 

Lord Barrington to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, April I. Cavendish Square. — Cannot make the enclosed ,any 
plainer so sends another copy. Is still of the opinion that the Habeas 
Corpus Act should be suspended in New England and persons taken 
up in America for high treason be brought to this country for trial. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Barrington 1 April 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

Question as to whether, in the present situation of Massachusetts 
Bay the troops may act against persons in Arms, without any 
direction from a civil magistrate. \_See 24 February~\. 
\ quarto page. 

Henry Cruger to Henry Cruger, Junior. 

1775, April 4. New York.— The Assembly is adjourned for a month 
to prevent the troublesome party from endeavouring to consider the 
proceedings of the Continental Congress. The legislature have passed 
this session a Bill entitled " An Act to regulate Elections for Represen- 
tatives in the City and County of Albany," and it is hoped the King 
will give his assent. Cannot descant on political affairs for fear of 
letters miscarrying. 

Extract. Intercepted. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter from Henry Cruger Esq 1 to his 
Son Henry Cruger Esq r . 

Robert Ray to J. H. Chabanel, Amsterdam. 

1775, April 4 and 29. New York. — Addressed to the care of Chabanel, 
Uhthoff & Co. London, 29 April, preceded by copy of a previous letter 
of 4 April. The articles shipped for him on 1 November have arrived 
in the West Indies. Requests that the others ordered and unshipped 
may not be sent on any account as the port is shut up and all men are 
busy preparing for war. The people are united in New York and 
determined to die or be free. The sword is drawn at Boston between 
the King's troops and the inhabitants, 500 of the former being 
killed. 

14 folio pages. Intercepted. 

Endorsed: — New York, April 29, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Robert Ray, to M r J. H. Chabanel Amsterdam. 

Sir Jeffery Amherst to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 5. Wednesday, 7 o'clock. Whitehall. — Sends the 
enclosed list to which may be added six light three-pounders ordered to 



286 

be shipped for Boston. His Lordship will thus see that the artillery 
is more than the troops can use for the present service there. 
Autograph letter. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — S r Jeffery Amher6t 5 April 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

List of the Artillery in North America. 

In Sir Jeffery Amherst's hand. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Artillery in North America 6 April 177 5. 



Lord Barrington to Lord Dartjiouth. 

1775, April 5. Cavendish Square. — This Bill "will probably come up 
to the House of Lords today or tomorrow ; it has met with no opposition 
in the House of Commons. The only part fresh to the Americans is 
the clause enclosed, and that is contained in an Act of Parliament now 
in force in Europe. The Admiralty have added a clause respecting the 
marines. 

Autograph letter in the third person, 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — L d Barrington 5 April 1775. American Mutiny Act. 

^Enclosure : — 

Clause of the American Mutiny Act, 
5 folio pages and 2 lines. 

Endorsed : — Clause For punishing , Persons icho shall persuade 
Soldiers to desert. 



Sir George Collier to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 5. Southampton Street. — Desires to bere-imbursed £737 
expended on public service. His circumstances will not permit him 
to make a present of it to Government. That they could not determine 
out of what fund it should come is no reason why Lords North and 
Hillsborough should not meet his demands. A twenty gun ship is just 
ordered to take the three generals to America and Captain Chads who 
commands her has been reimbursed £400 out of the contingencies of the 
army. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :—-S r G> Collier 5 April 1775 incloss his Case. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, April. — Case for Lord Dartmouth's consideration. Details 
his services in connection with the taking of the Earl of 
Dunmore and family to New York in the " Ticeed" man of 
war. Expenses incurred by delay. Dangers and difficulties 
experienced during November and December on the sea, and the 
return journey with Lady Bernard and family on board. Shows 
his just claims for £737 thus expended. 
Autograph not signed* 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Case for L d Dartmouth 's consideration. 



287 

John Cbugeb, James Jauncey, Jacob Walton, and James 
Delancey to Edmund Bubke. 

1775, April 5. New York. — " Your Letter of the 3 d January was 
received while the House was sitting & immediately laid before them." 
Duplicates of the petition to the King, Memorial to the Lords and 
Representation and Remonstrance to the Commons are sent by this 
packet and it is hoped they will be attended to. Desires he will use his 
endeavours to get the two following Acts confirmed " An Act to 
regulate Elections for Representatives in General Assembly for the City 
& County of Albany," and an Act for the general Quiet of His Majesty's 
subjects in this Colouy against all pretences of Concealment whatsoever." 
Hopes he will communicate by the first opportunity any measures likely 
to be pursued in regard to the Colonies. 

Copy* Intercepted. If folio pages. 

Endorsed : — New York, April 5, 1775. Copy of a Letter from John 
Cruger, Ja s Jauncey, Jacob Walton and James De Lancey to 
Edmund Burke Esq r . 

1775, April 6. — Duplicate of the enclosure in Amherst's letter of the 
5 th . List of Artillery, etc. 

The Eabl of Galloway to [Lobd Dabtmouth]. 

1775, April 6. Charles Street, St. James's. — Having had repeated 
and authentic information of the distressed state of many of the poor 
emigrants in America, and as many are now anxious to return to their 
native country but are prevented by poverty he represented their sad 
condition to Lord Sandwich suggesting that the transports taking troops 
to Boston could bring these people back. His Lordship agreed to this 
proposal, provided Lord Dartmouth gave the necessary orders to the 
Governors of the respective provinces to make arrangements for the 
journey. Hopes this will meet with his Lordship's approbation. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

E?idorsed:—Jfi. of Galloway Apr 1 1775. 

A. Peppebbell to Lobd Dartmouth. 

1775, April 9. — Draws his attention to the distressed situation of 
several friends to Government (especially M r Ingersoll) as shown in 
the paper transmitted. 

Autograph letter signed. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A. Pepperell Esq 1 " 9 April 1775, inclosing a Newspaper, 
giving Account of the Distress of M 1 ' Ingersoll & others for their 
Attachment to Gov*. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, February 23. — The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston 
Weekly News Letter, No. 3726. 
1 printed sheet. 






William Gerabd de Bbahm to Lobd Dabtmouth. 



1775, April 10. Dartmouth St., Westminster. — Enumerates obstacles 
that will occur in laying out the province of East Florida in regular 



288 

tracts to be sold for the crown. The expense will overbalance the 
value of the land. Doubts whether any advantage will arise therefrom 
and desires fresh orders on this subject before he sails. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r De Brahra 10 April 1775 concerns sale of Lands in 
America. 



[Arthur] Lee to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 10. Monday. No. 2, Gordon Court, Temple. — Wishes 
to know when he can deliver into his Lordship's hands a petition from the 
Representatives of New Jersey which he has received in the absence of 
E>octor Franklin, to be presented to the King. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — M r Lee 10 April 1775. 



Richard Jackson to John Pownall. 

1775, April 11. — Returns, with his opinion, a Petition and Draught 
of a Charter of Incorporation desired for a college in some place in 
America. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — R d Jackson Esq r to M r Pownall Ap 1 1775. 



John Drinker to William Neate. 

1775, April 12. Philadelphia. — Great confusion caused by the 
politics of the British Court, views of the Republican partisans and 
smugglers of America. Accounts received of Parliament declaring the 
Americans rebels and determining to enforce the penal Acts against 
Boston and restrict their commerce. Serious evils seem imminent. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, April 12, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
John Drinker to William Neate. 



George Wilmot to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 13. Charing Cross. — Petition. Details his services 
since 1756 especially on board the sloop " Liberty " in July 1769. His 
sufferings from several mobs in consequence of his loyalty. Desires 
some relief for these distresses. 

Autograph signed. 2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Petition of George Wilmot of Boston. 



Lord North to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, April [14]. Good Friday. Bushy Park. — " The green ribband 
is in great request." Will lay Lord Galloway's request before the King 
with others already received and make known his wishes thereon. Learns 
from his Lordship's letter of the arrival of two Boston sufferers Richardson 
and Wilmot. Does not begrudge them the £20 advanced, but the Civil 



289 

List will not be able to bear much longer the numerous American 
demands made upon it. 

Autograph letter signed N. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Lord North April 1775. 

Ebenezek Richardson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 14. London. — Petition. Details his sufferings as an 
officer in the Customs at Boston. Imprisonment and cruelties ex- 
perienced in several places for his loyalty, arrival in England in a 
distressed and destitute condition. Prays for assistance. 

Signed. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Petition of Eb r Richardson. 

A "True Protestant" to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, April 15. Cork. — A vessel arrived from America brings in- 
telligence of the arrival of three ships from Britain at New York with 
British manufactures but they were compelled to depart thence, shewing 
that even that city agreed to the Resolutions decided upon by the General 
Congress. New York province is preparing for war. Remarks on the 
expedition sent out by Britain to complete Gage's army. Surprise at 
the destructive measures taken by Parliament. Draws his attention to 
the defenceless state of Ireland when the troops ordered for America 
leave there, as she will then be unprotected against any attacks of 
France and Spain. Emigration of Protestants from north of Ireland 
greatly increased of late years so recruits for army not available from 
there. This part of the Kingdom however is swarmed with Papists 
who would soon flock to the French and Spanish colours if planted on 
this shore. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Anonymous from Cork, April 1775. Abuse. 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 17. London. — States particulars concerning the case of the 
proprietors of lands under the Indian sales in April 1772. Desires him to 
solicit His Majesty for permission to carry these grants into execution 
as he cannot return to his Government and resist the application of the 
proprietors for confirmation thereof without injury, having previously 
promised that on the part of Government. 

Letter signed. 2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Tryon, London 17 th April 1775, relative to the 
granting Patents for Lands purchased of the Indians. 

Governor John Wentworth to Paul Went worth, Poland Street, 

Soho. 

1775, April 17. Portsmouth, New England.— The "Nautilus" 
arrived at Boston on the 14th instant. The Parliamentary proceedings 
of 20 February are by this time spread through New England; impos- 
sible to guess the result. The Armament at Boston has suffered from 
sickness and desertion. This town will suffer if the Bill to restrain 
the New England trade and fishery be executed. Will do his utmost to 

v 82140. T 



290 

promote the acceptance of the terms proposed. Hears " M r W. L." is the 
first man who has spoken discouraging insinuations against the vote. 
Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Portsmouth, N. E. April 17, 1775. Copy of a Letter 
from J. Wentworth to Paul Wentworth Esq r Eec d May 29, 1775. 

Sir Francis Bernard to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 18. Aylesbury. — Observations on the desirability of 
erecting the territory of Sagadahoc into a separate government and 
placing it immediately under the King, especially as the inhabitants 
object to the Massachusetts government and that province is now in 
rebellion. The population of Sagadahoc is not fewer than 20,000 and 
would increase. Advantages that would accrue to Britain if this measure 
is adopted. It would be a resort for the persecuted royalists of New 
England, a place for the exercise of the fishery and for supplying goods 
now brought from the West Indies. Will gladly give his Lordship 
further information if needed on this subject. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages,, 

Endorsed : — S r Fred. Bernard. April 1775, respecting Sagadahoc. 



Concord. 

N. D. Paper endorsed : — " Intelligence respecting the Concord 
Skirmish": — "On the 19th April Gen 1 Gage dispatched 800 men 
under the command of Col. Smith, to seize some provisions & Artillery 
at Concord." Were attacked by the Provincial Militia and finally 
retreated to Lexington where they were joined by 1,000 men under 
Lord Percy. Details of killed and wounded. 

1J folio pages. 



Return* of Troops. 

1775, April 19. — Return of the Army at Boston on this date, the 
Reinforcements afterwards sent out, and a Return dated 1 April of all 
the Forces under the Command of General Gage. 

2 folio pages. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 19. Saville Row. — Transmits the enclosed according to 
directions. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Gov r Tryon (without Date) respecting Lands located in 
]ST. York ; with Papers. 

Enclosures : — 

1774, February 2. New York. — Ebenezer Jessup. Representa- 
tion to Governor William Tryon. Gives an estimate of the 
expense attending the late Indian purchases and states his 
reasons for not being able to make them more exact. Assurances 



291 

Enclosures — cont. 

that all the proprietors highly esteem him and regret his 
leaving the province. 

A utograph signed. 3 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Representation of Eben r Jessup 1774 on Indian 
Purchases. 

1774, April 6. — Ebenezer Jessup. " A List of the Names of the 
Principle Propriators in the Late Indian purchase of Joseph 
Totten and Stephen Crossfield, And the Lots as on the Map, 
that they and their Associates are Respectively Interested in." 
Addressed to Governor Try on. 

Autograph signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Names of the Principle Persons Interested in 
the Purchase of Totten and Crossfield, and Their Quan- 
tities of Land, SfC in each Township By Ebene r Jessup. 
New York 6 Ap l 1774. 

A List of the Names of some of the principal Proprietors in 
the late Indian Purchase, as furnished with the assistance of 
Colonel Reid. \Drawn up by Governor Try on — the names the 
same as in the foregoing.'] 
If folio pages. 

. 
Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 20. Newbern, North Carolina. — No. 31. Remarks on 
the proceedings of the Assembly and also of the body of men calling 
themselves a Convention of Delegates as given in the enclosures. Is 
confident that firmness and perseverance on Britain's part will 
extinguish the democratic zeal in these colonies. The inhabitants of the 
Western Counties have given assurances of their loyalty to the King, 
having remembered correction they received for past insurrections from 
Governor Tryon. 

Letter signed. 12 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Newburn, N° Carolina, 20 th April 1775. Governor 
Martin (N° 31). R/ 21 st June. 2 Inclosures. Ent d . 

Enclosures : — 

1775, April 14.— North Carolina Gazette No. 3)9. " 
1 printed sheet. 

1 775, April 3-7. — Minutes of a General Meeting of Delegates 
of North Carolina in Convention. Relative to the association 
entered into by the General Congress at Philadelphia on 
20 October 1774 tvhich these delegates approve of and sign. 
Send their thanks to North Carolina representatives and 
receive a reply thereto. Resolution to collect Proclamation 
money to meet expenses incurred by delegates to the Continental 
Congress. Denounce the conduct of Macknight. Promise to 
further the measures recommended by the said Congress. 
Printed. 4 folio pages. 

Endorsed :— In Gov't Martin's (No. 31) of 20 April 1775. 

t 2 



292 

Lord Dartmouth to Governor William Tryon. 

1775, April [21]. Whitehall. — In consequence of the conversation 
with Governor Tryon the previous day respecting grants to Messrs. 
Totten, Crossfield, Van Renslaer, Low, Jessup and others, of lands 
purchased by them of the Indians in 1772, and being fully sensible of 
how important it is that His Majesty's faithful subjects in New York 
should be gratified in every reasonable request, he will submit to His 
Majesty that whenever the persons interested make application for 
such grants accompanied with a disavowal of all association to obstruct 
the importation or exportation of goods to and from Great Britain it 
may be advisable to comply with their request. 

Copy. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to Governor 
Tryon, dated April 1775. 



Captain [Walter Sloane] Laurie to his Father. 

1775, April 21. Boston. — Substance of a Letter from Captain Laurie 
of the 43rd Regiment [to his father — see beginning of his letter dated 
22 May]. Details of actions at Concord and Lexington. Losses on 
both sides. Intrepidity of English troops. Boston surrounded by 
Provincials, all communication cut off and he fears the troops will suffer 
in consequence from want of fresh provisions. 

Copy. 2J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy Letter fr. Cap. Laurie 21 April 1775. Boston. 
on the Concord Skirmish. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 22. London. — Is delighted that his Lordship sees the 
importance at the present time of granting Now York subjects all 
reasonable requests. Desires that he may be authorised to assure them 
that their difficulties will soon be settled satisfactorily. 

Letter signed. \\ folio pages. 



Massachusetts Committee of Safety to Asa Lawrence. 

1775, April 24. Cambridge. — Notice, signed Joseph Warren, 
chairman. That a captain's commission will be granted to him as soon 
as he has finished enlisting 96 soldiers according to orders — he is 
allowed to nominate a Lieutenant and Ensign to serve under him. 

Printed form filled in. \ quarto page. 



Alexander Duncan to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 28. Birchanger, Essex. — Regrets contents of enclosure 
as it clearly shows that America is preparing for war. Hopes his 
Lordship may be instrumental in advising measures to prevent such a 
calamity. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Duncan 28 April, inclosing a Letter rec d from 
America, giving some Account of the State of Affairs. 



293 

Enclosure : — 

Joseph Smith to Alexander Duncan. 

1775, February 15. New Haven, Connecticut. — Apologises for 
non-delivery of letter written last year. Acknowledges his of 
the summer of 1773. Unhealthy state of New Haven, Alarming 
condition of affairs. Both sides preparing for war. Fears if 
the late Acts of Parliament are attempted to be put in 
execution by force, such event is inevitable. Stagnation of 
trade, and probable closing of the Courts of Justice as already 
done in Massachusetts and South Carolina. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Governor William Tryon to Lord North. 

1775, April 28. London. — Applying for Assistance from the 
Treasury to answer exigencies before his departure to America. 
Copy. 1 quarto page. 

Lieutenant General James Prevost to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, April 30. Breda. — Begs the favour to deliver the enclosed 
letter to the King. Is well acquainted with the country and people of 
America from his long service there and would gladly fill any employ- 
ment in the military or civil line. Asks for Lord North's patronage. 

Letter signed. 3| quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Breda. 30 th April 1775. Lieu* Gen 1 Prevost. R/ 
May. Applying for a civil Employment in America. 

Enclosure : — 

Lieutenant General James Prevost to the King. 

1775, April 30. Breda. — Is anxious to " serve in any wise, in 
any rank fy in any part of America " that may be thought 
proper. Will endeavour to show by faithful service his 
appreciation of many favours shown to him by His Majesty. 
Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— To The King. Breda 20 th April 1775. 
Lieu* General Prevost, 

Accompanying the above i3 : — 

1775, April 30. Breda. — Copy of Lieutenant General Prevost's 
letter to Lord Barrington desiring to be recommended to the King for 
further service " notwithstanding his peculiar circumstances," and 
enclosing copy of his letter to the King. 

Dennis De Berdt to Lord Dartmouth. 

N.D. [1775, April]. Wednesday evening, 9 o'clock. — Forwards the 
enclosed as they are the latest intelligence from America and may be 
acceptable for their importance though he is aware their contents are 
not pleasant. 

T+etter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — M r De Berdt 1775. respecting the Proceedings of the 
Committees at N. York in March 1775. 



2.94 



Enclosures .*— 



1775, March 18.— Extract of a letter from New York giving the 
Proceedings of the New York Committee in nominating deputies 






for a Provincial Convention to be held on 20 April to choose 
delegates for the General Congress at Philadelphia 10 May 
next. A postscript of 22 March relates the proceedings of 
the people against Robert and John Murray who had, contrary 
. to the Non- Importation Association, unloaded goods from a 
ship arrived from London. 
2% folio pages. 

1775, March 17. New- York. — Printed Paper signed u A son of 
Freedom" and headed " The following Letter was some Nights 
ago thrown in among the Sons of Liberty." Stating reasons 
why Robert and John Murray should leave the Province owing 
to their landing goods in a clandestine manner at New York. 
1 long folio page. 

1775, March 21. New York. — Robert and John Murray. Public 
Declaration. Regret the imprudent and unjustifiable action 
they have taken and promise if they remain in that city not to 
transact any trade or commerce whatsoever during the con- 
tinuance of the Association which will be a breach of the same 
unless Congress should- think, fit to indulge them in that liberty. 
They are willing to deliver to other persons all consigned goods 
now in their possession and yield the profits of the commissions. 
Printed. 1 quarto page. 






Quakers to the King. 

N. D. [Qy. about April or May 1775]. — Address and Petition. 
Asking that the sword may be stayed and other means tried to procure 
a firm and lasting union with the Americans. Amongst the signatures 
are John Fry, William Storrs Fry, Robert Howard, John Fothergill, 
Thomas and Robert Letchworth, etc., etc., 61 names in all. 

Original. 1 sheet. 

Endorsed : — Quakers Petition. 



The Earl of Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 1. Williamsburg. — ~No. 26. Gives details of the insur- 
rection of the people in consequence of his requesting Lieutenant Collins 
to remove, some gunpowder from a magazine here to the "Fowey" 
man-of-war. Further disturbances expected. Has applied to General 
Gage for assistance, also to Admiral Graves for one of his large ships. 
Personal danger of himself and other Government officers. The neces- 
sity of maintaining the King's authority in this province by the presence 
and assistance of troops. 

Letter signed. 7| large folio pages. 

Endorsed:— Williamsburgh l 8t May 1775. Lord Dun more. (N° 26) 
R/ June 24 1775. Ent d , 

Extract of the foregoing. 



295 

Richard Yates to John Sargent. 

1775, May 1. New York. — " The News of the Action arrived in 
Town on Sunday Morning the 23 d ult. and You may judge caused no 
little Tumult among the Inhabitants." Proceedings in the town in 
consequence. Arms of the city seized. The recent Acts for stopping 
the fishery have exasperated the Americans; the port is entirely blocked 
up by the people, who are in possession of the keys of the Custom House 
and no provisions will at any rate be allowed to go to Newfoundland 
either hence or from Philadelphia. Continental Congress meets on the 
10th instant, and if the report is true that Parliament has blocked 
most of the ports, Congress will block up all and be much more united 
in their opposition than hitherto. 

Extract. Intercepted. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — New York, May 1, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Richard Yates'to John Sargent Esq r . 



Nicholas Hoffman to Messrs. Perry and Hayes, Bristol. 

1775, May 2. New York. — " M r Sherbrooke I dare say will 
give you a full Account of the confused State of this Continent 
All our Ports will be stopp'd either by Great Brittain or the People 
here, if the present unhappy Disturbances are not soon made up, for 
you may assure yourself that the Colonies mean to be more united than 
ever since the unhappy Affair last at Boston in which many Lives were 
lost." Associations are being handed round from house to house and 
signed in this and neighbouring provinces against oppressive Acts of 
Parliament. If England does not soon stop them Great Britain and 
America will both be ruined. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — New York, May 2, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Nicholas Hoffman, to Mess rs Perry & Hayes, Bristol. 



John Shaw, Junr., to Joseph Wharton, Junr. 

1775, May 2. Philadelphia. — The peaceful city of Philadelphia 
now looks like war. The different companies are practising twice a 
day and a determined spirit exhibited. 

Extract, Intercepted. ^ folio page. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia May 2, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Jn° Shaw Jun r to M r Joseph Wharton Jun r . 



Theophylact Bache to Messrs. Lane, Son, and Fraser. 

1775, May 3. New York. — All supplies going from America for the 
fishery and commerce to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, etc. were stopped 
27th of last month. Personal losses to himself in being debarred from 
executing the large orders received from his friends. 

Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed .-—New York May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Theophylact Bache to Mess rs Lane, Son k Fraser. 



296 

Henry Crugkr, Junior, to Henry Cruger. 

1775, May 3. Westminster. — "Now Sir for a few Politics. Let 
me first observe that Colonel Skene to whom I gave such exalted 
Letters to You is by no Means the very great and consequential Man 
he will endeavour to make all believe." Gives what he considers a 
true estimate of Skene's character and the reasons for his intercourse 
with him. Prejudicial remarks concerning Governor Tryon returning 
to his government. Account of a conversation held between Tryon 
and a gentleman whom he informed he intended to patronise the 
Cruger family in New York. Despises his motives but intends to gain 
by his good offices. 

Extract. Intercepted. 4^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Westminster, May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Henry Cruger to Henry Cruger Esq r at New York. 



Henry Cruger to Messrs. Cruger and Mallard. 

1775, May 3. New York. — Enclosed newspapers not to be depended 
upon but Stephen Payne Galloway (who goes with his lady in this 
packet) will be able to give full accounts of all that has taken place. 
On the 28 th ultimo all ships laden with provisions were stopped at this 
harbour, but as Philadelphia objected to such restrictions on trade the 
ports are again opened until the decision of Congress on 10 May. 
American troubles hourly increase. Fears for the safety of their vessels. 

Extract. Intercepted. \\ folio page. 

Endorsed: — N. York, May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
H. Cruger to Mess™ Cruger and Mallard. Bristol. 



Henry Cruger to Peter V. Schaack, New York. 

1775, May 3. London. — " It will be no difficulty for Vardell 
and 1 unitedly to get for you the reversion in the Admiralty" 
Disposition of the opposition party in the House of Commons with 
regard to American affairs. Remarks on the selfish, crafty Rctions of 
M r Burke and his reserved conduct towards the province for which he is 
agent. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — London 3 May 1775. Extract of a Letter from H. 
Cruger to Peter Schaach. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 3. St. James's Street. — Hopes that the distress he feels 
from the present state of his family will excuse his repeated applications 
for assistance. [An autograph copy is amongst the Hutchinson letters 
in the British Museum, Eg. 2661, fo. 148, and is printed in his 
Correspondence, Vol. L, p. 437.] 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Hutchinson 3 May, 1775, relative to his own 
circumstances & some Provision for his Son. 



297 

Ab. P. Lott to Alexander Baxter. 

1775, May 3. New York. — If affairs are not soon settled most of 
the merchants will become bankrupts. New England much in debt. 
Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Ab. P. Lott to Alexan 1 " Baxter Esq r . 



Philip Lott to George Elphinstone, Copenhagen. 

1775, May 3. New York. — No sale for this tea at present. If 
times change expects to consign a vessel to his house. Politics in great 
confusion here. 

Copy. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed : — New York, May 3, 1775. Copy of a Letter from Philip 
Lott to M r Geo. Elphinston. 

Isaac Low to John Blackburn, Merchant, London. 

1775, May 3. New York. — The whole continent in the utmost 
confusion. Implores him to exert himself to procure a cessation of 
hostilities (if not redress of grievances) so that some treaty of accom- 
modation may be set on foot to prevent the entire ruin of America. 

Extract. Intercepted, f folio page. 

Endorsed : — New York, May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Isaac Low to M r John Blackburn. 

Lord North to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 3. Downing Street — Encloses Budget of today. 
Not Autograph. In the third person. ^ quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Budget of that day y s date. — Supply for the year 1775. 
1J large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Supply & Ways & Means. 1775. 

S. Pintard to George Spencer. 

1775, May 3. New York. — " We have been in the greatest distress 
and Affliction here on the melancholy News from Boston of an Action 
between the Kings Troops and the Inhabitants." The colonies are 
now more united than ever — an association being circulated all over the 
country opposing the execution of the arbitrary and oppressive Acts of 
Parliament which they will never submit to. General Gage will find a 
large force to oppose him and though he may destroy towns, he cannot 
enforce obedience to Parliament. Americans want a Constitution upon 
the principles of liberty and are determined to have it. As fishery is 
prohibited, Philadelphia has stopped provisions to Newfoundland — 
several vessels being obliged to unload. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — New York May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
M r Pintard to M r George Spencer. 



298 

Smith Ramadge to Messrs. Johnston and Canning. 

1775, May 3. New York. — Since the recent action the people of New 
York have decided to stand or fall with the other provinces. Business 
at a stand still, port shut up by the mob several days but now re-opened ; 
expects however that all the ports will be closed soon after the General 
Congress meets. 

Extract, Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York May 3, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Smith Ramadge to Mess rs Johnston & Canning. 



[Governor William Tryon] to Lord North. 

1775, May 3. London. — Desires he may be enabled to discharge 
the debts contracted in the preparations made for his Government. 
Purposes to be at Portsmouth tomorrow but waits his Lordship's 
pleasure so as to satisfy these demands though he will then be on 
demurrage £5 a day. 

Copy. 1^ quarto pages. 



Anthony Van Dam to WillIam Neate. 

1775, May 3. New York. — " Our disorder is too great to write upon 
Mercantile Affairs, therefore shall not reply to your late favours." 
Resentment against the late Acts of Parliament. Total repeal of all 
those passed since 1763 must take place or the affections of America be 
lost. Reconciliation must be made speedily or dreadful consequences 
will ensue. All supply withheld from Newfoundland and the fisheries, 
and no provisions allowed to be carried to Boston. Entreats him to do 
his utmost to save America and Great Britain from ruin. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — New York May 3. 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Anth. Van Dam to William Neate Esq. 



Lieutenant Governor Caivwallader Colden to Lord 

Dartmouth. 

1775, May 4. New York. — Introducing M r Wilkins, a member of 
the Assembly of this province, as a gentleman of excellent character, 
good understanding, and zealous attachment to Government. For the 
latter reason he has met with much persecution and leaves for England 
today. He can give much intelligence of the state of affairs here as 
he is well acquainted with the political schemes of different parties. 

Letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed:— IS Gov r Colden— 1775. rec. M r Wilkins. 



John Cruger to Edmund Burke. 

1775, May 4. New York. — "The melancholy Situation that this 
City and Colony is in is beyond expression since the receival of the 
Account from Boston of the Engagement between the King's Troops and 
the Provincials."— The cause of liberty has become general throughout. 



29.9 

America. The Governor and Council have fully represented the matter 
to His Majesty and doubtless it will soon be made public in England. 
Extract. Intercepted, § folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York May 4, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
John Cruger to Edm d Burke Esq 1 '. 



James Richardson to Alexander Gordon, Student of Physick, 
at Doctor George Skene's, Aberdeen. 

1775, May 4. New York.— " The Number of Provincials killed is 
not so many as the Troops, which seems very probable from the cir- 
cumstance of firing from cover." Dispute as to which side made the 
first attack in the late skirmish. All letters coming from that quarter 
by post are opened by the New Englanders, so true account of the 
action is difficult to obtain. Friends of Government in this city in 
danger and business suspended ; port now re-opened and the whole 
city entered into an association to abide the measures recommended 
by the next Congress. All unanimous for the American cause. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York. 4 May 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Ja 8 Richardson to M r Alex r Gordon. 



A. Pepperrell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 5. — His reasons for seeking the appointment of naval 
officer of New Hampshire. Desires his Lordship to consider his 
situation and grant his request. Sails for America in about 10 days 
and will gladly be the bearer of any commands. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A. Pepperell Esq r . 



Colonel Joseph Go r ham to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 8. No. 6 Buckingham Gate. — As it is decided he should 
enter the American service, he has endeavoured to settle his private 
affairs with his creditors. Present and future pecuniary difficulties. 
Remarks on his wife and children. Desires some appointment may be 
given to the former as housekeeper to one of the palaces. 

Autograph letter signed. 2| folio pages. 

Endorsed :— Col. Gorham 8 May 1775. 

G. Green to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 8. — Desires to be remembered for any vacancy that may 
occur in any province. Notwithstanding his preference for New 
Hampshire on account of numerous friends there, he is willing to forego 
that if appointment offers elsewhere. Will gladly work with another 
if so proposed by his Lordship. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — M r Green 8 May 1775 desiring an office. 



300 

Captain Laurie to his Father. 

1775, May 8. Boston. — Letter not signed nor addressed, probably 
from Captain Laurie of the 43rd to his father (see 22 May). Sends 
printed paper containing an account of the action on the 19th. English 
loss not so considerable as at first imagined. Lieutenant Hull of his 
company has since died of his wounds. Enemy's loss four times 
greater than theirs. Denies from personal observation that the troops 
first fired upon the people. Complains of cruelty shown by the enemy. 
All communication with the country is now cut off, and a large force 
gathered here from this and neighbouring provinces ready for action. 
The General's conduct has been to avoid extremities and use conciliatory 
measures. Proceedings of troops and engineers since 19th ultimo. 
Many persons have left the town with the General's permission. All 
communication with the country being cut off, fresh provisions are 
unavailable. Gives list of rebel Generals. Want of money and 
provisions will surely make them disperse soon. Help expected from 
Halifax for the English. 

2\ large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — 8 th May 1775. News from Boston. Anon. 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 8. 8 o'clock p.m. On board the " Johana." — Expects to 
leave to-morrow. Thanks for past favours and hopes to merit future 
protection. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Portsmouth 8 May 1775. Gov r Tryon. 

Edmdnd Burke to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 9. Tuesday evening. Westminster. — Fears he will be 
unable to find a Peer to deliver the New York Memorial to the House 
of Lords to-morrow as most of his friends therein are out of town, — will 
do his best, though otherwise engaged, but cannot promise success. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— Ed. Burke Esq r . 9 May 1775. Ex. 

Articles of Confederation of the United Colonies. 

1775, May 10. — Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union, 
entered into by the Delegates of the several Colonies of New Hamp- 
shire, Massachusetts Hay, &c. in General Congress met at Philadelphia 
May 10th 1775. 

Copy . 4 folio pa ges. 

Endorsed : — America. 

John and Peter Chevalier to Ingham Foster. 

1775, May 13. Philadelphia. — Having enclosed in their last a paper 
relating some circumstances of a skirmish or running fight between the 
Regulars under General Gage and the Boston Provincials, now send 
this day's newspaper containing depositions showing that the Regulars 
were the aggressors. Inhabitants of Boston have suffered much the 



301 

last twelve months from officers and soldiers. Unanimity prevails from 
the colonies of New England to South Carolina and people of all 
ranks are associating for the purposes of military action. Congress 
now sitting here but their deliberations will be kept secret for some 
time ; measures recommended by them will doubtless be universally 
adopted. Shows how General Gage commenced hostilities in the late 
action. 

Copy. Intercepted. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia May 13, 15. Copy of a Letter from 
Jn° & Peter Chevalier to M r Ingham Foster. 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, May 13. Philadelphia. — Congress has met for three days but 
wait for delegates from Rhode Island before making propositions. On 
the 15th they go into Committee to consider ways and means to find 
men and money. Gives his opinion on this subject. Patrick Henry 
delayed in Virginia it is feared by fresh difficulties with Lord Dunmore. 
John Watts of the New York Council really gone to England to present 
to the King the true state of that Province as drawn up by the Governor 
and Council, showing the impossibility of subduing this continent as the 
people of New York as well as the other colonies are determined to oppose 
the measures of Parliament. Just heard that the Massachusetts people 
have set out to take possession of Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Con- 
sequences that have resulted by the mail from Boston being broken 
open. 

Extract. Intercepted. 3| folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Philadelphia, May 13, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Thomas Wharton, to Samuel Wharton Esq r . 

Witting [Willing] Morris & Co. to Thomas Stone 
Cornfactor, London. 

1775, May 14. Philadelphia. — (The same paragraph to John Motteux 
Esq r ) " You noay depend that all Exports from these Colonies will 
certainly cease on or before the 10 th Sept r ." It is almost certain this 
may happen on 20 July and probably much sooner ; it will depend on 
Gage's operations. Congress keep their Councils so secret that definite 
information cannot be obtained. 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia May 14, 75. Extract of a Letter from 
Witting Morris & Co. to M r Tho s Stone. 



Chief Justice Frederick Smyth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 15. New Jersey. — Commends the bearer, Captain Michael 
Kearney tor his zealous services in the Koyal Navy ; his loyalty shown 
in recent riots has excited such a spirit of resentment and defiance 
against him that he has been compelled to leave the country. " In 
truth we are in a bad way." Will endeavour to fulfil his judicial duties 
with as much punctuality and resolution as possible, and hitherto the 
authority of the Courts of Justice there has been pretty well supported 
but owing to the unhappy and dangerous spirit among the people 



302 

cannot promise tbat the authority of Government or laws will long 
prevail. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Ch. Just, of N. Jersey, 15 May 1775, recommending 
Capt. Kearney. 

Alexander Innes to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 16. Charles Town. — Proceedings of the [Assembly's] 
committee before and after the action of 19 April. Fears if Gage does 
not strike some successful blow within a few weeks there will be a total 
change of Government here. Disturbances caused by the contents of a 
letter from Mr. Lee in London proposing freedom to the slaves who 
desert and join the King's troops. Present condition of the Counoil. 
States what he thinks the new Governor should do on his arrival here. 
Advisability of stationing two regiments in Charles Town and frigates 
under an able officer in the harbour as people are very despondent. No 
official record of the Boston action has been received, but many erroneous 
statements are made thereon by the enemy and circulated. 

Autograph letter signed- 7§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M 1 ' Innis Charles Town, 16 May 1775. American 
Affairs. 

John Inman to Richard Benson Walker, Hodsdon. 

1775, May 17. Boston. — " Dear Brother, I have delivered in M rs 
Calahan's Care a Packet containing Copies of most of my Accounts, also 
a List of Debts due to and from me." There are threats of bombarding 
the town, so sends these papers for safety. About 3.500 people have 
moved into the country with their furniture, but Gage has prudently 
kept all the merchandise in town to restrain the madness of the country. 
Captain Hall with a reinforcement of marines has just arrived. 

Extra ct. Intercepted. 1 folio p ag e . 

Endorsed: — Boston, May 17, 1775. Extract of a Letter from John 
Inman, to M r Rich d Benson Walker. 

Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 18. New Bern, North Carolina. — Separate. Remarks 
on the recent resolution of the House of Commons. The effect of the 
Propositions contained therein on the Americans will depend upon the 
light in which the Congress now sitting in Philadelphia considers them. 
Disposition of the people in different parts of his province. The pernicious 
influence of press and faction is more weighty than the measures of 
Parliament. Gives his reasons for not calling the Assembly at the present 
juncture. 

Autograph letter signed. 7f folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Separate, New Bern. 18 May, 1775. Gov 1 " Martin 
(Seperate.) R/ 23 d Sept. 1775. Ent d . 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, May 20. Philadelphia. — Refers to some enclosed papers for 
news which shows that the hint he gave respecting Ticonderoga is verified. 
Congress has resolved to recommend the removal of all cannon and 



303 

stores down to Fort Gage and there properly to fortify the pass. All 
trade with Newfoundland has been stopped. Doctor Franklin's pro- 
ceedings in the Congress. Unanimity and firmness among the people 
on this continent. 

Copy. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, May 20, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton Esq r . 



Captain Laurie. 

1775, May 22. Boston. — Letter not signed nor addressed, probably 
from Captain Laurie. "My Letters to my father of 21 st April 8c 8 th 
inst. I hope you will receive safe, and to them I refer you for the 
News of this country to that date." Shows the awkward and ridiculous 
situation they have been in since he last wrote by being blocked up in 
Boston, and not allowed to return the insults of the rebels. Supposes 
Gage has good reasons for being inactive, but personally he considers 
this forbearance and studied moderation will never answer the purpose 
desired. Encloses copy of a letter from Doctor Warren respecting 
release of Major Dunbar. Failure of expedition to one of the islands in 
consequence of the naval commander's neglectful conduct. Received 
intelligence that the people of Connecticut' and Albany have taken fort 
Ticonderoga, also of seizure of the Earl of Dunmore in Virginia 
Damage caused by fire in this town. 

2 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — 22 d May — 1775. News from Boston Anon. 



Frederick, Bishop of Derry, to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 23. Derry. — Ascribes the rebellious spirit in the central 
provinces of America to the exportation from Ireland of nearly 33.000 
fanatical and hungry republicans in the course of a few years. Land 
uncultivated; regrets that his own brethren have not laid the foundation 
of an exclusive cultivation of the island. Remarks on the progress of 
independency and a manifest increase among the inhabitants of a re- 
publican spirit. Believes it results greatly from the non-residence of the 
clergy who leave extensive and populous parishes to the care of an 
indigent curate, an ignorant priest and a factious dissenting minister. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Bishop of Derry 23 May 1775, respecting the Migrations 
from Ireland, and the Growth of Republicanism & Dissension from 
the Non -residence of the Clergy. 



Joseph Goldthwait to John Blackburn. 

1775, May 24. Boston. — Directions for sending to America a 
quantity of coal and provisions much needed. The whole of the 
country is arming and in a state of rebellion. Requests everything sent 
out to be addressed to himself Barrack Master at Boston and that will 
ensure a free admittance. 

Copy. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Boston, 24 May 1775. Copy of a Letter from Jo 8 
Goldthwait to John Blackburn tfsq r . Rec d 26th June 1775. 



304 

Lieutenant Colonel W. Dalrymple to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 29. Monday evening. — " Since I had the honor of 
seeing your Lordship this morning, I have made some inquiry into the 
affair that has lately passed near Boston." It appears from accounts 
given that the troops fulfilled their intention of destroying the stores 
collected at Concord, and the measures pursued by them appeared to be 
those of deliberation and sound military judgment, Hopes General 
Gage's despatch will confirm details given by troops themselves. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lieut* Col. Dalrymple 29 May 1775 on the Skirmish at 
Concord. 



Governor Thomas Hutchinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, May 29. 9 o'clock p.m. — Has no doubt the printed account 
from Boston is a very partial one. Expects Government will receive 
very different advices from General Gage. Seeks so justify the troops 
for their conduct in the action. The paper sent is published under 
the directions of Adams and the master of the ship belongs to one of 
the most incendiary families. P.S. — Captain Brown with the General's 
despatches sailed four days after the action. 

Autograph letter signed. With seal (broken). \\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Gov r Hutchinson 29 May 1775, on the Skirmish at 
Concord. 



John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 29. Monday \ past 4 p.m.- -"I am this moment 
returned from the City but without seeing Captain Derby tho I 
pursued every means and had every assistance to find him out." Gives 
account of the Concord skirmish as received from Messrs. Lane and 
Fraser who are in connection with Captain Derby. Letters for Lord 
Dartmouth from General Gage are on board the " Sukey." Encloses 
paper reprinted from Salem newspaper and hopes his Lordship will 
speedily send it to the King. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed-. — Mr Pownall, 29 May, 1775, inclosing Salem Newspaper, 
relating the Skirmish of Concord. 



Enclosure : — 

1775, May 29.— The London Evening Post Extraordinary 
(No. 8,296) consisting of an Article headed " From the Essex 
Gazette. Printed at Salem, in New England. Salem 
April 25," being an account of the action at Concord. " Last 
Wednesday the 19th of April, the Troops of his Britannick 
Majesty commenced Hostilities upon the People of this Province 
attended with Circumstances of Cruelty not less brutal than 
what our venerable Ancestors received from the vilest Savages 
of the Wilderness;' etc. A list of the provincials killed, wounded, 
and missing is added. 
1 printed page. 



305 

Countess Goweii to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, May 30. Whitehall. — Commends to his kind consideration 
Captain Foy, and desires it may be made worth his while to remain in 
America as his services are most requisite to Lord Dunmore at the 
present time. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Countess Gower 30 May 1775, recom& Capt n Foy. 



Jonathan Sewall to Major General Frederick 
Haldimand. 

1775, May 30. Boston. — In compliance with his request, reduces to 
writing the substance of some loose hints respecting the present very 
alarming state of public affairs in America, the cause of the disorders, and 
the remedies which alone seem to promise a radical cure. The hidden 
spring of this wonderful movement is the ancient republican spirit 
brought by the first emigrants and which the form of government in 
the New England colonies has cherished and kept alive. Considers 
the present calamities might have been prevented by a seasonable appli- 
cation to the cure, and may even now be stopped by a speedy exertion 
of British vigour and an attention of Parliamentary wisdom to the radical 
cause. 

Autograph letter signed. 16 quarto pages. 

Endorsed on wrapper : — Gen 1 Haldimand Ex. 
Copy of the foregoing. 

Lord Barrington to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 1. War Office. — " There are three officers named 
King in the Army, but none of them in Regiments serving in 
America." 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Vis. Barrington 1 June 1775 concerning the Names 
of King & Hawkshaw in the Army Lists. 

Colonel James Robertson to [ ]. 

1775, June 1. Boston. — Discovery of coal at Cape Breton — advisa- 
bility of conveying it to Boston in consequence of the rebels cutting off all 
supplies of fuel from that place. Mr. Knulton Junior delivers this with 
proposals for his approval. Fears the garrison will be distressed for 
coal soon, though he has secured some in England. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Col° Robertson Letter 1 st June 1775. 



Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, June 1. Philadelphia. — One of the Council of Antigua has 
informed him of the distress of the islands on the prospect of expor- 
tation being stopped to their ports. Congress has decided to petition 
the King for redress of grievances. It has already voted 10,000 men 

y 82140. u 



306 

for the protection of Boston and directed New York to raise 3,000 for 
its particular .safety. Surprise at the Doctor's silence at the Congress. 
Lord Dunmore having called his assembly has necessitated the absence 
of the president, the Virginia speaker. The people of Virginia much 
exasperated with Dunmore's conduct of late. 
Copy, Intercepted. 3^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, June 1, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
M r Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton Esq r . 



The Reverend Thomas Hatton to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, June 3. Waters Upton, Shropshire. — Enclosing a letter 
from his nephew in New Jersey, relative to the temper, &c. of the 
Americans. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

John Hatton to the Reverend Thomas Hatton. 

1775, February 17. New Jersey. — Private news. This country 
in a most disordered state, friends of Government very pre- 
cariously situated and commerce stopped. States objections 
made by the Sons of Liberty to the measures of Parliament 
and the answers given by the Sons of Loyalty (of whom he is 
one) to show the true foundation of the present dispute. Details 
the recent obnoxious conduct of the Bostonians. Steps taken by 
the Quakers. The Sons of Faction grieved at the refusal of the 
JVew York Assembly to approve the proceedings of the Congress, 
and the merchants of that place in general threaten a total 
declension from the party. 

Autograph letter signed. 7| folio pages. 



Alexander Innes to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, June 3, Saturday. Charles Town. — The Assembly met on the 
1st instant and passed their Tax Bill, ordering certificates to be issued 
for about £140,000 currency. The Lieutenant Governor adjourned 
them to the 19th. He (Lieutenant Governor Bull) has received a 
letter from General Gage with an account of the action on the 19th April. 
The Provincial Congress is meeting in secret, but it is well-known they 
intend to frame an association, raise troops, and take the Government 
into their own hands. The Governor expected every hour and it is 
hoped his presence will aid the King's servants. Two frigates in this 
harbour would prevent much mischief. The " Tamar " lies some 
miles below the town and Capt. Thorn borough, an old, good officer, 
has been confined to bed two months. As the Lieut. Gov. is constantly 
at his country house waiting with anxious impatience for the arrival 
of Lord William Campbell no requisition could be made to the Captain 
for any protection from insult. Refers him for further particulars 
to Captain Barbet Commissary of Stores in West Florida now on his 
way to England. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed ;— M r Innis Rec cl July 31, 1775. 



307 

John Pemberton to Jonathan Wilkinson, at 
Cockerinouth. 

1775, June 3. Philadelphia. — " It is a sorrowful time amongst us, 
little but Confusion and Disorder." Trials are daily increasing. 
Regrets that some of their youth have joined the populace and are 
training for war, but hopes by faithful endeavours they may be brought 
to see the inconsistency of their conduct. 

Extract. Intercepted, J folio page. 

Endorsed : — Philadelphia 6 th mo. 3 d 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Jn° Pemberton to Jon a Wilkinson. 



John Pitcairn to Lord Adam Gordon. 

1775, June 3. Boston. — Will gladly do all iu his power to serve 
Mr. Finnie, both for his own merit and Lord Adam's recom- 
mendation. For the present he has been appointed to one of their 
Grenadier Companies where he will have many opportunities to 
distinguish himself as they encamp in a few days. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Boston June 3. 1775. Copy of a Letter from John 
Pitcairn to Lord Adam Gordon. 



Thomas Fisher to George Logan, at John and Robert 
Barclay's, London. 

1775, June 5. Philadelphia. — The Congress is sitting and has 
prohibited the exportation of provisions to the fishing islands and 
coasts, and also to the British army and fleet. Troops have been 
provided for New England and New York. Gives names of officers 
appointed. The city bears a warlike appearance. Has been informed 
that about twenty of General Burgoyne's horse, put out to graze, have 
been taken by the provincials. Efforts will be made to disappoint 
the designs of the King's troops. Hopes a change in the Ministry or 
some other event may produce an alteration in the system of Colony 
Administration to the mutual benefit of both countries. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philad a 6 mo. 5, 1775. Extract. 



Doctor Benjamin Franklin to Thomas Life. 

1775, June 5. Philadelphia.- — Has received his favour of April 5 
giving- an account of the progress of his suit. Affairs are now so 
situated that he does not think he will ever return to England. General 
Gage having commenced hostilities with America and civil war now 
begun, which he has no chance of living to see the end of, being seventy 
years of age, it does not seem worth while to proceed in the appeal to 
the House of Lords. Desires him therefore to withdraw the petition 
and will settle his account. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, June 5, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
D r Benjamin Franklin to Thomas Life Esq 1 '. 

D 2 



308 

John Penn to William Baker. 

1775, June 5. Philadelphia. — "The Post brought me yesterday 
your Letter of the 5 th of April, inclosing M r Burke's & M r Hartley's 
Resolutions, the Merchants Petition to The King, and the Bill re- 
straining the Trade of the Five Middle Colonies, filled up, and a Clause 
added." Is persuaded that the part of the Bill respecting the three 
lower counties will not have the desired effect as they will be governed by 
the decisions of the Congress. Lord North's conciliatory resolution has 
been ill-received here. Since the late action all the provinces have 
applied themselves to military exercise. Grage is besieged in Boston by 
9,(;00 men and his destruction would have been attempted were it not 
for the distress it would have brought upon the town. Remarks on 
armies preparing in Philadelphia, New England and New York. His 
own position very uni?leasant. 

Copy. Intercepted. 5 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Philadelphia, June 5, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Governor Penn, to William Baker Esq r - 

Sir W. Pepperrell to Lord Dartmooth. 

1775, June 6. Summer Street. 
Autograph letter signed. 10 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — S r -W. Pepperell 6 th June, 1775, respecting his own 
Situation & the Situation of Affairs in America. 

Disposition of the Colonies. 

Copy of a letter unsigned and unaddressed' dated Philadelphia 
6 June 1775. — " The Unanimity of the confederate Colonies is every 
day increasing in Strength." Lord North's proposal will be referred by 
all the Assemblies to the Congress and no Colony will treat separately. 
It is intended to send one more petition from the Congress to give 
Britain another chance of recovering and retaining the affection and 
commerce of the Colonies. Fears there is not wisdom enough among 
them to seize this golden opportunity, but that violent methods will still 
be pursued towards America. Sees in the future her foreign trade 
stopped but her domestic flourishing and a few strongly fortified posts 
on the coast garrisoned by the British troops and supported by fleets, as 
Spain holds Ceuta and Oran, with the country all round their enemies. 

Accompanied by a paper headed " A Counter Prophecy," beginning — ■ 
" If the Spirit of Prophecy, as well as all the Wisdom and Virtue, be 
'* not departed to America, and confined there by the Non -exportation 
" Decree it may be lawful even for an Englishman to deal in futurities." 
Britain will no longer brook the indignities of America but exert herself 
to humble the arrogance shown by her. States reasons for present 
measures and the ultimate consequences that will ensue to America from 
her rebellion. The contest is so unequal that if America has any wisdom 
or virtue she will endeavour to cement that union to which she owes 
her present freedom. 

4 J and 3 folio pages respectively. 

Endorsed . — Copy of a Letter from Philadelphia dated G June 1775. 
An Account of American Affairs &c. by an American. 



300 

Edmund Burke to the Committee of Correspondence for the 
General Assembly at New York. 

1775, June 7. Westminster. — On the introduction of their remon- 
strance to the House of Commons a dispute on the propriety of such a 
paper being presented took place and it was refused admittance. The 
Duke of Manchester presented it to the Lords where, after a long 
debate, it was also rejected. Has received no answer to the Petition to 
the King. 

Extract. Intercepted. 3| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Westminster 7 June 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Edm. Burke Esq 1 ' to the Committee of New York. 

Governor Guy Carleton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 7. Postscript 8 June. Montreal. — No. 12. Intelligence 
received from General Gage ; assistance desired by him. Arrival of 
Captain Hazen bringing an account of the landing at St. John's of 
Benedict Arnold with a number of armed men. Rebels in arms upon the 
Lakes. Their movements. Consternation in the towns and country. 
Indefensible state of Quebec. Caution and circumspection required on 
account of the tainted minds of the people by the cabals and intrigues. 
Communication stopped between this and the other provinces ; money 
required. P.S. — June 8. Return of the enemy, who have taken post 
near to St. John's. 

Copy. 7 J folio pages. [The original signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, Colonial Correspondence Quebec, Vol. 11, f. 56.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Gov 1 " Carleton to the Earl of 
Dartmouth dated Montreal 7 th and 8 th of June 1775 (N° 12) 
R/ 29* July. 

Enclosures : — 

Colonel Ethan Allen to James Morrison and the Merchants 
that are friendly to the Cause of Liberty in Montreal. 

1775, May 18. — Acquaints them that Lakes George and 
Champlain with the fortresses are now in the possession of the 
Colonies. The advance guard is now at St. Johrfs and desires 
lt immediate personal intercourse.'* Assistance as to provisions, 
ammunition, etc. is wanted and forthwith expected and they 
are desired, without further notice, to prepare these articles to 
the amount of £500 and deliver them instantaneously. His own 
instructions are not to injure or molest the Canadians or Indians 
— this to be communicated to them. 
Copy. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Ethan Allen, stiling 
himself Commander of the Army, to M r James Morrison 
Sf merchants friendly to the cause of Liberty, in Montreal, 
18** May 1775. In Gov* Carleton 's Letter of 7 th June 
No. 12. (1.) 

Benedict Arnold to Thomas Walker. 

1775, May 20. Ticonderoga, — Requesting him to give any 
assistance and advice that may be required to Copt. Nineham, 
[Nimhani] who is going on an embassy to Cocknawaugho , 
Copy. 1 folio page. 



310 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Bened* Arnold to 
M r Walker at Montreal; Dated Ticonderoga 20^ May 
1775. In Gov r Carleton's Letter of the 7 th June No. 12. 
(2.) 

Colonel Ethan Allen to the " Councillors at Kocanawago, 
pr favor of Captain Nimham." 

1775, May 24. Crown Point, the head quarters of the army. — 
Recommending Captain Abraham Nimham of Stockbridge as 
Ambassador of Peace to the Indians. Hopes they will not 
fight for King George and against their jriends and brothers 
in the Colonies. Desires their warriors will go and see him and 
help him fight the King's regular troops. Promises money, 
blankets, tomahawks, etc. 
Copy. 2§ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of Ethan Allen's Letter to the Coun- 
cillors of Kocanaivago Dated Crown Point 24 th May 
1775. In Gov r Carletorts Letter of the 7 th June N° 12. 
(3.) 

Benedict Arnold to Thomas Walker. 

1775, May 24. Crown Point. — Asks to be advised from time to 
time of the number of troops with him, their movements, etc. 
Expects to be joined in a few days by 2000 more men. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Bened t Arnold, to 
M r Walker at Montreal. Dated Crown Point 2¥ h May 
1775. In Gov r Carleton's Letter of the 7 June 1775 N° 12. 
(4.) 

Mr. Philips to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 7. — Giving a sketch of a plan for the government of the 
American Provinces. 

Autograph letter. In the third person. 1 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Philips 1775. Ideas of Accomodation with America. 



B. Roberts to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 7. No 21, Tottenham Street, Rathbone Place. 
Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — B. Roberts 1775, on raising a Corps of Canadians. 

William Strahan to Doctor Benjamin Franklin. 

1775, June 7. London. — Hopes the Congress consists of men 
disposed to promote a reconciliation with England, if so, he shall expect 
to see Franklin return with full powers to terminate all differences upon 
reasonable and solid terms. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio 'page. 

Endorsed: — London, June 7, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
William Strahan Esq r to D r Franklin. 



311 

Richard Yates to Messrs. Sargents, Chambers, & Co. 

1775, June 7. New York. — Has lately shipped a quantity of goods 
to his friends Nowlan and Leacocke in Madeira, and ordered them to 
remit Sargents Chambers & Co. the amount, which he imagines will be 
£2000. No alteration for the better in affairs here, but hopes they 
will be no sufferers thereby. 

Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York June 7, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Rich d Yates to Mess rs Sargents Chambers & Co. 

Acting Lieutenant H. Dawson to the Reverend Mr. Goodricke, 
Aldborough, near Boroughbridge, Yorkshire. 

1775, June 8. Boston Camp. — " Dear Uncle, Your apprehensions 
concerning the situation we were in, proved but too true." Hopes Boston 
now understands that the Americans are engaged in a general contest for 
supremacy. Trade is destroyed and the peasants are training for soldiers. 
Frequent skirmishes have taken place but the English are always 
victorious. Details of the affair on Noddles Island. The troops much 
encouraged by the arrival of the three Generals about a fortnight ago. 
Work is difficult and they are in want of fresh provisions. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Boston Camp, June 8, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
L* Dawson to The Rev d M r Goodricke. 

John Morton to Thomas Powell, Merchant, London. 

1775, June 8. Philadelphia. — An entire stoppage to trade is expected 
on the 1st of the next month and preparations are being made for a civil 
war as the people are determined to support the cause of liberty. 
Petitions and remonstrances from London meet with the same fate as 
those from the colonies and are treated as of no consequence. General 
Gage is hemmed in by the provincials at Boston. Calling the Americans 
rebels has made them desperate and they now mean to act as such. 
Arrival of Major Skene Governor of Ticonderoga, Crown Point and the 
Lakes, but as these places have been taken possession of by New England 
men, he has no Government to go to, and is under a guard of American 
militia ; it is expected he will be obliged to show his papers. Sincerely 
wishes reconciliation as the contest is horrible. 

Copy. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philad a 6mo. 8 th 1775. Copy of a Letter from Jn° 
Morton to Tho 9 Powell. 

Peter Renaudet to Ingham Foster. 

1775, June 8. New York. — Deplores the unhappy contest between 
Britain and America and hopes soon to be in Englaud again unless the 
ports should be shut. Account to-day from Boston of a skirmish on Hog 
and Noddle Islands, in which the regulars have lost over 150 men and 
the provincials only one killed and four wounded. Gage still shut up 
in Boston and limited to salt provisions. If affairs continue thus the 
Colonies will soon have 270,000 fighting men. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — New York June 8, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Peter Renaudet to M r Ingham Foster, 



312 

Lord Drummond to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 9. 10 o'clock evening. Whitehall. — Has just seen a letter 
dated Boston 21 April from a gentleman of some importance w ho has 
arrived there from Salem which place he quitted on account of the 
affair of the 19th ; he states that the retreat by Lord Percy was 
deemed a piece of masterly officership in bringing off his men with so 
little loss through a severe and incessant lire for twenty miles ; killed, 
wounded and missing between 80 and 100 including many officers. The 
provincials were endeavouring to cut off communication between the 
town and country and they are computed at 20,000. Lord Percy is in 
good health at General Gage's house. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Drummond 9 th June 1775. Intelligence from Boston. 

Messrs. Gibson and Aston to Messrs. John and Robert 
Barclay, Merchants in London. 

1775, June 9. Philadelphia. — Many skirmishes have happened about 
Boston, much to the disadvantage of the King's troops; the New 
Englanders are strengthening their acquisitions at Ticonderoga and 
Crown Point and they are masters of Lake Champlain, having taken all 
the vessels upon it. The country is now firmly united and preparing 
to contend for their liberties. Major Skene on his arrival found his 
Government taken from him by the Connecticut forces and himself a 
prisoner in Philadelphia. Still hope that the Ministry will stop their 
measures before it is too late to conquer America. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, June 9, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Mess" Gibson & Aston to Mess™ Jn° & Rob* Barclay. 

Mordecai Lewis to Joseph Woods, Whitehart Court, 
Gracechurch Street. 

1775, June 9. Philadelphia. — Fears if measures are not altered at 
home an accommodation will never take place between the two countries. 
Congress is endeavouring to raise men to furnish an array and they 
have appointed a Committee to draw up another Petition to the King, 
an Address to the People of England, one to the Assembly of Jamaica, 
and one to the People of Canada. Many desertions from the General's 
army. Military manoeuvres in Philadelphia. Arrival and arrest of 
Colonel Skene, with seizure of his papers. Generals Howe, Burgoyne 
and Clinton have arrived at Boston, Acts of Parliament by no means 
affect them as they used to. 

Extract. Intercepted. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philad a June 9, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Mordecai Lewis to M r Joseph Woods. 

Alexander Innes to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 10-13. Charles Town. — After the signing, by the 
Members of the Congress, of the association enclosed, it was carried 
round the town by a committee with orders to report all who refused to 
subscribe. Few dared refuse. Raising of troops and other military 
measures decided upon by the Provincial Congress. Several leading 
men here tremble at the lengths already gone and strive to check the 



313 

torrent. Refers him to Captain Barbet for many particulars. Laments 
Admiral Graves's neglect of this province where smuggling goes on daily. 
Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Charles Town, J th June, 1775. M r Innis, Secry to 
L d W m Campbell (private). R/ 3rd August 1775. [And, on a 
icrappcr,~\ 1 p.m. Read by the King. 

Enclosures : — 

1775, June 3, 4, and 6. — Newspaper cutting containing the As- 
sociation subscribed to by the members of the South Carolina 
Provincial Congress 4 June. With Resolutions of the 3 rd and 
6 th June. 

1 printed strip 7%" x2£". 

List of officers for forces raised in South Carolina. 
M.S. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Officers of the South Carolina ff or ces. In M r . 
Innis' 's private letter to Lord Dartmouth 10 June 1775. 

Artillery at Boston. 

1775, June 10. Boston. — John Montresor, Commanding Engineer 
at Head Quarters. Memoranda of Cannon, Workmen, and Works lately 
carried on at Boston, sent to Major General Haldimand. 

Signed by Montresor. 4 folio pages. 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, June 10. Philadelphia. — Gives an account of Major Skene's 
arrival and the seizure of his papers. He and two other officers who 
came with him are prisoners at the City Tavern. Congress yet sitting but 
making slow progress. The New Yorkers making provision to support 
the Pass at Ticonderoga and hinder the Canadians, etc. from piercing 
their country. Desertions from Major Hamilton's corps. Advice given 
by the Continental Congress for the government of Massachusetts 
Bay. Preparation of another petition to the King declaring their 
willingness to grant money by the Assemblies but that they will not 
submit to Parliamentary taxation. 

Copy. Intercepted. 4J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Philadelphia, June 10, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton Esq r . 

Lieutenant Jocelyn Feltham of the 26th Regiment to 
[Major-General Haldimand.] 

1775, June 11 and a few lines on the 12th. New York. — Giving, by 
direction of Captain De La Place of the 26th, a detailed account of the 
surprising of the Fort of Ticonderoga on 10 May and the circumstances 
which followed it. 

Autograph letter signed. 5\ folio pages. 

Enclosures : — 

Crown Point and Ticonderoga. 

1775, May [11] 2c? Thursday. — Resolution of the General 
Assembly of Connecticut appointing a Committee to take care 



314 

Enclosures — cont. 

of and provide for the officers and soldiers taken at Crown 
Point and Ticonderoga and sent into this Colony. 
1 \ folio pages. 

1775, May 10, 11 — Return of the garrison of Ticonderoga made 
prisoners in the Fort on the \0 th May, and of the prisoners 
taken at Crown Point on the following day. With the total 
number of prisoners sent into New England from the two 
garrisons and those taken on both Lakes. Signed Jocelyn 
Felt ham, Lieutenant 26 th Regiment. 
1J folio pages. 

A list of the names of officers, non-commissioned officers and 
soldiers and the places they were taken, i.e., Ticonderoga, Crown 
Point, Lake George and Lake Champlain. 

1 large folio page. 

A list of the persons chiefly concerned in taking the Forts of 
Ticonderoga and Crown Point, His Majesty's Sloop at 
St. Johns, and Fort George, with the names of the places in 
which som,e of them reside. Particulars concerning Benedict 
Arnold, Ethan Allen, who raised what he calls his Green 
Mountain Boys, Colonel Est on, John Brown, and the Rev. — 
Allen, Seth Warner, Baker and Romans, who took possession 
of Fort George and who is an excellent draughtsman, Elisha 
Phelps, Bird and Epaphras Still. 

2 folio pages. 

1775, May 31. Hartfoi % d. — Pass to Lieutenants Arthur Wadman 
and Jocelyn Feltham from the Committee appointed by the 
Connecticut House of Assembly {Erastas Wollcott and seven 
others) allowing them to go to New Jersey and New York 
unmolested to see their friends. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

Joseph Goldthwait to John Blackburn. 

1775, June 11. Boston. — " As to Politicks, I dont know what to say. 
We remain as in my last, still blockaded up." The Congress at 
Philadelphia has voted to make a million of money, and all the 
colonies to be jointly concerned in redeeming it, to carry on the war 
against the Government. Refusal to submit to any Acts of Supremacy 
or Taxation by Parliament. The New England Governments have 
issued Treasurers' notes for payment of the rebel soldiers and those who 
reject them are deemed enemies to their country. 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio page. 

Endorsed: — Boston, 11 June 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
M r Jo s Goldthwait to Jn° Blackburn Esqr. 

Enoch Story to Messrs. John and Robert Barclay. 

1775, June 11. Philadelphia. — The proceedings of the Continental 
Congress kept very secret. A sufficient reinforcement of the Connecticut 
people is supposed to be at Ticonderoga to keep possession of that 
fortress against any attempt of the regulars to retake it. Arrival of 
Captain McCulloch, Major Skene, Lieutenant Moncrief and others. 



^15 

Skene and Moncrief detained as prisoners but now discharged on their 
parole of honour not to cross the Delaware or Schuylkill or go further 
than eight or ten miles north or south of the city. Nothing material 
was discovered by an examination of their papers. 
Extract. Intercepted, 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Philad a 11 th June 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Enoch Story to Mess 1 ' 8 Jn° & Rob* Barclay. 

Major General William Howe to General Harvey. 

1775, June 12 and 18. — "The Situation which The Enemy has 
taken in Forming the Blockade, is Judicious & Strong, being well 
Intrenched where The Situation Requires it, & with Cannon." His 
reasons for not attacking them, the needs of his army and refusal of 
the colonies to supply him. Intelligence scanty and only through 
rebels, so is ignorant of the doings in the neighbourhood. States his 
ideas of the measures desirable to be taken on Dorchester Neck and 
Roxbury and other places and the force required. 

Extract. 5 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract from a Letter from Boston 12 June 1775. 
Gen. Howe to Gen 1 Harvey. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. 

Major General William Howe to Lord Howe. 

1775, June 12. Boston.—" In consequence of the defection at New 
York a Frigate has been sent to bring the 4 Regiments destined for 
that Province to this Port." The situation of the rebels for continuing 
the blockade of this town is exceedingly strong; gives particulars 
respecting their numbers, manner of fighting and position. Disad- 
vantages under which the British troops labour. Details of the taking 
of Fort Ticonderoga. Gives his ideas of the measures able to be taken 
in their present situation, showing he has no great hopes of doing 
much this campaign with the present force. Is in great want of 
frigates and states the army required for the province of New York and 
the garrison of Boston and how to furnish the same. 

Copy in Lord Howe's hand. 5| folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Gen 1 Howe to Lord Howe. 

Brigadier General James Robertson to [ ]. 

1775, June 13. Boston. — "A Gentleman lately sent to Philadelphia 
brought me the inclosed, which I consider as the best Intelligence he 
brought." The Congress here has struck money and is severe against 
those who refuse it. Mr. Burgoyne had a good share in framing the 
General's proclamation. People say there is more attention paid to 
style than to policy. The Irish transports with troops are arriving. 
" The Rebels lie round the Town and our Boats make it in a manner all 
land round us." Nothing less than a decisive victory will alter the face 
of affairs. Prescot sails to-morrow for Quebec. 

Copy. \\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from B. Gen 1 Robertson, dated Boston 
13 th June, 1775, with a Letter addressed to him from Philadelphia 
of 25 th May. 



316 

Enclosure : — 

] to Brigadier General Robertson. 

1775, May 25. — The affair at Lexington has given such ideas of 

New England prowess that the Americans will listen to no 

terms but such as they themselves shall dictate. Delega tes 

from the New England colonies declare openly against a ny 

Law of Parliament binding them in any respect. Congress 

proceedings. " It was said, and I believe truly, that Dr. Franklin 

came out as an agent from Lord Chatham, to propose certain 

Terms, ivhich he would push at home . . . We fear Lord 

Chatham: he is for having the supremacy acknowledged . . . . 

Lord North's Motion would be slavery." The taking of Ticon- 

deroga has given great spirit to the Americans. New York has 

out-heroded Herod ; its delegates are still the ablest in Congress. 

They hate the New Englanders. Strange and fabulous stories 

told of the provincials and the troops. 

Copy . 3 1 folio pag es . 

Lieutenant Robert Tomlinson to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, Juiie 13. — Fears in the present situation of American affairs 
many men will vent their odious and baneful spite against his Lordship. 
Is desirous of finding an antidote for their poison, and if facts are given 
him, he will readily exert all his powers to avert the pernicious 
consequences which evil surmising and artful falsehoods might 
occasion. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Lieut* Tomlinson 13 June 1775. 

Lieutenant J[ocelyn] F[eltham] to [Major General 
Frederick Haldimand]. 

1775, June 14. York. — Account of the seizure of Ensign Morland 
when sitting with him in his lodgings the previous night, by a party of more 
than twenty armed men, Mr. Broome and Mr. Sears being the principal, 
who sent him a prisoner to Hartford in Connecticut because of his 
alleged communication with Major Skene at Philadelphia. 

Autograph letter signed, § folio page. 

Endorsed: — Letters from M r Feltham concerning the taking of 



■& 



Ticonderoga &c. and other Matters for Gen 1 Aldemand. 



n 



Cabinet Minute. 

1775, June 15. — Held at Lord North's. Agreed: — To submit to 
His Majesty that the opinion of the meeting is to augment the force 
under General Gage, from Great Britain, Ireland and Canada. With a 
paper headed " Agenda " relative to New Jersey, the West Indies and 
St. John's. 

In Lord Dartmouth's hand. 3^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Agenda. 

Lieutenant Joceltn Feltham to [Major General 
Frederick Haldimand]. 

1775, June 15. York. — One Angus McDonald late a Corporal in 
the 26th Regiment has been before the Congress now sitting in this 



317 

place. He has been sent prisoner to Hartford, letters, it is said, having 
been given up by him (" but I rather imagine they have taken them ") 
from Major Small and Captain McDonald. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, June 15. Philadelphia. — Is intimately acquainted with the 
members of the Congress and is assured they wish for a re-establishment 
of peace and harmony between Britain and America but are determined 
to be prepared for the worst as they have voted men and money to 
carry on the war. The Connecticut people have seized stores belonging 
to the King near New York. Has been informed that Lord Dunmore 
has left the castle and taken refuge on board a man of war. Reports of 
the circumstances attending this action, 

Copy. Intercepted. 3£ folio pages. 

Endorsed .— Philad a June 15, 1775. Copy of a Letter from M r Tho s 
Wharton to Sam 1 Wharton Esq r . 

Bunker's Hill. 

1775, June 17. — A sketch of the action between the British forces 
and the American provincials, on the heights of the peninsula of 
Charlestown. 

Printed arid coloured. 1 sheet. 

1775, June 17. — A list of officers killed and wounded on Saturday 
17 June 1775. Total army killed and wounded 1,041. 
1% folio pages. 

Endorsed : — List of the Killed and Wounded at Bunker's Hill. June 
17, 1775. 



James Hutton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 19. King's lload, Chelsea, opposite Mrs. Hutchins's 
Farm.— Accounts from the Ohio shew the willingness of the Delaware 
Indians to receive the Gospel through the instrumentality of Captain 
White Eye. They also with their land to be secured to them by the 
King and for that purpose resolved to send this Captain to England. 
He comes with good recommendations and was to set out on 2 March 
for Pittsburg on his way to England. Hutton will be glad of an inter- 
view with his Lordship on this subject, as he hopes it will be properly 
treated because it greatly affects the missionaries' .influence in their 
country. 

Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed {on the back of his note of the 26th) : — M r Hutton concerns 
White Eye. 19 June 1775. 



Lord Percy to [ ]. 

1775, June IP. Boston. — Informs him of the victory over the rebels 
by General Howe on the 17th instant after an obstinate engagement. 
Gives details of the great loss sustained by them though number not yet 



318 

certainly known. Enemy's loss over 300. He was not personally 
engaged in the action being on duty in the lines that day, but his 
regiment is almost cut to pieces being one of the first to attack. 
Copy . 1 \ quarto pages . 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from L d Piercy. Boston June 19, 
1775, relative to the Engagement on Bunkers Hill. 

Cabinet Minutes. 

1775, June 21. — Meeting held at Lord North's house. In Lord 
Dartmouth's hand. General Carleton is to raise 2000 Canadians to 
be employed as Light Infantry under Gage. Highlanders to be sent 
to America and Regiments from Gibraltar and Minorca to join them. 

1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Minutes of Cabinet, 21 June 1775. Ex. 



John Florry to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1775, June 22. Cleobury near Bewdley. — Considers his bullets 
would be of great service in America at the present time. He has 
thought of a method of taking prisoners which he will disclose to his 
Lordship if there is any chance of a reasonable recompense being 
granted him. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — John Flory 22 June 1775, on his Invention of Bullets. 



James Hutton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 23. King's Road, Chelsea. — In order to save time on 
Monday communicates the substance of his letters and dispatches. 
Account of the disputes between the Shawenese and Delawares and recon- 
ciliation through the mediation of Captain White Eye. Their decision 
to receive the Gospel and desire to have their land confirmed to them ; 
for the latter purpose the Captain is coming to England with recom- 
mendations from Lord Dunmore and others. Hopes he will be kindly 
treated and obtain his object. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 



Lord Hyde to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 23. — Not having yesterday had the honour and satis- 
faction of conversing with His Lordship, ventures to scratch out in the 
greatest hurry some ideas which his zeal would not let him suppress 
and which he hopes will concur with His Lordship's opinion. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Ideas respecting America. On the top of this is written " An 
Appendix to a former importunity" In Lord Hyde's hand. 
" A great part of the nation, notwithstanding the workings 8? 
influence oj opposition } is suspended in opinion on the outrages 
of America fy on the proceedings of government." The press 



319 

Enclosure — cont. 

well employed is often of use. News received from Canada 
suggest that that province might be serviceable to check the 
rebels. 

4 2 folio pages. 

Captain Laurie to [ ]. 

1775, June 23. Camp on Charles Town Heights. 
Copy, 2\ large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Capt" Laurie Of the 43 d Regim*. 
With an Account of the Battle on Bunker's Hill, and his opinion 
respecting America. 



[Paul Went worth] to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 24. — With reference to some ' tho'ts towards forming 
a plan of operations in America.' [Query : May this be the undated 
paper under Paul Wentworth's name placed at the end of this year, 
' Ideas which may be woven into a plan ' etc.] 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Anon. 24 June 1775. Sup. P. W—th Esq r . 

Frederick, Bishop op Derry, to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, June 25, Derry. — "A Vessel is this very moment arriv'd at 
our Quay in 28 days from Philadelphia & brings letters from thence ": — 
These letters are replete with exultation on their success against the 
Fort of Ticonderoga. Congress is determined that all American ports 
should be shut on the 20 th July and New York and North Carolina had 
determined not to avail themselves of the privilege granted them 
by Parliament. Universal armament in America and the colonies 
unanimous in defence of American freedom. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^- quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Bp of Derry 25 June 1775, with a Note of Intelligence 
from America. 



Lieutenant -General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 25. Boston. — No. 33. Account of the storming of the 
battery raised by the rebels on Charlestown Point on the 17th instant. 
Sends a list of killed and wounded. The success of the day in a great 
measure to be attributed to Brigadier General Pigot. 

Copy. 4 J folio pages. 

Endorsed .-—Copy of a Letter from the Hon ble Lieu* Gen 1 Gage, to 
the Earl of Dartmouth, dated Boston 25 th June 1775 (N°33) R/25th 
July. 



Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 25 No. 34. The last transport of the first embarkation 

from Ireland landed her troops at this port on the 19th instant, and 422 



Oil 



recruits &c. have arrived under the command of Major Bruce. Has 
heard that a motion was made in the Congress at Philadelphia for con- 
ciliatory measures with Great Britain ; has also been informed that Lord 
Dunmore and his family have been compelled to take refuge on board 
the " Fowey " ship of war ; doubts the first item, but thinks the latter 
authentic. There is scarcely a province that has not overthrown its 
Government and all power is lodged in the hands of Congresses and 
Committees; the people are so blind and " bigotted " that they cannot 
see they have exchanged liberty for tyranny. No advices received 
from Canada for three months past, though he has sent there for 
supplies of all kinds. 
Copy. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from The Hon ble Lieu* Gen 1 Gage, to 
The Earl of Dartmouth, dated Boston 25 th June 1775. (N° 34.) 
R/ 25 th July. 



Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 25. — Private. Wishes that the success, so necessary, had 
not cost so dear. The number of killed and wounded is greater than they 
could afford to lose. The rebels are shown not to be the disorderly 
rabble too many have supposed. They have fortified all the heights 
and passes around the town. It will be perceived that the conquest of 
the country is not easy and can be effected only by time and persever- 
ance and strong armies attacking it in various quarters and so dividing 
their forces. In all their wars against the French they have showed no 
such conduct, attention and perseverance as they do now. The people's 
minds are kept heated and inflamed and they do not see they have 
exchanged liberty for tyranny. No people were ever governed more 
absolutely than the American Provinces now are, and no reason can be 
given for their submission but that it is a tyranny they have erected 
themselves. 

Copy. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Hon ble Lieu* Gen 1 Gage, to 
the Earl of Dartmouth, dated Boston 25 th June 1775. Private, 



R/ 25 th July. 



Governor Guy Carleton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 26. Montreal. — No. 13. Martial law proclaimed and 
militia enrolled. Movements of the enemy. Letter he has received 
from General Gage, empowering him to draw for money, and putting 
all the upper posts under his immediate command. The effect ten or 
twelve thousand men would have here. Letters received from Colonel 
Guy Johnson at Fort Stanwix, who tells of important communication 
threatened from the Susquehannah and applies for provisions, ammu- 
nition, blankets, and a small body of troops necessary to encourage the 
Indians to persevere in the British interest. 

Copy. 4 folio pages. [The original signed letter is in the Public 
Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, Vol. 1 1, fo. 62.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Governor Carleton to the Earl 
of Dartmouth dated Montreal 26 th June 1775. (N° 13.) R/ 
29 th July. 



321 

Enclosure : — 

1775, June 24. Montreal. — State of His Majesty's Troops in 
the Province of Quebec commanded by His Excellency Major 
General Guy Carleton. 

Copy. 3 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — From Copy in Gov r Carleton' s (N° 13) of 26 
June 1775. 



Alexander Fraser, Midshipman on the <; Scarborough " 
Man-of-War, to [ ]. 

1775, June 26. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. — The battle pre- 
viously mentioned by him has produced as yet no visible consequences 
though it is the general opinion the rebels are sick of the service as 
they are not able to cope with the troops. A reported division in the 
Continental Congress. Samuel Adams and John Hancock have been 
excepted from the pardon offered by General Gage's proclamation to all 
who shall lay down their arms; some have availed themselves of this 
offer but great numbers hesitate through fear of being taken in the 
attempt. Present distressed condition of the country. Insufficient 
force on the English side to reduce the rebels as every skirmish 
diminishes it while they are continually increasing in numbers. 
Unwarrantable acts of violence committed. They have robbed the 
different forts of the cannon and ammunition and forced the governor 
with his family to leave the town. 

Extract. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Extract of a Letter from M r Frazer a Midshipman in 
the Navy at Portsmouth N. Hampshire, dated 26 th June 1775. 
On the Skirmish at Bunker's Hill. Ex. 



James Hutton to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 26, Monday. — Begs to know when Capt, White Eye 
arrives. If there were any of the messengers at whose house he and 
Montour could be lodged much mischief might be prevented. Suggests 
providing clothing, that they might not attract attention. These were 
the principal matters about which he had intended to speak to-day to his 
Lordship. 

Note in the third person. 1 page. 



Sir Egerton Leigh to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, June 26. Saville Row. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — S 1 ' Egerton Leigh 26 June 1775, proposing the Resig- 
nation of his Seat in the Council of S° Carolina, if necessary. 

William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, June 27, Tuesday. America Square. — Has several letters of 
consequence to communicate to his Lordship at a convenient oppor- 
tunity. A ship of his arrived yesterday from America having spoken 

y 82140. X 



322 

with seven sail of transports on 17 May bound for New York with 
droops and expected to arrive there about the 24th May. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — W. Molleson Esq r 27 June 1775, inclosing the Pro- 
ceedings of the Maryland Convention. 

Enclosure : — 

Maryland. 

1 775, April 24 — 3 May . — Printed Proceedings of a meeting of 
the Deputies of the Counties of Maryland held at Annapolis 
on the 24 th April and continued by adjournment from day to 
day to the 3 d of May. 
2 folio pages. 

Major Gavin Cochrane to Sir Adolphus Oughton. 

1775, June 28. Duke's Court. — Seeing accounts in the newspapers 
that the people of New England have made themselves masters of 
Crown Point and Ticonderoga, where he commanded four years, offers 
some observations on their situation and condition. Their importance 
because commanding the communication between Canada and New 
York, also with the New England provinces. Describes the forts. 
The principal reason for having garrisons at these posts was to keep up 
the communication. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .-—Major Cochran to S r Ad. Oughton 28 th June, 1775. 
Hints respecting Crown Point & Ticonderoga. 

Congress. Rules for the Government of the Troops. 

1775 ; June 30. Philadelphia. — Printed pamphlet entitled — Rules 
and Articles for the better Government of the Troops Raised or to be 
raised and kept in pay by and at the joint Expense of the Twelve United 
English Colonies of North America. Signed, by order of the Congress, 
John Hancock, President. 

17 octavo pages, sewn. 

Governor Josiaii Martin to Lord Dart310uth. 

1775, June 30. Fort Johnston, North Carolina, — No. 34. Details 
circumstances that have occurred in his province since his last letter, 
showing the spirit of the people, his own personal danger, assistance 
given by General Gage, and his removal from Newbern. States the 
measures necessary to be taken to restore order in the province. Pro- 
posal to raise a battalion of 1,000 Highlanders there. Refers to the 
enclosures. South Carolina Congress has sent recruiting parties into 
North Carolina. Believes that nothing short of the rod of correction 
will bring back the Americans to obedience. Remarks on the Council 
and M r Dry Collector of Customs at Fort Johnston. 

Duplicate letter signed. 16| large folio pages. [The original signed 
letter is in the Public Record Office, Series America and West Indies, 
Vol. 222, fo. 253.] 

Endorsed: — North Carolina. Fort Johnston. 30 June 1773. 
Governor Martin. N° 34 (Duplicate original not rec d .) R. 
Sept r 10 1775 (3 Inclosures) Ent d . 



323 

Enclosures : — 

North Carolina. Minutes of Council. 

1775, June 25. Fort Johnston. — Address of the Governor 
relative to the audacious and dangerous proceedings in the 
province and inviting advice as to the measures to be adopted 
to support the King's rights. The condition of Fort Johnston 
being reported on, the Council advise applying to Gen I. Gage 
and their opinion is that the meeting of the Assembly be 
postponed to a future day as from the example of the other 
colonies there is not any probability of their proceeding to 
business. 

Copy certified by Josiah Martin. 3j folio pages. 

Endorsed: — In Gov r Martin's of the 30 of June, 177 \ 
No 34. 

North Carolina. 

ND. [1775, May 31.] — Resolutions (20) of a Committee of 
the county of Mecklenburgh in North Carolina. Signed at 
Charlotte Town, by order of the Committee, Ephraim 
Brevard. Suspending all laics and commissions given by the 
Croxcn and proposing measures to establish a government for 
the province. 
4 folio pages. 

Endorsed :< — In Gov 7 ' Martins of the 30 of June, 177 5. 
^34. 

[ The third enclosure is not now with the letter.~\ 

Intelligence. 

[1775, June.] — Paper in John Pownall's hand, endorsed "Intelligence." 
Sir Stanier Porten has just been here to communicate the following 
Intelligence, viz. : — That 3 battalions of French, lately in garrison at 
Lisle, were ordered to be at Brest on the 22 d of June to embark for the 
West Indies. Four more battalions from France to follow. The 
Spanish fleet sailed from Carthagena on the 23 d June but on the 24 th 
they were only three leagues from the coast, owing to the easterly 
winds. Monsieur Bulkeley and Count D'Estaing have requested 
of Monsieur de Muy to serve on board the Spanish Flota but have 
been refused on the ground that the Court of France does not know the 
object of its destination. 

1^ quarto pages. 

[Royal Highland Emigrants Regiment.] 

N. D. [1775, June], — Letter not signed, dated, nor addressed ; 
beginning — " Sir I hope your Excellency will have the goodness to 
pardon the liberty I take, in troubling you on a Subject, which has 
been revealed to me in Confidence, by my friend Major Small.*' Owing 
to the great influx of Highlanders into this province, proposes the 
enlisting of them into a brigade. Shows the desirability of such a step 
at the present juncture of affairs. Offers himself as commander of such 
a brigade if another is not destined for the pest. 

Copy. 3| folio pages. 

x 2 



324 

Virginia. 

N. D. [1775, June]. — Address of the Council of Virginia to all the 
good people of the Province. Can no longer forbear to express their 
abhorrence and detestation of the ungovernable spirit which misleads 
the once happy people of this country. Desire the consequences to be 
considered. The Council on this occasion wish to be looked upon not 
as a separate body of men, but as the watchful guardians of the rights 
of the people. Will heartily join with them in whatever means ma)* be 
judged most salutary for enforcing obedience to the laws. 

Copy. 1 page. [A printed broadside is in the Public Record Office, 
series America and West Indies, Vol. 213, fo. 427.] 

Endorsed: — Address of Council of Virginia to the People. 



Edward Fisher to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 1. Mr. Chapman's, Cheap Street, Bath. — Quotes from a 
letter written on the 12th May by his brother John Fisher showing the 
confused state of affairs in America since the action of 19 April, and 
who as he is Collector of Customs at Salem and in personal danger from 
the populace, asks leave and opportunity to embark for England. 
Desires his Lordship to intercede with Lord North on his brother's 
behalf. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Fisher. Bath 1 July 1775. To Lord Dartmouth 
desiring Leave of Absence for his Brother. 



Is. Seagrove to John Blackburn. 

1775, July 2. New York. — In consequence of England's rejecting 
the remonstrance and petition sent from the colonies to redress the 
grievances, the Americans are determined to defend their liberty by a 
vigorous opposition. Preparations for war. Non-importation stoutly 
adhered to and non-exportation daily expected. Not less than 2,000 
lives have been lost since the 19th April. Saw the action at Lexington, 
which was a hot one. Not less than 1,500 fell in the attack on Breed's 
Hill ; a general engagement may be hourly expected. Washington, 
Lee, Ward and Putnam are in command of the American army. It is 
said General Carleton is coming down from Canada with an army of 
Indians and French ; a strong army is posted at Ticonderoga to intercept 
him. Wishes he were in England as he has no relish for civil war. 

Copy. Intercepted. 3 folio pages and 2 lines. 

Endorsed: — New York, July 2 d 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
I s Seagrove to Jn° Blackburn Esq r . 



The Keverend Doctor John Ewing to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 3. No. 25, Ludgate Street. — On the desirability of 
granting the request stated in the enclosed memorial. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — D 1 ' Ewing 3 d July 1775, inclosing Petition to the 
King. 



Enclosure : — 



325 



Petition to the King. 



1775, July 3. London. — From, the Reverend Doctor John Ewing 
and Doctor Hugh Williamson (tivo of the Trustees of the 
Academy of Newark in the County of Newcastle upon 
Delaware). Desiring a grant of a tract of land towards the 
establishment and support of their Seminary to assist in 
diffusing Christianity among parts now much neglected and 
strengthening and preserving their allegiance to the King at 
this critical time as well as in the future. 

Original. Signed. {Both signatures in one hand, not Ewing\s, 
probably D r Williamson 's.) I large folio page. 

Endorsed : — D r E wing's Petition. 

Alexander Innes to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 3. Charles Town. —Remarks on the disposition and 
conduct of the people of this province. Had he known affairs would 
have come to this climax, and Lord William [Campbell] been deserted 
by those who ought to support him, he would not have ventured to 
undertake the task he has done, but till it can be more ably filled, he 
will endeavour to do his best therein. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Innes Chailestown 3 July 1775, respecting public 
Affairs in So. Carolina. M r Innis Charlestown 3 July 1775. 

Lord Hyde to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 4. — " L d Hyde presents his respects to L d Dartmouth ; 
who will be convinced by the inclosed ideas how little his Lp lost by not 

being at home when L d H. called at his door." Lord H 's zeal 

renders him over officious but he begs his minutes may be confined to 
Lord Dartmouth and Lord North. 

Autogr .ph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Hyde 4 July 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

Lord Howe to Lord Hyde. 

1775, [June 29]. Thursday night, Grafton Street. — " As your 
wishes, my D r Lord, will always have with me the force of com- 
mands, I give you upon paper as much as J can recollect of 
the substance of what I had the honor to state to your Lordship 
in the Drawing Room.'" Respecting the Bill expected to be 
offered the following day f>r restraining the Fishery and other 
export trade of Massachusetts Bay. 

Autograph letter signed. 4^ quarto pages. The end of this 
letter is written {apparently by mistake) on the back of one 
from Lord Hyde to Lord Howe of 10 February 1775. 

Donald McLean to Timothy Bevan, Druggist, Lombard Street. 

1775, July 4, New York. — " You cannot possibly form a proper 
Idea of the convulsed State of the Colonies at this very juncture,": — I 



326 

is feared that the sinew of trade is already broken and only anarchy and 
confusion stare the land in the face. 
Extract. Intercepted. J folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York July 4, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Don d M c Lean to M r Timothy Bevan. 

William Smith to Major- General Frederick Haldimand, 

1775, July 4. New York. — " Sir, I have the Honor to inclose the 
MSS. you desired to peruse ; and by the Absence of my best Clerk, 
am obliged to apologise for so bad a Copy." Leaves town early in the 
morning and wishes Haldimand an agreeable voyage. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Thoughts upen the Dispute between Great Britain and her 
Colonies. Written in 1767. Beginning " They who speak of 
the Union between these Countries, barely as of Importance 
. . . do not express themselves properly" 
Copy. S\ folio pages. [For a similar paper purporting to 
be b?/ Brook Watson see above 23 January. See also at the 
end' of 1774.] 

Copy of the same endorsed : — Thoughts upon the Dispute between 
G. Britain & the Colonies, written by Mr. Wm, Smith of N. York in 
1767. 

14 pages. 

A. Z. to the Reverend John Vardil[l]. 

1775, July 5. New York. — " It is said that a Motion has been made 
at the Continental Congress for an Independency, which occasioned 
very warm Debates." Captain John Hansen, who lately discovered some 
of the secrets of the French Cabinet, for which he received a pension 
of £500, has now it is said discovered that the English Ministry are in 
league with the Pretender, who must this year assert his right to the 
throne, or be for ever barred. This is supposed to be the reason of the 
present measures respecting America, that by drawing the forces out of 
Great Britain and Ireland those countries will be subject to the 
incursions of the Pretender. Of the Provincial Officers not one in ten 
have ever smelt gunpowder. Repeats sentiments declared by the people 
on the present state of affairs. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2| folio pages. 

John Harris Cruger to Henry Cruger, Junior. 

1775, July 5. New York. — " It is with the greatest Pleasure I 
communicate to you the honourable Mention that is made of you in 
your Support and Defence of our Assembly's Memorial and Remonstrance 
to the Lords.'' The treatment of this remonstrance has irritated and 
oreatly vexed many of the moderate well-disposed people and will hasten 
on the scene of confusion, ruin and anarchy. Is anxious to hear the 
fate of their petition though despairs of a favourable reception. This 



327 

city wears a warlike appearance. Ha? received no certain account of 
Bunker's Hill battle, only newspaper accounts. 
Copy. Intercepted. 2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — New York, July 5, 1775. Copy of a Letter from John 
Harris Cruger Esq r to Henry Cruger jun r Esq r . 

Messrs. McFarran and Ddnlap to Messrs, Johnston and Canning. 

1775, July 5. New York. — " When Trade will be open again it is 
uncertain, for People here are determined not to give Way." Considers 
England cannot subdue them by land, but only destroy their towns by 
her men of war, and an army marching from under their cover will run 
a great risk of being massacred. 

Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Endorsed: — New York, July 5, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Mess rs M e Farran & Dunlap to Mess rs Johnston & Canning. 

John Weatherhead to Charles Williamos Esq., St. James's Place. 

1775, July 5. New York. — "Mr. Skeene's promises must appear 
very highly contemptible to the Ministry, when they are informed that 
he is a Pri.-oner still in the Hands of the Philadelphians." His whole 
family have been dispersed and his effects destroyed by the very people 
he has been recommending to the favours of the Crown. Ethan Allen 
and Seth Warner are now parading the streets of New York, notwith- 
standing that £500 is offered by Act of Assembly for securing their 
persons. Considers a squadron of small ships of war and 4.000 good 
regular troops would soon strike terror into the Southern Colonies and 
"put to flight the rebellious scoundrels in this Province," providing 
the Admiral and General are active enterprising men. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — New York, 5 July 1775. Extract of a Letter from John 
Weatherhead to Charles Williamos Esq r . 

John Bayard to John Sargent, Downing Street. 

1775, July 6. Greenwich. — " Our Situation is as melancholly and 
shocking as pen can describe it. Where it will end G'»d alone knows." 
Anarchy and Blood will be the production of this dismal year unless 
Government should step in and send to this country proper persons to 
meet and treat with deputies from the different assemblies to settle the 
differences between the two countries. 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio page. 

Endorsed : — Greenwich, 6 July 1775. Extract of a Letter from Jn° 
Bayard to Jn° Sargent Esq r . 

Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 6. Fort Johnston, North Carolina. — No. 35. Receipt 
of dispatches by Captain Tollemache. Disadvantages experienced by 
not being able to communicate with General Gage. No communication 
by sea yet established by the Admiral or General and all intercourse, by 
land is cut off by the vigilance of the Committees, " A servant of mine, 



328 

whom I had dispatched from hence to the Post Office at Wilmington for 
my letters three days ago, was stopped by the Committee at the little 
Town of Brunswick, who obliged him to swear, that he had no letters 
forme, before he was suffered to proceed." Regrets that his Lordship's 
dispatches had been previously opened by the mob at Charlestown as 
certified by Mr. Roupell, Deputy Post Master General there. Enu- 
merates several letters by the " Sandwich " Packet that his Lordship 
may judge whether any have been suppressed. Introduces Mr. Schaw 
and refers his Lordship to him for information of this province. Thinks 
recent orders respecting the authority of Major and Brigadier-Generals 
will bear somewhat hard upon himself, though he will not fail to have 
them fulfilled. 

Duplicate autograph letter signed. 5 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — North Carolina Fort Johnston. 6 July 1775. Gov r 
Martin. N° 35. (Duplicate origin 1 not rec d .) Rec d 10 Sept r 
1775. Ent d . 



John Williams to Loud Dartmouth. 

1775, July 6. No. 7, Furnival's Inn. — Appears to have been engaged 
in the customs in America. Begs his Lordship to interpose on his 
behalf with Lord North to " obtain the prayer of his petition." 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Williams 6 July, 1775, explaining his distressed 
Situation and enclosing a Petition. 



Walter and Thomas Buchanan and Co. to Messrs. George 
and John Buchanan, Glasgow. 

1775, July 7 and 8. New York. — It has been decided to shut up 
the ports on the 10th September, unless something is done by the man- 
of-war to oblige them to alter their sentiments. Do not find that any 
other house here has any advice of this matter. Are convinced that the 
first vessel that is stopped going from America by virtue ot the Re- 
straining Act will cause all the ports to be shut, or if a man-of-war 
take any vessel loaded with provisions and carry her to Boston it will 
result in the same action. 

Extract. Intercepted. I \ folio pages. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 7. New York. — The idea of Parliamentary taxation is 
the heavy clog that keeps the Americans from vigorously supporting 
Government. Were this accommodated numbers would stand forth in 
its cause. Hopes his intended answer to the Corporation of this 
City will meet with his Lordship's approbation. Desires leave of 
absence by the next packet with discretionary leave to remain if affairs 
require his presence, 

Autograph letter signed. SJolto pages. 

Endorsed :— Gov r Tryon, 7 tL July, 1775. On the Prospect of Affairs 
in N. York. 



329 

Same as the foregoing. A signed letter only. 

Endorsed: — Opinion of the only Means of quieting the Americans. 
l^ folio pages. 

Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 7. New York. — In the delicate state of his health and 
public situation and it being very probable ho may either be taken 
prisoner as a state hostage, or obliged to retire on board one of His 
Majesty's ships of war to avoid the insolence of an inflamed mob, 
humbly requests discretionary leave to return to England and that it 
may be sent by the next packet. He will make no hasty or improper 
use of such grace. 

Duplicate letter signed. 1 folio page. [The autograph signed 
letter is in the Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, 
Vol. 185, fo. 423.] 

Endorsed: — Gov r Tryon, N. York, 7 July, 1775. Praying a 

discretionary Leave of Absence. 
Again endorsed : — Gov r Tryon July 1775. 

Benjamin Moore to the Reverend Doctor Cooper 
at Dr. Thurloe's, Temple. 

1775, July 8. King's College. — " Our Situation grows more & more 
distressing. The City is held in a constant Alarm." The Connecticut 
Troops about 1,800 are encamped near Mr. Elliott's. Various false 
rumours are constantly being spread concerning the movements of the 
troops. It has been suggested that the college be converted into a 
hospital and Doctor Clossy Physician General to the American army. 
Governor Tryon is viewed with a supercilious eye, though he behaves 
with much prudence and moderation. The Corporation were prohibited 
by the Provincial Congress from presenting their address to Governor 
Tryon. 

Extract. Intercepted. \\ folio pages. 

Governor Thomas Shirley to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 10. Dominica. — " M r Robert Temple, who will have 
the honour of delivering this Letter to your Lordship ; is a Gentleman 
lately arrived here from Boston in his way to England. " Commends 
him to his Lordship's attention as one conversant with American 
affairs but who has been obliged to quit his home and family on account 
of service rendered to the King's troops in the skirmish of the 19th 
April. 

Letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— Gov* Shirley 10 July 1775. 

Lord Viscount Townshend to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 11. Portman Square. — Requests the loan of Captain 
Holland's plan of the town of Boston and its environs for a few days. 
Original. Not autograph. In the third person. -|- quarto page. 

Endorsed: — L d Vise* Townshend 11 July 1775, on the Subject of 
Ordnance Stores for America. 



330 

Enclosure : — 

Account of Ordnance at Quebec and Montreal. 
J quarto page. 

Lord Viscount Townshend to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, July 11. Portman Square. — If more ordnance stores are 
required, suggests that they could be spared from Boston, as General 
Gage has more than he can possibly use for Quebec and Virginia, The 
artillery, small arms and stores are all ready for embarkation as ordered. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto jmge. 

Lord Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 12. The "Fowey." — Mr. Corbin, Senior, is one of th© 
most influential loyalists in the colony, and his son leaves America 
entirely on account of the disturbances, having found his life in danger 
because he would not join the provincials. He is well informed of the 
transactions in this colony. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — L d Dunmore July 1775, recommending M r Corbin of 
Virginia. 

The Duke of Chandos to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 13. Acrington. — Highly recommending Captain Shaw 
who has resided for several years past ai Winchester, and whose two sons 
are now serving His Majesty at Boston under General Gage. 

Autograph letter signed. 1| quarto pages. 

indorsed: — D. of Chandos 13 July 1775, recommending Capt. Shaw. 

Colonel T. Howard to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, July 14. White Hall. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — Col 1 Howard 14 July 1775, desiring a vacant Reg* for 
his friend Gov 1 ' Tryon. 

Cadw^allader Colden, Junior, to the Reverend Doctor 

Myles Cooper. 

1775, July 15. Coldengham. — "If any one has dared to put Pen to 
Paper to give you a State of Affairs in this Province since you left us it 
must fill your sympathetic Breast with the greatest anxiety to hear of the 
great Progress of— — — I know not what to call it, in so much that 
no one dare now print, w T ritc or speak a word in favour of Government." 
His life and property threatened till he was compelled to sign the 
Association Paper. Some who refused to do so tied hand and foot and 
sent down to the Provincial Congress. All Church men in this part of 
the country have appeared averse to the public measures and are 
consequently called Tories. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. Is in a wrapper marked 
Communications from M r Todd* Oct. 11. 

* Secretary of the General Post Office. 



331 



Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 15. "Cruizer" Sloop of War, Cape Fear River, North 
Carolina. — No. 36. Gives account of Howe's victory at Bunker's 
Hill as received from the master of a vessel just arrived from Boston. 
Pernicious influence of printed papers circulated by rebels. Is eager for 
intelligence and supplies from General Gage ; it is rumoured that the 
Committee at Wilmington have intercepted General Gage's letter to him. 
Captain Collets' just representations that he could not hold Fort John- 
ston with three or four men against a multitude have determined him to 
dismount the artillery and lay it under cover of the " Cruizer's " guns. 
The fort a contemptible thing. Cornelius Harnett, John A. she, Robert 
Howes or Howe and Abner Nash are the persons who lend the revolt 
in his province and who he proposes should be proscribed the same 
as Samuel Adams and John Hancock in Massachusetts have been by the 
King's proclamation. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 J large folio pages. 

Endorsed : — North Carolina. Cruiser Sloop of War Cape Fear 
River. 15 July 1775. Gov 1 ' Martin. (N° 36.) R/ 10 Sept 1 ' 
1775. Ent d . 



John Gibson to Messrs. John and Robert Barclay. 

1775, July 18. Philadelphia. — General Gage by carrying the 
Trenches at Bunker's Hill has gained perhaps 1,000 acres of ground by 
the victory of the 17th but he is as closely besieged as before the arrival 
of troops from England and Ireland. The Continental Congress has 
announced the resolution of the country to defend itself against the 
arbitrary Acts of Parliament ; it has taken the reins of Government, 
and implicit obedience is paid to its decrees. If no response is made to 
the last petition sent to the King, Independency will be looked forward 
to and a European Power asked for assistance if required. Harvest 
generally in ; every kind of produce has yielded abundance this year. 

Extract. Intercepted, lj folio pages. 

Governor Lord William Campbell to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, July 19, last part on 20 th . Charles Town. — No. 2. Detriment 
to the province by General Gage's neglect to se^nd vessels for his 
assistance. Every hour he hears of vessels from the Dutch and French 
settlements arriving and smuggling cargoes in the neighbouring creeks. 
His reasons for not dissolving the Assembly. " The Assembly met 
the 10 th . The Papers inclosed contain every thing that has pass'd 
& shows (sic) plainly the temper that reigns amongst them. When I 
received their Address I thought of dissolving them immediately, but I 
soon found that was what they wish'd ; it would have furnished a fresh 
grievance, & an excuse for every violent, desperate, measure that 
might be adopted in their Committees, & Councils. They would have 
immediately said, that by a Dissolution at such a Crisis I had inflamed 
the minds of the people, weakned Goverment, & riot, anarchy, & 
confusion, could not fail of being the consequence. I have consider'd 
this matter with the greatest attention, 1 have consulted those few of the 
King's Servants that I could depend on, as well as the Council, & they 
are all of opinion I cannot fall on a more effectual method to embarass 
the faction, than suffering the Assembly to sit some little time longer, 



332 

& putting it in their power to compleat the necessary business of the 
Province, if they chuse it, which I do not expect, as I am convinced 
they do not wish at present to have even the appearance of a Legislature. 
They are ripe for any violence, & I am determined whatever is done 
shall be acted before them ; in fact it will be their own Deed, as the 
Assembly almost to a man are Members of the Congress, & Committee. 
No subterfuge should be left them ; things are come to such a pass My 
Lord that the whole World ought to know — that the present measures 
proceed not from a mob fired by oppression but . . . are the result 
of a concerted plan, and firm determination of a powerful party, to 
establish an independancy, by Acts as unprovoked, as they are unjusti- 
fiable." The Advices from the Continental Congress (a 

few resolutions excepted intended for the publick eye) are as carefully 
concealed as possible, but it is said that two millions of Dollars are to be 
raised immediately, & the proportion of this Province will be 56,000£ 
Ster£. This with the enormous expence of ye new Troops &c a . will 
oblige them to raise a sum little short of 300,000£ Stere." The 
Carolina Committee and Council of Safety sit night and day ; is told 
they are debating about seizing the King's officers and those few who 
have not signed the Association. " Your Lordship will easily conceive 
the distress of my present situation, & how very uncertain my personal 
safety is ; but as I know my presence here embarasses them I am 
determined at all events to remain to the last extremity, & see what they 
dare do. To publish proclamations against their proceedings would be 
only giving them an opportunity of pouring fresh insults on Groverment, 
but could I only keep my ground till General Gage enables me to 
publish an Account of a severe correction given to the Massachusets 
People ; & till the Admiral recollects the situation we must be in to the 
Southward, & sends us some little force ; I am still in hopes our Heroes 
here might come to their senses." Has received no communication 
from Lieutenant Governor Bull. Commends Mr. Wragge for his zeal 
and loyalty though he is threatened with banishment for it. Georgia 
has joined the General Association and appointed delegates to the 
Continental Congress. Gunpowder seized; the governor, Sir James 
Wright, dares not write. Hears that a posse of men is waiting to seize 
his dispatches from Mr. Innes as he carries them down to the packet, so 
will send to Capt. Thornborough for his boat in the night to convey 
Mr. Innes safely with them. Enumerates five papers sent in a packet 
with this letter. 

Letter signed. 10 folio pages. Letter written in Innes's hand. 

Endorsed:— Charles Town. 19 th & 20 th July, 1775. Lord W™ 
Campbell (N° 2) R/. 23 d Sept r 1775. (10 Inclosures). Ent d . 

Chief Justice W. Hey to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, July 20. Quebec. — The confusion in the province. Three 
attempts made by the rebels by the way of Lake Champlain. Observa- 
tions on the Canadians and their refusal to fight against the rebels. His 
own situation unpleasant but will stay until driven out by armed force, for 
though he may do little good by staying, he might do harm by leaving. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 folio pages. 

Endorsed on a wrapper: — Quebec. 20 July 1775. Chief Justice 

Hey relative to the State of Affairs in Quebec, (private) ^q. p* 2. 

m 
p.m. [and, in the King's hand~\ — . p l 7. p.m. 



333 

Soame Jenyns to [Lord Dartmouth.] 

1775, July 20. Botisham. — Has been requested to recommend 
Mr. James Gifford who has served some years in the Army as Captain 
of a Company in General Keppel's Regiment, but now sold out and 
wishes to obtain some inferior Government or Lieutenant Government. 
in America or the West Indies. Thinks he is suitable for it, as he has 
served six years in that country and seems well acquainted with most of 
the provinces. 

Autograph letter signed. 1§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — So. Jenyns Esq r 20 July 1775, recommending M r 
Gifford to a Governing 



Benjamin Harrison to General George Washington. 

1775, July 21, 23 and 24. Philadelphia.—' 4 Your fatigue and 
various kinds of trouble, I dare say are great ; but they are not more 
than I expected, knowing the people you have to deal with by the 
sample we have here. ... I wish, with all my heart, your troops 
were better, and your stores more complete. . . . The want of 
Engineers, I fear, is not to be supplied in America. Some folks here 
seemed much displeased at your report on that head. . . . Indeed, 
my friend, I do not know what to think of some of these men ; they 
seem to be exceeding hearty in the cause, but still wish to keep every 
thing amongst themselves. Our President is quite of a different cast — 
noble, disinterested, and generous, to a very great degree. The Congress 
have given you the appointment of three Brigade Majors. . . . The 
military chest, I hope, will be supplied soon. . . . What has 
occasioned the delay in this article I know not, without an imitation of 
the Congress, in its slowness, is become fashionable. . . . The 
Governour ... is stili at Yorktown, with three men-of-war. Ho, 
Montague, and Foye, went the other day by water to his farm, and 
were within three or four minutes of being all taken by Captain 
Meredith, with seventy men from Hanover. . . . Meredith says 
his intentions were to carry his Lordship to Williamsburgh, to put him 
into the Palace, and promise him protection, to convince him ami the 
world that no injury was intended him ; however, as he missed his 
stroke, I daresay he will be charged with intending to murder him. 
We think the season too far advanced to send you any more men from 
the southward. . . . Georgia has come into the Union. 
The debate about our remove was taken up yesterday, and determined 
in the negative. I proposed a Committee, but could not carry it. 
. . . I think it is high time there was an end of the Congress." 
Recommends Edmund Randolph as Washington's Secretary. 

Copy. 6^ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a letter from Benj n Harrison (one of the 
Delegates at the Congress) to G. Washington, dated 21 st July, 
1775. 



Lord Townshend to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, July 21. Rainham. — A letter received from General Gage 
announces his satisfaction at the arrival of Engineer Page. Hopes 
others on their way will give equal pleasure. Mentions artillery now at 
the Tower which would be useful to General Gage and easily trans- 



334 

ported. Lord Dunmore's decision to embark. Has received a letter 
from North Carolina of 1st June describing the temper of the people 
there and the willingness of Highlanders to take up arms for the 
Government. Gunpowder has been shipped from St. EustatiHs for 
America, and the island is full of British manufactures for the American 
merchants. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Townshend 21 July, 1775, respecting the Trans- 
portation of some Artillery. 

Willing Morris & Co< to Messrs. Heyett and Barclay. 

1775, July 21. Philadelphia. — Are restrained by Act of Parliament 
from shipping their grain to any foreign country and on the 10 th Sep- 
tember their exports are to cease by vcte of Congress. If English 
crops are short the people there may feel the want of it and ardently 
wish for a reconciliation. 

Extract. Intercepted. | folio page. 

m 

to Lord Dartmouth.] 

1775, July 21. — Letter not signed, apparently to Lord Dartmouth. 
Proposes measures for the pacification of America and its restoration to 
order and obedience. An offer of accommodation after victory will 
come with greater weight and credit from the administration. Conveys 
his scheme to his Lordship previous to making it public and if objections 
are raised to its publication, such will be attended to if sent to the 
author by letter to G. L. at Stuart's Coffee house, New Bond Street. 

4 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Plan of Accommodation. Anonymous. 

[Colonel Christie] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 22. — Reasons for taking immediate possession of New 

York :— 

1. " Because the province in General is well affected, & great 
numbers of real Friends to His Majesty in the Town of New York 
who wish to promote the Public Tranquility, but are intimidated by a 
licentious Mob, as well as from the want of Troops under proper 
Orders, to afford them protection. Therefore it would now require 
about 2000 Men to recover and take possession of the place, and this 
force assisted by a delermin'd Declaration made to the Town, that 
Hostilities, and a bombardment should ensue, in case of Insult or 
Resistance. The Landing to be effected in the North River, a little 
above the Town, where the Ground commands it, under the protection 
of a couple of Frigates, & as many Bomb Vessels, in which case there 
would be no opposition ." 

2. Because the place in question is strong from its natural situation 
(this is enlarged upon) and a frigate or small armed vessel if necessary 
could keep all tiiis rich and extensive country in good order, and the 
whole easily defended; also, the "possessing New York will be estab- 
lishing a Centrical and Winter Port for Vessels with Warlike or other 
Stores as may be found expedient to send from Englan 1." 



335 

3. Because opportunity would be given to recover the arms and stores 
of the King's which were violently seized, and the nations would be 
happy for the pretence to join and drive off the people who came from 
the neighbouring provinces of Connecticut at the instigation of certain 
turbulent and factious spirits in the province of New York. 

4. " Because It is of the last Importance in all Countrys under the 
Calamity of a Civil War, to endeavour, if practicable, to form Provincial 
Battalions, or a Force raised from among themselves," &c. 

5. Because the seeds of Disaffection & Rebellion were 1st sown in 
the town of New York the country being pretty free from it & dependpng] 
so much upon the exportation of their grain . . . "It may almost 
be presumed, that the Skochry people, a numerous race or Industrious 
& Obedient Germans settled upon a Creek or River of that name, 
branching from the Mohock River above Schenectady, would take Arms 
to a man, for the King, upon the least Encouragement, as well as those 
Inhabitants of the Mohock River, all whom are extremely Robust, & 
esteemed the best Militia (Canadians excepted) in N. America." 

6. Because of many German and Scotch wandering in New York 
waiting to settle there. 

7. Query. Whether some one should not be sent over to receive and 
report complaints from inhabitants. 

8. The possession of it is necessary to open communication with 
Boston. 

9. Shows its necessity for the sake of other provinces in their fishery 
and trade. 

Not signed, but in the same hand as the body of Colonel Christie's 
letter of 31 July. 2 J large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Col. Christie 22 July, 1775. Reasons for taking 
immediate Possession of N. York. 



Maria Eliza Ken ward to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, July 22. Saint Augustine. — Applies for assistance on behalf of 
her husband, storekeeper to the Ordnance of St. Augustine, who is ill 
through the intense heat of the climate here, and his affairs are so 
intricate that they do not allow of his leaving East Florida. Encloses 
copy of a letter written by Governor Tonyn on his behalf. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — M rs Kenward S fc Augustine 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Sir Gregory Page, Baronet. 

1775, April 23. — Reminding him of his duty as a wealthy relation 
to render assistance to Mv Kenward in this his time of need and 
tv hose character and reputation are warmly referred to. 
Copy in M rs Kenward' s hand. 2 J folio pages. 

J[ohn] A [dams] to Mrs. Abigail Adams, Braintree. 

1775, July 24. Philadelphia. — To the care of Colonel Warren, favoured 
by Mr. Hitchborne. The postscript of this letter is : — " I wish I had 
given you a complete history, from the beginning to the end of the 
journey, of the behaviour of my compatriots. No mortal tale could 
equal it. I will tell you in future, but you shall keep it a secret'— the 



336 

fidgets, the whims, the caprice, the vanity, the superstition, the irrita- 
bility of some of us is •' 

Copy. Intercepted. 1^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from J. A. [John Adams] to M rs Abigail 
Adams. Philadelphia, 24 th July, 1775. 



[John Adams] to the Honourable James Warren. 

1775, July 24. Philadelphia. — Favoured by Mr. Hitchborne. " This 
letter was anonymous but written in the same hand as that to Abigail 
Adams." 

Copy. Intercepted. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from to the Hon ble 

James Warren Esq r at Watertown. Philadelphia, 24 th July, 
1775. 

Note. — These two letters and that of Harrison of the 21st were published in 
various American newspapers. They are reprinted by Peter Force in his American 
Archives, Fourth Series, Vol. II., columns 1717 and 1697. 



Lieutenant General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 24. Boston. — No. 35. Has received from his Lordship 
extracts of his correspondence with Governor Martin respecting supplies. 
Had already sent ammunition which it appears has never reached him, 
nor has the letter which accompanied it. Transmits address to the 
King from the Council of Massachusetts, also list of the members; 
notwithstanding insult and oppression they have remained loyal to 
Government. Informs of the death of Eliakim Hutchinson, Judge of 
the Inferior Court, and of Mr. Cotton, Deputy Marshal. 

Copy. 2 J- folio pages. [The originals of this and the two following 
letters from General Gage are in the Public Record Office, series 
America and West Indies, Vol. 130, fos. 435, 455 and 467.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of Letter from Hon. Lieu* Gen 1 Gage, to the Earl 
of Dartmouth, dated Boston 24 th July 1775. 



Lieutenant General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 24. Boston. — Private. Lieutenant Colonel McLean is 
collecting a number of Highlanders from different provinces to form his 
corps. Observations on the corps of Lieutenant Colonel Gorham and 
Brigadier Ruggles. Difficulties of the King's friends owing to the 
want of cash and pr< visions, as the officer's bills are rejected and rebel 
privateers intercept I heir supplies. Proposes measures to suppress the 
rebellion. Lieutenai t Colonel James delivers this dispatch with a 
drawing of this town and position of the two armies. Transmits copies 
of letters passed between Burgoyne and Lee which have been printed to 
reveal the true state of affairs to those who are being blinded by the 
leaders of the rebellion. 

Copy. 3| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from Honble L* Gen 1 Gage to the Earl 
of Dartmouth dated Boston 24 th July 1775. Private. 



S37 

Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 24. Boston. — Separate. Congress has taken the direction 
of the war upon itself. Washington and Lee have joined the Rebels 
near Boston. All supplies withheld from the British troops and friends 
of Government here, even fishing. The King's ships brought some 
relief. State of Fort William and Mary. Arrival of troops from Ireland. 
Disadvantageous situation of the King's troops in Boston. Is glad of 
the assistance of Major Generals Howe, Clinton and Burgoyne. 
Remarks on pamphlet published by the Continental Congress called 
"The Declaration of the United Colonies." Its contents replete with 
deceit and falsehood. 

Copy. 3^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Hon ble Lieu* Gen 1 Gage to 
the Earl of Dartmouth dated Boston 24 th of July 1775. (Separate) 
R/4 th Sept r by Col. James. 

Major-General John Burgoyne to Lord Dartmouth. 

J 775, July 26. Boston. — Private affairs of consequence require his 
presence in England. Feels himself a mere military cipher in his 
present post, and pleads, upon the most zealous motives, for some more 
active part in this great service. Submits a plan* to visit in the course 
of the autumn the different colonies and obtain their sentiments relative 
to an accommodation. Since he formed the plan a circumstance has 
happened which makes him think no admittance would be granted to 
him. " M r Lee late a half pay major in the King's service, & whose 
character I am persuaded is well known to your Lordship, lived with 
me formerly upon tha footing of friendship. This gentleman your 
Lordship will have heard has accepted from the general Congress a 
commission of Major General in what is called the army of the united 
provinces, and he is now acting in that capacity under General Washing- 
ton the commander-in-chief. A few days after his arrival at the 
neighbouring Camp I received two letters from him one dated Phila- 
delphia June 7 th for the delay of which he blames the person charged 
to convey it ; the other dated July o th the day on which it came to my 
hands. 

It was my intention to transmit to your Lordship extracts of these 
letters stript of all stuff which is calculated merely for the meridien of 
New England. But finding since that the first letter was printed & 
reprinted in all the American papers, & concluding that by the same 
pains to circulate it, it will appear in the English ones, I give 
you a copy entire, together with my answer which at the request of 
M r Gage & the army has been printed likewise, tho', for my own sake I 
would rather have avoided that measure." His ultimate view was to try 
Lee in a private conference but the Provincial Congress forbade Lee 
meeting him Thus his scheme for the autumn fails. Presses his 
entreaties to return to England 

Autograph letter signed. 8 quarto pages. 

Endorsed on wrapper .-—Gen 1 Burgoyne. 

Enclosures : — 

1 " 75, Jane 7. Philadelphia. — Printed pamphlet entitled " A 
Letter from General Lee, to General Burgoyne, printed from 



* This plan is fully given in his letter to Lord North of 14 June— see the 
Marquis of Abergavenny's MSS. (52), Tenth Report, Appendix Part VI 

y 82140. Y 



338 

Enclosures — eont. 

the New York Gazetteer of July 6 to which is added, General 
Burgoyne' s Answer, and A Copy of a Letter from General Lee, 
declining an Interview proposed by General Burgoyne. Boston ; 
Printed and Sold at Draper' s Printing -Office, in Newbury Street 
mdcclxxv." 

18 octavo pages. 

1775, July 5. Cambridge. — Extract of a letter from General Lee 
to General Burgoyne. not printed. Regrets that Carleton is 
persuading the Indians to fight against the Colonies. States 
what he considers will be the consequences of such an action, 
especially in the event of commercial advantages being offered to 
trance and Spain, who would accept them. Auvisea him to 
take measures according to this information. 
1^ quarto pages. 

Copy of the above letter with the second enclosure. 

Endorsed: — Genl Burgoyne Boston, 26 July 1776 (sic) containing 
Hints relative to Lee's Information & Conduct, and desiring leave to 
I'eturn for the Winter. 

G. Colman to General Lee. 

1775, July 26. London. — Has duly honoured Lee's bills, but as the 
bonds are still in his (Lee's) hands will be ghid of a line acknowledging 
that they are fully discharged. Cornmends Garton as an agent. 
Laments the daily news from America and hopes he will not take an 
active part in the rebellion. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — London, July 26, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
G. Colman, to General Lee. 



Jonathan Garton to General Charles Lee. 

1775, July 27. London. — Hopes soon to be able to sell the annuity. 
M r Atkinson has promised to grant the money if General Lee will draw 
upon him [Garton] for £o,000. Promises to honour all other bills drawn 
upon him. 

Copy of another letter to General Lee follows, from John Evans, dated 
Great Russel Street 2 August, to the effect that he has accepted two 
bills of exchange drawn by General Lee on M r Garton in favour of 
Willing Morris and Company for £200 and £300 which when due are 
payable at Mess rs Drummonds. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — London, July 27, 1 775. Copy of a Letter from J. Garton 
— & London August 2, 1775. Copy of a Letter from J, Evans to 
General Charles Lee. 



Georgia. 

1775, July 27. Savannah. — Printed extract from the Minutes of the 
Council of Safetv Georgia. Eight resolutions as to regulations of 



339 

troops. Marked at the foot in Governor Sir James Wright's hand :— 
Received this Paper Monday the 21st of August. 
1 folio page. 

Endorsed: — Resolutions of Com. of Safety of Georgia, 1775. 
27 July. 

James Tilghman to the Right Honourable Lady Juliana Penn, 

Spring Garden, London. 

1775, July 27. Philadelphia. — Congress is making expensive pre- 
parations for offensive and defensive operations. A large army is near 
Boston very eager for action and possessing many advantages over the 
King's forces. Condition of General Gage's army. Hopes the petition 
to the King will produce a parliamentary commission to some persons 
of weight to come over and treat with the Americans from personal 
knowledge of affairs. Stagnation of trade; hopes for improvement when 
they receive powers to grant lands. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 £ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Phil a July 27, 1775. Copy of a Letter from M r Ja s 
Tilghman to Lady Juliana Penn. 



American Intelligence. 

1775, July 28. — Paper in the hand of John Robinson, Secretary of the 
Treasury, headed " Minutes," and containing intelligence of American 
affairs obtained from Captain Breen or Been of the " Mary Ann " of 
New York. Gives names and particulars of vessels in Cape Nicola 
Mole, Hispaniola, in April last that were loading with military stores 
bound for America. Proceedings taken by Captain Been in conse- 
quence of this discovery. Captain Been informs of preparations 
being made on the lakes, and Provincials getting ready for the attack of 
Boston in the winter over the ice. Just before he left New York on 
2 June a sloop arrived there with ammunition from Holland. Details 
of chase after her and her escape. Captain Been's quarrel with Sliiers 
who seized the keys of the Custom House from the Collector,, Force 
needed at New York to support friends to Government. Captain 
Henderson and Captain Young are buying up arms under false 
pretences. Captain Been is well known to Governor Tryon. Details 
of the rebellious proceedings of Lieutenant D. Campbell, Lieutenant 
Fleming, and Whittaker. 

4 \ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Minutes — 27 th July 1775. America — 



Letter to Ingham Foster [from his brother]. 

1775, July 29 and August 5. Philadelphia. — Transactions of Con- 
gress; Franklin and two others are appointed to conciliate the Indians 
by large presents, etc. Five thousand men are on their march for 
Ticonderoga to be under the command of General Schuyler, who will 
act according to the motions of the administration and the exigency of 
affairs here. General Gage is fortifying himself at Boston where the 
Americans have drawn a line of circumvallation round him, of near 
fourteen miles in extent. The whole continent is determined to fi<>ht 
for their liberties. Service allotted to the militia. Congress adjourned 

Y 2 



340 

till 5th September next. Reasons for Congress addressing the people 
of Ireland. Details of a conversation between Generals Gage and 
Howe on the present critical state of affairs. Franklin has accepted 
the post of Postmaster General. (August 5.) Vessel delayed, so gives 
present situation of armies as gathered from letters received last night 
from Mifflin, Read and others dated at Cambridge Camp. Reported 
resignation of General Gage by a deserter, who states that it was given 
out he had handed over his military command to Genl. Howe and acted 
only as civil governor. 

Copy. Intercepted. 7 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Philad a July 29, 1775. Copy of a Letter not signed to 
Ingham Foster. 

Lord Townshend to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, July 29. Rainham. — Regrets to hear Skene is in danger for 
want of stores. Congratulates him on the success of His Majesty's 
troops on the 17 th June. Fears General Gage has much to do to 
establish himself in such healthy and commanding winter quarters as 
may maintain his forces in a respectable footing. " Your Lordship is 
the best Judge how practicable it may be to possess " Long Island, New 
York and some part of the province of Connecticut by embarkations 
from hence if such can be spared. Great reinforcements are probably 
moving to General Putnam. Stress of the war will lie on the Light 
Infantry; this kind of regiment raised more easily than any other. 
Captain Montressor in a letter to Lord Townshend complains of want 
of engineers. Reason for desiring to see Captain Holland's map was 
only u to gratify my curiosity as to this cursed Height above Charles 
Town, which I was anxious about from y e moment I heard the Rebells 
seized much artillery." 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

In wrapper endorsed: — Lord Townshend, 29 th July, 1775. On the 
subject of Artillery for America. 

H. Byrd to Sir Jeffery Amherst. 

1775, July 30. Westover. — Impossible now to avoid a civil war. 
Has met with insults and given offence because of his refusal to com- 
mand the army being raised by their Convention to oppose the King's 
troops. The Southern Colonists have been led to believe by false 
accounts that they are far superior to the power of Great Britain and 
by artful schemes have been deluded into rebellion. Requests he may 
not be considered one of the American traitors as he is ready to serve 
His Majesty and would be glad of an opportunity to convince the 
Virginians of their error and bring them back to loyalty and duty. 
Asks that an answer to this letter may be enclosed to General Gage and 
thence forwarded to him by water, if no ships are sent to this colony. 

Autograph letter signed. 2^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed on wrapper ; — M r Byrd to S r Jeff. Amherst. 

Governor Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 30. Charles Town. — No. 4. Arrival of packet. " In 
consequence of the directions I had before given to Capt. Thornborough 
he secured the Mail on board the King's Ship, & that night at 12°Clock, 



341 

I went on board with the Dep? Post M. Gen 1 , open'd my own dispatches, 
& have taken the best care I could of those belonging to the neigh- 
bouring Governors." Preparations to fortify the town. Encloses a 
" waspish " message addressed to him by the Assembly on his refusal to 
adjourn them. The Association has been refused by many through the 
influence of Colonel Fletchal. The rebels most indefatigable in their 
efforts ; the late defection of Georgia " brought about entirely by the 
People here " was a matter of amazing triumph to them. Remarks 
thereon and desirability of recovering that unlucky stroke. 

In Secretary Innes's hand, signed by Lord William Campbell. 
3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Charles Town, 30 July 1775. L d W m Campbell. (N° 
4.) R/ 23 d Sept. 1775. (I Inclosure). Ent* 

Enclosure : — 

1775, July 24. — Copy of a message from the South Carolina 
Assembly to Lord William Campbell expressing their objection 
to be styled the Lower House of Assembly — they prefer to be 
termed the General, or the Commons House of Assembly. 
With the Governor s reply. That he is too distressed just now 
to enter into disputes about mere words and that he therefore 
returns their message with the words they think exceptionable 
omitted. 

In Secretary lines s hand, marked copy. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — -for Lett r N°. 4. Message from Assembly. 
Governor's Reply. In L d > W m Campbells 30 Jidy (N° 4). 

James Tilgiiman to William Baker. 

1775, July 30. Philadelphia. — Advisability of settling a temporary 
line of jurisdiction to the westward owing to the arbitrary and violent 
proceedings of Lord Dunmore's officers. Has heard that Doctor Couelly 
(Lord Dunmore's chief instrument) is going to England with some Indian 
Chiefs of the Delaware tribe who seek for a confirmation of their lands. 
All things seem verging towards anarchy. Congress proceedings. 
Ammunition is being sent in by the French, Spaniards and Dutch. 
Hopes the petition from Congress to the King may have a salutary effect 
as he believes they only object to internal taxation. Interference with 
private as well as public correspondence. 

Copy. Intercepted. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Phil a July 30, 1775. Copy of a Letter from M r Ja 9 
Tilghman to W m Baker Esq r . 



Lord Viscount Barrington to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 31. War Office. — Directions concerning the five regi- 
ments mentioned in the margin of his letter, to embark from Ireland 
for North America. 

Copy. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from Lord Vise* Barrington to the 
Earl of Dartmouth dated 31 July 1775. R/ same Day. 



342 

Colonel G. Christie to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 31. Leicester Square. — Believes he could be of great 
service to some General in America on account of his personal know- 
ledge of that country from long service there. Asks to be appointed 
Quarter Master General to the Forces in North America. Enumerates 
his reasons for soliciting this favour. 

Letter signed. \\ folio pages. 

Endrsed : — Col. Christie 31 July 1775, containing his Thoughts on 
carrying on the War in America. 



[Colonel G. Christie] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 31. — Memorandum. "To the Papers given the 18th & 
22nd Ins* a few additional Remarks are humbly Suggested. Viz. : — 
1st. To Garrison Boston in the Winter will require no less than 6000 
Men." It will probably undergo a blockade if not taken by assault. 
Proposes measures to be adopted with regard to removing the fleet 
from Boston and making a descent on New York. Ticonderoga should 
be recovered and preparations made for Canadian service next sprang. 

Not signed, but is in the same hand as the body of the foregoing 
letter. 2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Memorandum 31 July 1775. 

Congress. 

1775. July 28 and 31 etc. — Paper containing extracts from the address 
of Congress to the people of Ireland, 28 July ; from their Resolutions, 
31 July, after the debate on the Resolution of the House of Commons 
the 20th February ; and from their Declaration of the cause of taking 
up arms \_6 July]. 

3 pages. 



Henry Kelly to Messrs. Kelly and Company. 

1775, July 31. Chester Town. — " In America the order of Things 
seems to be inverted." Owing to present disturbances he would be 
happy to collect all that is due at the loss of 10 per cent. The measures 
of Government are exceedingly unfortunate and the error of their 
military proceedings patent to all. Thinks the troops will vacate 
Boston in the fall. Cannot think that General Gage has acted with the 
spirit becoming a commanding officer. 

Extract. 1 ^ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Chester Town July 31, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Hy Kelly to Mess" Kelly & C°. 



Edward Stratford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, July 31. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 
Autograph letter signed, 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — Ed. Stratford Esq r 31 July, 1775, offering to raise a 
Reg* in the Service of Gov* for America, upon certain Conditions. 



343 

Willing Morris & Co. to Messrs. John Mottedx & Co. 

1775, July 31. Postscript August 3. Philadelphia. — "You'll have 
seen by our late Letters we could not execute the fresh Orders of any 
Your Foreign Correspondents." The restraining Act now prohibits 
them from sending produce to any foreign markets. M Our Exchange 
is at 150 p. c. so that if Wheat came down to their Limits of 5/ to 5/6 
Nothing could be done." Both wheat and flour hav^ fallen since the 
20th. People preparing to sow another crop notwithstanding the 
dull prospect before them ; they are cheerfully disposed to submit to 
their fate and are united in a determination to sacrifice all things to 
preserve the liberties of their country. " You will hear a great deal of 
what you call bad news from this country, but here it is thought 
differently of, an I we hope will be the means of bringing about a 
reconciliation on honest and equitable principles." 

Extract. Intercepted, 1 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia July 31, 1775. Extract of a Letter from 
Willing Morris & Co. to John Motteux Esq* & Co. 



Henry Cruger to John Cruger, New York. 

1 775, August 2. London. — " Dear Uncle, I hope this may find you in 
tollerable Health & Spirits, amidst the innumerable Troubles & Afflic- 
tions that beset you." Thinks the only way to make peace would be 
moderation, treaty, and a little concession on the part of the colonies. 
The King is said to be enraged at the defiance of the Congress. All is 
quiet here and likely to continue so in spite of the efforts of the 
merchants who will be ruined by the dispute. Private messages to 
friends. 

Copy. Intercept td. If folio pages. 



Henry Cruger to John Harris Cruger. 

1775, August 2. London. — Depression of his spirits. Apologies for 
neglect of correspondence with lady friends. " I would not, could 
not do a dishonourable thing, no not to possess the World's great mass 
of Vanity. I repeat I have twice as much in America as I am worth. 
Who then in such precarious circumstances would think of Matrimony ?" 
This country enjoys the most perfect repose and were it not for the 
newspapers the people would hardly know there was a civil war in 
America The administration are making tremendous proposals for 
next summer's campaign, which doubtless will be carried out unless 
America makes some concession. 

Copy. Intercepted. If folio pages. 



John Harris Cruger to Moses Franks. 

1775, August 2, preceded by a previous letter of 28 July. New 
York. — Has just received an imperfect account of the confusion and 
uproar in England in consequence of the battle of Lexington and 
Concord. Refers him to newspapers and the bearer of this, William 
Laight, for intelligence, as he can tell more than it is safe for friends 
to write. Both armies are now strongly entrenched and fortified and an 



344 

attack from either side will be attended with sad consequences. The 
enthusiasm of the Americans increases. 
Extract. Intercepted. 1 \ folio pages. 

Lord Dartmouth to Lieutenant General Thomas Gage. 

1775, August 2. Whitehall. — No. 22. Captain Chads arrived with 
his dispatch of 25 June giving an account of the action on the 1 7th. 
Remarks on the importance of this battle and communicates the King's 
grateful thanks to officers and men for their brave conduct under such 
disadvantageous circumstances, especially to Generals Howe and Clinton 
and to Colonel Pigot. Regrets their heavy losses. Requests him to 
make arrangements to return to England leaving General Howe in 
command. Mentions six enclosures. 

Copy. 4^ folio pages . 

Endorsed :— Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to the 
Hon ble Lieu* General Gage. Dated Whitehall, 2 Aug* 1775. 
(N° 22). 

Enclosures : — 

Lord Dartmouth to Governor Sir Guy Cakleton. 

1775, August 2. Whitehall. — N° 23. Althotigh Ticonderoga 
has been lost, trusts the measures decided on will have a good 
effect and inspire confidence. His Majesty hopes to have an 
army of 20,000 men in North America next spring. Leave 
granted to General Gage to return to England ; command of 
the Army in the Colonies on the Atlantic in his absence to 
devolve upon Howe ; but if in the course of the service the two 
armies should be joined the command of the to hole would be 
with Carleton as the senior officer. Money about to be sent 
out, with additional supply of arms S>'C. and presents for the 
Indians. 

Copy. 3 folio pages. [Draft of this letter is in the Public 
Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, Vol. 11, /b. 61.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to 
Gov r Carleton dated Whitehall 2 d Aug* 1775. By the 
Lizard Cap 1 Hamilton. 

Lord Dartmouth to Major General Howe. 

1775, August 2. Whitehall. — Sending com?nission to act as 
Commander in Chief of the Colonies on the Atlantic Ocean, 
during General Gage's absence hi England, the like commission 
being sent to General Carleton to command the forces in 
Canada. 

Copy. 2 folio pages. [The duplicate signed letter is in the 
Royal Institution, American Manuscripts, Vol 2, No. 1.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth 
to Major Gen 1 Howe, dated 2 d August 1775. 

177", August 2. St. James's. — Copy of the Commissions from 
the King to Major General Howe and Sir Guy Carleton. 
5| Jolio pages. 



845 

Lord Dartmouth to Lieutenant- General Thomas Gage. 

17 75, August 2. Whitehall. — No. 23. In consequence of a letter 
from the Secretary at War, requests him to give orders for the dis- 
embarkation and disposal of the troops mentioned in that letter. 

Copy. \ folio page. 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to the 
Hon ble Lieu* Gen 1 Gage dated 2 d of August 1775. (N° 23.) 



Lord Dartmouth to Lieutenant-General Thomas Gage. 

1775, August 2. Whitehall. — Acquainting him of the augmentation 
of various regiments and the embarkation of others for America. 
" The steps which you say the rebels have taken for calling in the 
assistance of the Indians leave no room to hesitate upon the propriety 
of your pursuing the same measure." Encloses a letter to Colonel 
Johnson on the subject. Discusses various questions and propositions 
with regard to the method of pursuing the war. 

Copy. 6 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Separate Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth 
to the Hon ble Lieu* General Gage. Dated Whitehall 2 d August 
1775. (Separate.) 

Enclosure : — 

Lord Dartmouth to Colonel Guy Johnson. 

1775, July 24. Whitehall. — As intelligence has been received 
that the rebels have excited the Indians to assist them, there is 
all the more urgent need to take such steps as may induce them 
to engage in His Majesty' 's service under such plan as shall be 
suggested to Colonel Johnson by General Gage to whom this 
letter is sent accompanied with a large assortment of presents 
for this object. As the matter is of great importance he requests 
him to use the utmost diligence and activity therein, but must 
leave details to his judgment. 

Copy. If folio pages. [Draft of this letter is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 279, 

fo. 247.] 

Endorsed: — Copy of a Letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to 
Colonel Guy Johnson dated Whitehall 24th July 1775. 



Lord Dartmouth to Governor Francis Legge. 

1775, August 2. Whitehall. — No. 18. The King approves of his 
conduct in requiring all persons coming from the New England 
colonies to take the oaths of allegiance to the King before being 
allowed to carry on the fishery. Desires him to do the same with regard 
to distressed persons seeking grants of land gratuitously at his hand. 

Duplicate letter signed. 1 5 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Earl of Dartmouth's Letter 2 d August 1775. No. 18. 
(Duplicate.) 



346 

Lord Dunmore to Lord Dartmouth. 

1 775, August 2. " Otter " Sloop of War in Elizabeth River, Virginia. 
— Arrival of troops from St. Augustine, also dispatches from Governor 
Touyn for his Lordship, which are very important. 

Extract. 1 \ folio pages. [The duplicate signed letter r» in tue Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 213, fo. 459.] 



J. Ingersoll to Jonathan Ingersoll, New Haven. 

1775, August 2. London. — Is now suffering under the most 
humiliating news of a defeat of the Provincials by the King's troops. 
Supposes defeat is owing to the King's troops beiug better officered and 
more amply furnished with every implement of destruction used in war. 
Is eager to hear of some success over General Gage's army that may 
retrieve the late disgrace. Mentions what is reported to be the King's 
intentions for the future. Remarks on the commercial relations between 
England and America. Assures him America has no auxiliaries to 
depend upon. Has heard with delight of the bravery of the Americans 
in the late action. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — London, Aug* 2, 1775. Copy of a Letter from J. Ingersoll 
to Jon n Ingersoll Esq r . 

William Strahan to Benjamin Franklin. 

1775, August 2. London. — Has heard with regret of the late battle 
at Boston as it widens the breach and renders all hope of reconciliation 
more difficult and distant. A civil war has commenced in earnest. 
Wishes some means could be found to stop it and settle differences 
without shedding more blood. Requests him to do his utmost towards 
this end. Great preparations being made here to furnish more troops 
and ships to America, and he thinks that country will have a hard time 
in seeking to overcome the same ; victory on either side will be dearly 
bought. Hopes the address which Congress proposes to lay before the 
King will be worded in proper terms and that in next October he will 
come over with equitable proposals and be the means of restoring peace 
and unanimity to British subjects everywhere. 

Copy. Intercepted. 3| folio pages. 



Joseph Swift to Messrs. John and Robert Barclay. 

1775, August 2. Philadelphia. — Hopes that the claim which 
America makes, when rightly understood by the people of England, will 
bethought reasonable upon constitutional principles and the Parliament's 
right to tax America be given up. Is convinced that Great Britain will 
be the loser by the contest. Sends an order for goods to be sent if 
differences are settled. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Robert Watts to The Honourable John Watts. 

1775, August 2. New York. — Addressed to the care of Mr. Moses 
Pranks. Has been impatiently expecting to hear of his arrival, but the 
June packet has not yet been seen. No fresh occurrence to report in 



347 

the situation or politics of the town. The contractors must themselves 
do all that is necessary to supply provisions and money to the east- 
ward. 

Extract. Intercepted. J folio page. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 3. Secretary's Office. — " Our Shop to-day has received 
only the usual Communication from the Post Office & a private Letter 
to you from Charles Town of the 10 of June." Has written to Lords 
Townshend and Barrington in consequence of his Lordship's commands 
of yesterday. Major Maxwell is mortified and disappointed, offering to 
give up his majority. Is going to dine with the Virginia merchants. 
Fears for IngersolPs fate if the original of his letter was at hand. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Pownall 3 Aug. — 75. 



Willing Morris and Co. to Messrs. Errecarte del Rio 

and Co. 

1775, August 3. Philadelphia. — " The « Myrtilla,' Captain Caton, is 
now loading pretty briskly " with flour for Corunna, to be landed and 
reshipped at Falmouth, and will be dispatched as soon as possible. All 
exports have been stopped in Virginia except tobacco, but Maryland, 
Pennsylvania and New York will remain open until the 10th September. 
The ship will be recommended to George Casker Fox at Falmouth to 
assist the Captain there and all necessary instructions can be sent to 
him. 

Extract. Intercepted, f folio page. 



Post Office Interceptions. 

Wrapper endorsed as follows : — "August 3 d 1775. From M r Todd 
(private & most secret). \ p* 11. a.m. [and, in the King's hand] 
20 m p* 2 p.m." The following copies of intercepted letters were within 
this wrapper. G. Colin an to General Lee 26 July ; Jonathan Garton 
to General Lee 27 July and John Evans to General Lee 2 August; 
Henry Cruger to John Cruger ; Henry Cruger to John H. Cruger ; 
William Strahau to Doctor Franklin ; J. Ingersoll to Jonathan Ingersoll 
all of 2 August 1775. 



John Gray to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 4. 7, Orange Street, Leicester Fields. — Offers his Lord- 
ship a pamphlet ; has marked in the margin the parts that tend to make 
his reasoning more full and conclusive. " I have endeavoured to over- 
turn the doctrine about Free Gifts; & from the authentic documents of 
history, hitherto grossly overlooked by our historians, to establish the 
maxim that Public Supplies are necessary duties. I flatter myself I 
have put the case of Wales, of Chester, & of the Netherlands, so often 
absurdly appealed to, in quite a new light; and also the case of Ireland, 
which has hitherto been the great stumbling block in the argument with 
the Colonies." ..." It has ever been my system to make the 

Colonies feel la puissance foudroyant of Parliament by Political acts, 



348 

which would have brought them upon their knees without a single 
soldier ; & I still think that ^Government can act most powerfully by 
that Engine. The Colonies are vainly presumptuous of their own 
resources, therefore it will be in the highest degree mortifying & humiliat- 
ing to them to feel " that such can vanish at the command of England. 
Suggests that premiums be given in every county to the farmers who 
should sow the greatest quantity of wheat. Denies the assertion that 
the colonists can better afford to lose 20 men than we can, & thinks 
it would have a good effect if a gratification were given to every survivor 
of the regiment that first entered the entrenchments at Bunker's Hill. 
Remarks on the Declaratory Act and further refers his Lordship to his 
pamphlet. (This pamphlet is not now with the letter.) 

Autograph letter signed. 7\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — J. Gray. Aug. 4, 1775, respecting the Settlement of our 
Disputes with the Colonies. 



J. Ingersall [Ingersoll] to Jared Ingersall. 

1775, August 5. Philadelphia. — The miniature picture is still on 
board ship, and the trunk which contains it must undergo the examina- 
tion of the Committee of Inspection before he can have it. Times have 
become so critical that both of them must be careful what they write. 

Copy. Intercepted. § folio page. 



William Knox to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 5. Whitehall. — " My dear Lord, Some accounts have 
been received of your Lordships Friends in Watling Street which shew 
them to be persons deserving attention We are promised particulars 
Tomorrow and when they are received they will be forwarded to your 
Lordship by a Messenger. There appears to be an intercourse of a 
nature which ought to be prevented, but I see no way of doing it without 
a Proclamation declaring the Rebellion." The Article from Philadelphia 
in the newspaper herewith transmitted has been received by Mr. Blackburn 
and other American merchants from private correspondents and so 
considered authentic. He agrees with the 1st proposition thereof 
respecting trade with America. The only letters for Lord Dartmouth 
from America are from Governor Wentworth at Fort William. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 
Endorsed : — M r Knox. 5 Aug. — 75. 



The Reverend Robert Boucher Nickolls to [Lord 

Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 5. London. — Relates his distresses and losses in 
America during the rebellion, on account of his loyalty. Would be 
glad of some appointment in Ireland. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — The Rev d M r Nickolls 5 Aug. 1775 soliciting some 
Provision in the Church. 



349 

Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 5. Caroline Park. — Laments the loss ofAbercrombie as 
he was a gallant good officer and a zealous steady friend. Denounces the 
conduct of the rebels and justifies that of Britain towards them. Future 
prospects very gloomy but justice authorises and necessity requires 
present measures. Suggests that if officers were not distinguished by 
their dress, some of their lives might be spared. Is glad to hear the 
Canadians are in motion, hopes they will be engaged as regulars in the 
King's service. Considers Lord Dunmore can ill be spared from his 
province just now. Would much like a visit from him [Lord Dart- 
mouth]. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed{with another) : — S r Ad. Oughton Aug. 5 & 24, 1775. 



John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 5. Whitehall. — Considers IngersolFs letter and that of 
Lee's correspondent deserve attention ; thinks the original of the former 
should be detained and the latter narrowly watched. " The Lodgers at 
the Hotel in Watling Street have been watched & pumped by a 
discreet & proper person employed by Lord Rochford, they prove to 
be as stated in the Letter you left with me, (French officers from the 
West Indies, by the way of North America ; they do not conceal that 
they have been in Putnam's Camp, but they speak of him and his 
troops in a most despicable Light, and say that but for their advice 
they would have made an Attempt that would have ruined them. If 
this be true I don't think we are much obliged to the Gentlemen. 
They further say that there is at least 200 able Officers & Engineers 
of all countrys now here endeavouring to get passages to North 
America. A few days ago the Society at the Hotel was increased by 
the addition of a french officer from France, who got out of his Chaise 
at Westminster Bridge took a Hackney Coach, and went both to the 
Spanish and ffrench Embassadours — in a few days we shall probably 
know more and be able to judge what is fit to be done." M r Pownall 
thinks a Proclamation for suppressing the Rebellion ought to be issued 
soon. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Pownall 5 Aug — 75. 



William Pierie, 1st Lieutenant Royal Regiment of Artillery, to 

Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 5. No. 4, Little Titchfield Street, Cavendish Square, 
London. — Considers from long experience and acquaintance with 
America he could be of good service there. His plans, drawings and 
mode of operations of and for that country have been seen and approved 
of by Colonel Phillips, his talents are known to Lord Townshend and 
General Harvey and he is no stranger to Generals Gage and Howe. 
Has written a similar letter to Lord North. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Lieut fc Pierie 5 Aug. 1775, desiring to serve as an 
Engineer in America. 



350 

George Bryan to Hugh Williamson, M.D. 

1775, August. 6. Philadelphia. — M r Cox is returned from the 
Temple having left London on the 8 th June but brought no intelligence 
from there. General Gage and his brother officers muster about 
7000 men. Most of the wounded at Bunker's Hill have since died 
from sickness owing to want of suitable provisions. No attempt being 
made to break through their blockaders round Boston. Preparations 
made by their foes to prevent the Regulars taking any neighbouring 
island. Proceedings of both parties in Canada. A sloop of war the 
" Nautilus " is at Newcastle but the Captain needs help before he dare 
provoke hostilities. A good supply of gunpowder has arrived, and 
more is expected. Reported differences between General Gage, the 
Admiral and other officers. 

Copy. Intercepted. 2 J folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Philadelphia, Aug* Q, 1775. Copy of a Letter from 
George Bryan to D r Hugh Williamson. 



Stephen Ceronio to Messrs. Marsh Reeve and Co. 

1775, August 6. Philadelphia. — The restraining Act of Parliament 
took place on the 20 th of last July and now they can only ship to 
England, Ireland and the West Indies until the 10 th September next, 
when Congress will totally stop such exportation. Wishes for a solid 
and undisturbed peace. An excellent harvest gathered in, but regrets 
Britain cannot share it. 

Copy. Intercepted, f folio page. 



J. G. to Thomas Charles Williams. 

1775, August 6. New York. — Addressed to the care of Mess" 
Williams Teb and Williams, London. The spirit of liberty is spreading, 
even the Germans have caught it. Philadelphia is perfecting in the 
military art and life and property are freely sacrificed. The only hope 
of reconciliation is from the strong disposition on Britain's part to heal 
the differences. No account from England since 1 June. Abraham 
Van Vleek has imprudently been concerned in shipping provisions to 
Nantucket contrary to the recommendation of Congress ; he has pub- 
lished a most humiliating handbill and offered to give sloop and cargo 
to the poor to pass himself unmolested. Implores him to write nothing 
he would not like all the world to read. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1^ folio pages. 



Is. Foster to Major Robert Rogers. 

1775, August 8. Clifford's Inn. — Communication between Carver 
and M r Whitworth, the former expects to be appointed Superintendent 
of Indian affairs through the interest of the latter. Advises him to be 
careful in his letters to Whitwovth, Carver and Dacosta for some 
things look suspicious in their affairs. Has tried to obtain from 
Atherton Captain Abbot's address but without success. " Whenever 
Atherton mentions your name it is with the greatest Disrespect & 
contempt." Carver and Dacosta have finished a new plan of Boston at 
the request of Whitworth. If any doubt exists of going upon the 



351 

intended expedition, begs to be recommended to M r Mitchell, Secretary 
of the East India Company, for an employment in that service. 
Copy. Intercepted. If folio pages. 

In wrapper marked " Secret from M r T d [Todd]." 

William Molleson to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, August 10. America Square. — "This day, for the first time, 
I received a Letter from a Member of the Congress," : — This letter is 
written cautiously but gives assurances that something will be offered 
by Congress to bring about peace and harmony between the two 
countries and in the meantime prevent the further effusion of blood, Is 
unacquainted with the nature of these proposals but hopes they will be 
such as Britain can accept. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — W m Molleson Esq r 10 Aug. — 75. 

John Moore to Messrs. Davis Strachan and Co. 

1775, August 10. New York — "I must be so candid, Gentlemen, 
as to tell you that this Bill of £400 inclosed is nearly my All." The 
miserable situation of the country compels him to commit to their hands 
as a place of safety this little pittance for further exigencies, as it is the 
means of support for a family which may soon be helpless. 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio page, 

Christopher Starbuck and Co. to George Hayley. 

1775, August 10. Nantucket. — Recommends William Vassal as a 
man of honour and integrity and well acquainted with all public affairs 
in this country as well as the distressed state of this island. 

Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

R. Gordon to [ ]. 

1775, August 12. Corke. — From intercourse with people from America 
and letters received from others, gives what he considers the exact state 
of affairs in that country, particularly at Boston on the 14 th July, adding 
details of Bunker's Hill and the movements of both armies since that 
action, also why the troops are in need of provisions. 

Cop//. 4J folio pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Gordon, Corke, 12 Aug 8t 1775. Intelligence from 
America. 

Captain E. Le Cras to Mr. Le Cras, Merchant, London. 

1775, August 13. Boston. — Is in a great hurry having received 
orders to go to Halifax to stop his leaks. Laments the deplorable state 
of affairs. Fears the rebels are beforehand with them in military 
preparations. Sickness and famine reducing their army ; he personally 
is better off, and will take care to lay in a stock at Halifax in case of 
emergency. The rebels have many privateers at sea and have taken a 
Government schooner the " Diligent." Considers it will be hard work 



352 

to conquer them by military force, suggests it could be easier done by 
leaving them to themselves and cutting off their trade from every place. 
Extract. Intercepted. 2\ folio pages. 

A. Pepperrell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 13. Boston. — Doubts not he has received dispatches 
acquainting of the unhappy situation of General Gage and his army 
shut up in Boston, and surrounded by 20,000 rebels who are devastating 
with fire and sword the lives and property of all who oppose their 
measures. Sir William's property and his own have both been seized 
by them and devoted to their own use. It is believed that the town 
cannot be held much longer without more troops, as the army is 
much reduced by sickness. His personal discomfort from want of 
suitable food in the long and fatiguing passage of ten weeks without 
vegetables. 

Autograph letter signed. 5 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A. Pepperell Esq r 13 Aug 8t 1775. 

Walter Barrell to Joseph Green. 

]775, August 14. Boston. — Addressed to the care of Messrs. 
Champion, Dickason and Company, Merchants in London. Has been 
in a very disagreeable state ot frequent alarms in the night since his 
last. Relates some of the foolish proceedings of the rebels, especially in 
regard to setting fire to the Light-house. Has taken measures to 
preserve Green's house from destruction. Refers to two letters from 
John Adams to J. Warren and Mrs. Adams showing the desire of the 
Americans to be independent. Considering the uncertainty of war and 
the enthusiasm of the rebels, he questions whether Great Britain will 
overcome them either now or at all. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2\ folio pages. 

Maryland. 

1775, July 26 to August 14. — Proceedings "At a meeting of the 
Delegates appointed by the several counties of the province of Mary- 
land, at the city of Annapolis, on Wednesday the 26th of July 1775, 
and continued till the 14th day of August, in the same year. 

Printed. 3 \ large pages. 

Endorsed : — Maryland Association 1775. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 15. Whitehall — Has not yet heard anything more of 
Mr. Penn or of the petition he is said to bring. Is anxious to see this 
petition as he is much worried about the proclamation which he wished 
posponed till his Lordship's return to town, but Lord North desired to 
see the draft thereof to send to the Attorney and Solicitor General for 
revision, so sent it to Mr. Robinson who to-day returns it with the 
enclosed note. Intends giving the note and proclamation to Lord 
Suffolk to-morrow and proposing that publication thereof should be 
deferred until Mr. Penn's petition has been seen. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Pownall 15 Aug. —75. 



353 

Enclosure : — - 

The Attorney General [Edward Thurlow] to John Kobinson. 

[1775, August 13]. Sunday morning. — Agrees with the measure 
proposed in the proclamation and sees no objection to its 
publication. 

Copy. 1 quarto page. 

Timothy Newmarch to Governor Trapaud. 

1775, August 17. St. John's near Montreal. — They are now 
employed in fortifying this place, it is the Key of Canada, the enemy 
sometimes comes near them, but he does not think they will have 
sufficient courage to attack them. They (he and others) are building 
two schooners and a row galley, and when these are completed there 
Avill be an expedition up the Lake. 

Extract. Intercepted, \ folio page. 

E, Eoss to Eobert Woodgate, Golden Square. 

1775, August 17. Camp on the Heights of Charles Town.— Hopes 
the vacancies which have happened both in America and at home will 
entitle him to full pay as a Captain. Thinks England will never settle 
the war by pursuing the present measures, but by withdrawing her 
troops and stopping trade they (the Americans) might be reduced to 
reason and be glad to accept any terms offered them. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 \ folio pages. 

T. Walker to Lieutenant Beazley, Dover. 

1775, August 17. " Somerset " at Boston. — The English army is so 
reduced by sickness that it is unable to force and penetrate into the 
country where the enemy is well fortified in great numbers. Is glad of 
the opportunity of going to Halifax as much suffering is experienced at 
Boston from starvation and neglect. States the consequences he fears 
will result from present measures, and remarks on the disposition of the 
Americans. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2^ folio pages. 

Governor Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 19, Charles Town. — No. 5. " We are now in such a 
situation I cannot attempt to send duplicates of my last letters, as I 
must be under the necessity of letting this Mail take its chance in a 
defenceless Packet Boat, for I cannot in our present State send the poor 
solitary, worm eaten Sloop we have got here, out of the Harbour, as I 
may now expect the next packet every day, & I am still in hopes of 
hearing from Gen 1 Gage, and the Admiral soon. Your Lordship will 
I am afraid imagine T dwell too much, & too warmly on the wretched 
state we are left in here, but my zeal for the King's Service my thorough 
conviction of the ill consequences that has attended the total neglect of 
this Province, as well as Georgia, & N. Carolina, will not suffer me to 
remain silent. Since my arrival here, I have seen Georgia a Province 

v 82140. z 



354 

at present, of the last consequence to the W. India Islands, warp'd from 
its duty by a very insignificant internal faction, aided by the people in 
this Province. The friends of Goverment here have been so sunk, so 
abandon'd to despair, for some time, that it is hardly possible to make 
them believe the British Nation is determined to assert their just rights 
over the Colonies, & it is to very little purpose I mention the great 
force to the Northward, when it is not in my power to produce a single 
line from either of the Commanders in that part of America, to enable 
me to contradict the numberless falsehoods which are every day pro- 
pagated, & which does more mischief than I can express. This is a 
very disagreable subject for me to dwell on, but my Duty requires I 
should represent the true state of this Province, and of my unfortunate 
Vicinage of N. Carolina, & Georgia, which is equally neglected, equally 
abandon'd. Your Lordship will I am sure excuse my warmth when I 
acquaint you, that yesterday under colour of Law, they hanged & burned, 
an unfortunate wretch, a Free Negroe of considerable property, one of 
the most valuable, & useful men in his way, in the Province, on suspicion 
of instigating an Insurrection, for which I am convinced there was not 
the least ground. I could not save him My Lord ! the very reflection 
Harrows my Soul ! I have only the comfort to think I left no means 
untried to preserve him. They have now dipt their hands in Blood, 
God Almighty knows where it will end, but I am determined to remain 
till the last extremity in hopes to promote the King's Service, 'tho my 
familys being here, adds net a little to my distress. Another Act of Bar- 
barity, tho happily not of so tragical a Nature was committed a few days 
ago, on a poor man the Gunner of Fort Johnson, who for expressing his 
Loyalty was tarr'd, & feather'd 10 or 12 times, in different parts of the 
Town, & otherwise treated with great cruelty, stopping him at the doors 
of those Crown Officers who were most obnoxious ; & the Mob so grossly 
insulted M r MilJigen in particular who is Surgeon u to the Forts, & Garrisons 
in this Province, that he was under a necessity of taking refuge on board 
the King's Ship till the Packet Boat sails. I intend committing this 
Packet to the care of M r Milligen who I hope will have the honor of 
delivering it to Your Lordship. I beg leave to introduce him as a most 
honourable, worthy man, who has lived many years in this Province 
beloved, and respected by all ranks, till his Zeal for the King's service 
in these unhappy times, made him obnoxious to the Mob. This Gentle- 
man is perfectly acquainted with the state of the Province, & I can 
assure Your Lordship you may put entire confidence in his Honor & 
Veracity. I enclose with this a Letter I rec d from Coll. Fletchal with 
my answer : sorry am I to find myself unable to protect, or assist the 
King's Loyal Subjects here, it is a cruel mortification. I also send my 
answer to an Address from a society of Quakers, in the back part of the 
Country ; they consist of about 300 family's, & are warmly attached to 
Goverment. Your Lordship will likewise receive a Copy of an Oath 
tender'd to all those who refused to sign the Association, my own private 
Secretary not excepted, & a message I sent to the Assembly some days 
ago, with their answer, all which will plainly convince Your Lordship 
on what ticklish Ground we stand here. The Armed Vessel that was 
fitted out from this Port has seized a quantity of powder, part of it the 
property of His Majy on board a Ship lying off Augustine Bar in E. 
Florida, & carried it to Beaufort in this Province. Last sunday 30 of 
the Militia of this Town were sent to convey it here, & I am told that 
by one means or other, they have amass'd great quantities of warlike 
stores, ammunition particularly, which they can easily do, as there is 
no force by Sea, or Land to prevent them, & they allow Rice to be 



355 

exported on no other terms, but paying in Arms, & Ammunition. The 
new raised Troops which are quarter'd in the Barracks may be near 
800 consisting of Vagabonds & Thieves of all Countries, & the Charles 
Town Militia may be pretty near the same number. The Reg fc of Horse 
was to be raised in the back Country ; but I am told the levies there 
have been much check'd by Fletchal, Robinson, & one Cunningham, 
mention'd by Coll. Fletchal in his letter, who is a very active man, & 
remarkably spirited. M r Milligan will give Your Lordship a very par- 
ticular account of these matters that have fallen within his knowledge, 
as he is sensible, and intelligent. As the fate of the Crown Officers is 
not determined by the Comm e , if M r Innes is forced from me, which I 
will endeavor by all means to prevent, he has offer'd at any risk, to 
endeavor an escape into the back Country, join Co 1 Fletchal & endeavor 
to maintain his ground at Fort Charlotte, in concert with M r Cameron 
the Depy Superintendent, but I will not now think of that Scheme. I 
have the Honor to be with the most perfect Regard, My Lord Your 
Lordship's most Obliged & most Obed* H ble Serv fc William Campbell. 

" N.B. — I shall encourage the King's faithful Subjects as much as is 
in my power I can do no more. Some expence may be incurr'd by my 
Orders to Coll. Fletchal, I have no power to do it, but I cannot hesitate 
at such a juncture." 

In the hand of Secretary Innes, signed by Lord William Campbell. 
4 large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Charles Town. S° Carolina 19 th August 1775, Lord 
Will m Campbell, (N° 5). R/ 30 th Sept r . By M r Milligen. (6 In- 
cisures.) Ent d . 

Enclosures : — 

Colonel Thomas Fletchall to Lord William Campbell. 

1775, July 1 9. Ninety -six District, Fairferest. — Per Major Joseph 
Robinson. Assures him of the loyalty of about 4,000 in that 
district. Seizure of stores at Fort Charlotte by James Mason, 
John Caldwell and others on behalf of Congress. Subsequent 
capture of these men and said stores by some of the King's 
troops. Desirability of protecting the frontiers from incursions 
of the enemy and Indians. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — [by Secretary Innes'] for Letter N° 5, N° 1 — 
Coll. FletchaVs Letter. [And, in another hand] (1) In Lord 
W m Campbell's of 19 th August 1775. 

Lord William Campbell to Colonel Thomas Fletchall. 

1775, August 1. Charles Town. — Sends thanks to those ivho 
recaptured the stores and rebels at Fort Charlotte. Authorises 
him to fortify that place by his own and Colonel Neale's regi- 
ments. Regrets he cannot send further support. Desires 
M r Cameron Deputy Superintendent to assist him. Implores 
him to avoid giving offence and to do his utmost to preserve 
peace in his district. 

Copy in Innes's hand. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — [by Secretary Innes] for Letter N° 5 JS r ° 2. 
Governor's Answer to Coll. FletchaVs Letter. [And, in 

z 2 



356 



Enclosures — cont. 



another hand] In I d W m Campbell's of \Q th Angus * 
1775. 

Lord William Campbell to the Quakers in the back country. 

Answer to an address. Is pleased to receive assurances of their 
loyalty tvhich he will represent to the King and endeavour to 
preserve to them their privileges. 

Copy in the hand of Secretary Tnnes. If quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — [by Secretary Innes, for Iett r N° 5 K° 3. — 
Governors Answer to a Address sent from the Quakers in 
the back Country. [And, in another hand] In lord W m 
Campbell's of 19** August 1775. 

Lord William Campbell to the Commons House of Assembly, 

South Carolina. 

1775, August 15. Charles Town. — Message. Has been the 
spectator of outrages he little expected to have seen in this 
place. Refers to the Association and oath offered to officers 
of the Crown for signature. Deplores the cruelties practised 
in the town. Asks for their assistance in preserving order and 
enforcing the laws to ensure safety to property and lives. 
In Secretary Innes' s hand. 2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — [by Secretary Lines'] for LeW N° 5. JV° 5. — 
Governor' s Message to the Assembly. [And, in another 
hand] In Lord W™ Campbell's of 19** August 1775. 

South Carolina. 

1775, August 15. — Copy of the Oath tendered to those persons 
who have not signed the Association. 

In Secretary lnnes's hand. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — [by Secretary Innes] for Lett 1 ' JS° 5. N° 4. 
Oath tender'd to those who had refused to sign the 
Association. [And, in another hand] In Lord W m Camp- 
bell's of 19** August 1775. 

Commons House of Assembly. Answer to the Governor. 

1775, August 18. — Signed by Rawlins Lowndes, Speaker. Justi- 
fying the inhabitants of the colony for the measures taken to 
preserve their liberties in consequence of the oppression of the 
Ministry. They confess that the circumstances of last Saturday 
oftchich his Excellency so pathetically complains, amounted to 
an outrage but consider the punishment to the offender was 
not more severe than that often inflicted by the English on petti/ 
offenders. Will endeavour to promote his Lordship's personal 
safety. 

Original. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— for Letter N° 5. N° 6 Assembly's Ans r to the 
Governor's Message. [And, in another hand] In Lord 
W m Campbell's of 19** August 1775. 



357 

Lieutenant General Thomas Gage to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 19. Boston. — Would be glad if circumstances would 
permit of Colonel Grant's speedy return to Great Britain. Recom- 
mends the bearer Mr. Sewall, Attorney General of this Province, who 
has eiven him much assistance since his arrival here. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Gen. Gage, Aug. 19 th 1775, rec. M r Sewall. 

Jo. Irving to Sir George Collier. 

1775, August 20. "Somerset" at Boston.— " This Town still 
remains block'd up by Fifty Thousand Rebels who have fortifyed every 
Emminence near this Town, & for twenty Miles round it." " The 
Rebels in forty Whale Boats with 500 Men have burnt Cape Ann 
Light House as also Boston Light House, where they took a Party 
of 30 Marines and killed their officer .... Captain Linsey of the 
Falcon has miscarried in two Skirmishes," the one at Dartmouth 
near Rhode Island, the other at Cape Ann. Is in hopes of being 
ordered home though at present the ship is under orders to sail for 
Halifax. Privations of the troops ; ten transports arrived with pro- 
visions. List of ships left at Boston. Advantages that would accrue 
to the English if they could possess Rhode Island Harbour and the 
town of Providence. 

Copy. Intercepted. 3f folio pages. 



— Graves* to Thomas Graves at Thaneke, near Plymouth. 

1775, August 21. " Preston." — " I take this opportunity of writing to 
you by a Transport which carries home Mrs. Gage." Regrets to state 
that he fears the two commands do not draw together as well as is 
desirable for the sake of the service. Thinks his uncle pays too much 
attention to a parcel of sycophants, who are constantly about him ; " Old 
Hartwell " and Le Cras have too much ear of him. His uncle is also 
in disrepute with the army. There has been a disagreeable affair 
between the Admiral and Mr. Halowell, Commissioner of Customs, 
which was tried by court-martial, the sentence being " An error in 
judgment for disobedience of orders and neglect of duty." 

Copy. Intercepted. 1| folio pages. 

* The "Preston" had as 1st and 2nd lieutenants at this time Samuel and John 
Graves. 



Chevalier de Marolles de Luce to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1775, August 21. Paris. — Desiring to go to America. 
Autograph letter signed. 1 large folio page. French. 

Endorsed: — M. de Marolles de Lucie, Paris 21 Aug st 1775. 
Soliciting a Commission in the British Artillery. 



358 

Richard Penn and [Arthur] Lee to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 21. No. 2, Garden Court, Middle Temple.— Enclose 
copy of " an humble and earnest petition " from the Congress to the 
King. Propose to wait on his Lordship on Wednesday next with the 
original for his Lordship to present to His Majesty. 

Original in the third person. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed: — M r Penn & M r Lee 21 st August 1775. With Petition 
from the Congress. 

Enclosure : — 

Congress to the King. 

Petition. Representing that the union between the mother 
country and the colonies has been broken by a system of statutes 
and regulations made by His Majesty's ministers and enforced 
by hostile measures, and beseeching him to interpose with his 
royal authority and influence to procure them relief from that 
system and to direct some mode by which the applications of his 
faithful colonists may be improved into a happy and permanent 
reconciliation. 

Copy. 7J quarto pages. [ The original signed petition, 
delivered to Lord Dartmouth on the 1st September, is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 279, 
fo. 251.] 



John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 21. — Affairs in America appear to be as bad as possible. 
Has received a report of the defeat of the rebels on 14 July, but the 
enclosed copy of a letter from Corke seems to refute the intelligence. 
No news yet of Mr. Penn or his petition. 

Autograph letter signed. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .— M r Pownall 21 Aug. 1775. 



Francis Stuart to Thomas Cheap, Bedford Rovr. 

1775, August 21. Quebec. — The evil influence over the Canadians 
of some villains here disaffected to Government. Need of re-inforce- 
ment of troops and of examples to be made of those who oppose 
Government. A Highland Volunteer Regiment is being raised to serve 
during the present disturbances. Fifteen hundred Indians are anxious 
to go down upon the Bostonian Rebels, but are forbidden. Considers 
the Americans deserve no clemency as they are more savage than the 
Indians. Wishes lenient measures had never been adopted towards 
them. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2\ folio pages. 



David Barclay to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, 8th mo : (August) 23d. Youngsbury, near Ware. — From a 
persuasion that Lord Dartmouth will not think it impertinent, is 



359 

induced to intimate various opinions concerning the reception of the 
petition and the consequences that will result therefrom. He has 
received information on good authority that the Petition from the 
Congress was carried through by those who are heartily and most 
zealously inclined for conciliation, and every expression which could be 
considered exceptionable was studiously avoided. Others think it too 
humiliating. It is feared that if it meets with the same reception as 
former applications for redress, the effects will be to inflame the minds 
of those who yet remain moderate and make the breach irreparable. 
" They say, they have been told from high Authority, that if their 
Assemblies would petition separately, all their real Grievances should be 
redressed ; but they say also, that from Authority nearly equal, they 
have been inform'd their Cause is prejudged, by calling their Greivances 
pretended & not real. They think from the Reception of the New 
York Memorial there is no disposition, on this Side, for Eeconciiiation, 
& if my Information is well grounded, which I have reason to believe it 
is, Nothing can exceed their Firmness and Unanimity ; nor any thing 
be more affecting than the present Prospect." Dr. Smith's sermon 
shews the temper of the times and that it is not Dissenters only who 
are warm in the cause. Nothing but an anxious concern for the re- 
establishment of peace and tranquillity would have induced him to 
trouble Lord Dartmouth. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 J quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Barclay, 23 d of August, 1775. On the Petition 
from the Congress and American Affairs. 



American Anecdotes. 

1775, August 23. — Nine remarks showing his sentiments on the 
American war. What ought to have been done and what can yet be 
done to subdue the rebellion. '* Copies of this may be taken and used as 
accords the Author requests that the Original be shewen to no person 
whoever " 

Original. Signed J. M. 2 quarto pages. 
Endorsed : — American Anecdotes. Aug st l77o. 



John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 23. — " My Lord, I know of nothing at present, but 
this hitherto invisible Petition, that can or ought to prevent you in any 
plan you may wish to pursue." Has heard that this petition is in the 
hands of Messrs. Burke, Lee and Bollan to whom the Congress con- 
signed it, so expects his Lordship will be required in London in a day 
or two. Sends another draft of the proclamation showing the 
alterations it has undergone ; it is supposed to pass the Council today. 
Transmits two letters for his signing. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall 23 Aug. — 75. 



360 

Gavin Cochrane to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 24. Duke's Court, St. Martin's Lane. — " My Lord, 
Dining yesterday at A friends, there happened to be there a half pay 
Officer who had lately come from America ; he had been prisoner with 
the Rebels At Crown Point, had made his escape And got to Canada, 
from whence he came home." This officer's name is Lieutenant Grant 
of the 42 d Regiment and he will introduce him to his Lordship if 
desired. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Cochrane 24 Aug. 1775, with Information of the 
Rebels' Proceedings at Lake Champlain. 



Lord Dartmouth to Richard Penn and Arthur Lee. 

1775, August 24. S 1 .* — Has just received by post their note of the 
21st instant which would have been sent to him by express if it had 
been known at his office that they had any commands for him. Will 
return to London in a day or two, and will not fail to inform them of 
his arrival. 

Autograph, rough draft. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a note to M r Penn & M r Lee, Sand 11 24 Aug. 
1775. 

* Sandwell, his Lordship's seat near Birmingham. 



Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 24. Caroline Park. — " Am heartily glad that the Eyes 
of People begin to be open'd, and their Spirits roused. Nothing but 
the most wilfull and obstinate Blindness can prevent their seeing that 
the two Actions near Boston were the consequences of a long pre- 
meditated, regular, and well laid Plan ; nor need any General, whom I 
have the Honour of knowing, be ashamed either of the Dispositions 
for Battle, or Blockade of the Town ; which appear to me Masterly. 
Those who believe them to be the result of chance or hasty 
Resolutions are capable of believing anything. "We hear much talk of 
conciliatory Proposals from the Congress, and Suspensions of Arms. 
The one must be fallacious, the other pernicious to the last degree : the 
Purport of both to gain time. The Congress I see have assumed the 
Republican Title ; and, I doubt not, are pretty far advanced in their 
Plan of Government ; the Winter may ripen it into a consistancy not 
easily to be dissolved. Their Army want to get in their Harvist, sow 
their Grounds, and prepare for the next campaign. Treating with 
Rebels, while they have Arms in their Hands, would demonstrate a 
Weakness in Government which no Victory could compensate for. If 
they are sincere let them lay down their Arms, and implore Pardon : 
if they refuse to do that they mean to deceive ; and, though they may 
pretend to disclaim Independancy, they assume it in the strongest 
Manner, if they expect to treat upon equal Terms with a Sovereign 
against whom they are in actual Rebellion and a Nation whose Power 
and Authority they absolutely disclaim. No Terms which do not 



361 

establish their Independance will be adhered to longer than suits their 
present necessities ; and we shall find them much more formidable when 
we are next obliged to enter the Lists with them. At present we have 
it in our Power to reduce them by dint of Distress, and nothing ebe 
will make them submit." 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 



Lord Townshend to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 24. Rainham. — A Norwich manufacturer has refused 
an order for a large exportation of goods to Norfolk, Virginia, as he 
was too busy with demands from Germany, Capture by the Americans 
of a ship from London laden with stores. " Our " ordnance ship has put 
into Portsmouth where it is hoped she has escaped the storm and found 
convoy. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — L d Townshend 24 Aug. 1775, relative to a large Demand 
of Manufactures for Exportation from Norwich. 



Thomas Jefferson to [ ]. 

1775, August 25. Monticello. — " Dear Sir, I received your message 
by mr. Braxton & immediately gave him an order on the Treasurer for 
the money, which the Treasurer assured me should be answered on his 
return, t now send the bearer for the violin & such musick appurtaining 
to her as may be of no use to the young ladies. I believe you had no 
case to her, if so, be so good as to direct Watt Lenox to get from Prentis's 
some bags or other coarse woollen to wrap her in, & then to pack her 
securely in a wooden box. 

I am sorry the situation of our country should render it not eligible 
to you to remain longer in it. I hope the returning wisdom of Great 
Britain will e'er long put an end to this unnatural contest, there may 
be people to whose tempers & dispositions Contention may be pleasing, & 
who may therefore wish a continuance of confusion, but to me it is of 
all states, but one, the most horrid my first wish is a restoration of our 
just rights ; my second a return of the happy period when, consistently 
with duty, I may withdraw myself totally from the public stage & pass 
the rest of my days in domestic ease & tranquillity, banishing every 
desire of afterwards ever hearing what passes in the world, perhaps 
ardour for the latter may add considerably to the warmth of the former 
wish, looking with fondness towards a reconciliation with Great 
Britain, I cannot help hoping you may be able to contribute towards 
expediting this good work. I think it must be evident to yourself that 
the ministry have been deceived by their officers on this side the water 
who (for what purposes I cannot tell) have constantly represented the 
American opposition as that of a small faction ; in which the body of 
the people took little part, this you can inform them of your own 
knolege to be untrue, they have taken it into their heads too that 
we are cowards & shall surrender at discretion to an armed force, the 
past & future operations of the war must confirm & undeceive them on 
that head. I wish they were thoroughly & minutely acquainted with 
every circumstance relative to America as it exists in truth. I am 



362 

persuaded this would go far towards disposing them to reconciliation, 
even those in parliament who are called friends to America seem to know 
nothing of our real determinations. I observe they pronounced in the 
last parliament that the Congress of 1774 did not mean to insist 
vigorously on the terms they held out, but kept something in reserve to 
give up ; & in fact that they would give up everything but the article 
of taxation, now the truth is far from this, as I can affirm, & put my 
honor to the assertion ; & their continuance in this error may perhaps 
have very ill consequences, the Congress stated the lowest terms they 
thought possible to be accepted in order to convince the world they 
were not unreasonable, they gave up the monopoly & regulation of trade, 
& all the acts of parliament prior to 1764, leaving to British generosity 
to render these at some future time as easy to America as the interest of 
Britain would admit, but this was before blood was spilto I cannot 
affirm, but have reason to think, these terms would not now be accepted. 
I wish no false sense of honor, no ignorance of our real intentions, no 
vain hope that partial concessions of right will be accepted may induce 
the ministry to trifle with accomodation till it shall be put even out of 
our own power ever to accomodate, if indeed Great Britain, disjoined 
from her colonies, be a match for the most potent nations of Europe 
with the colonies thrown into their scale, they may go ovi securely, but 
if they are not assured of this, it would be certainly unwise, by trying 
the event of another campaign, to risque our accepting a foreign aid 
which perhaps may not be obtainable but on a condition of everlasting 
avulsion from Great Britain, this would be thought a hard condition 
to those who still wish for reunion with their parent country. I am 
sincerely one of those, & would rather be independance on Great Britain, 
properly limited, than on any nation upon earth, or than on no nation, 
but I am one of those too who rather than submit to the right of 
legislating for us assumed by the British parliament, & which late 
experience has shewn they will so cruelly exercise, would lend my hand 
to sink the whole island in the ocean. 

If undeceiving the minister as to matters of fact may change his dis- 
positions, it will perhaps be in your power by assisting to do this, to 
render service to the whole empire, at the most critical time certainly 
that it has ever seen, whether Britain shall continue the head of the 
greatest empire on earth, or shall return to her original station in the 
political scale of Europe depends perhaps on the resolutions of the 
succeeding winter, god send they may be wise & salutary for us all ! 

I shall be glad to hear from you as often as you may be disposed to 
think of things here, you may be at liberty I expect to communicate 
some things consistently with your honor & the duties you will owe to 
a protecting nation, such a communication among individuals may be 
mutually beneficial to the contending parties, on this or any future 
occasion if I affirm to you any facts, your knolege of me will enable you 
to decide on their credibility ; if I hazard opinions on the dispositions 
of men, or other speculative points, you can only know they are my 
opinions. My best wishes for your felicity attend you wherever you 
go, & believe me to be assuredly Your friend & serv*. 

P.S. my collection of classics & of books of parliamentary learning 
particularly is not so complete as I could wish, as you are going to the 
land of literature & of books you may be willing to dispose of some of 
yours here & replace them there in better editions. I should be willing 
to treat on this head with any body you may think proper to empower 
for that purpose." 



363 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. [Reproduced in B. F. 
Stevens's Facsimiles of Manuscripts in European Archives relating to 
America.] 

Note. — Thomas Jefferson, as delegate from Virginia, had taken his seat in Congress 
on the 21st June previous. In the following year he was one of the committee who 
drew up the Declaration of Independence. Minister at Paris, 1784 ; President of 
the United States, 1801. 



Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775. August 25. Caroline Park. — Sees with regret the obstinacy 
with which the Bostonians persist in refusing obedience to the British 
Legislature but sees at the same time the absolute necessity for per- 
severing in those judicious measures which have been adopted to bring 
them to a sense of their duty. The smallest relaxation would now be 
fatal. Their spirits are kept up at present by their factious leaders and 
preachers, by the seditious papers and hopes of a change of measures 
" which our Opposition here flatters them with at the opening of a new 
Parliament. That they not only aspire at Independency, but flatter 
themselves with the Hopes of a Separate Sovereignty, has been long 
known, nor have they scrupled to avoid it. . . It is to our interest to 
nip those hopes in the bud ; sensible men however fond of the idea must 
see the Absurdity of it, and that their Utopian State can never exist 
but in the interior wilds of that vast continent, while Britain is Master 
of the Fleet." Returns thanks for his interposition with Lord North 
" in behalf of our Chappie " ; had mentioned in a former letter that the 
sum required for purchasing a pew in perpetuity and filling it up 
properly was £200 ; encloses receipt for whatever his L d P may be so 
good as to bestow. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — S r Adolphus Oughton 12 Aug. 1774 (sic). Sentiments 
on America &c. 



Paul Wentworth to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, August 25. Poland Street. — He has authentic information 
that the adherents of Breakenridge and Hawley were actors in the 
seizure of Ticonderoga &c. He holds such conduct in detestation and 
though he was disposed to solicit their relief from the oppressive New 
York government he can no longer take any measures for their pro- 
tection and wishes to withdraw all papers sent to the Board on their 
behalf. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Wentworth 25 th August, 1775, respecting the 
People on the Back of N. Hampshire assisting the Rebels in the 
Seizure of Ticonderago. 



William Tongue. 

1775, August 29. No. 49 Prescott Street, Groodmansfields, London. 
— Memorial. That in the year 1759 the subscriber left England for 
New York, with a considerable cargo of merchandize. Recounts the 



364 

losses lie sustained in the opposition to the Stamp Act, and his 
different movements. Is author of " the Times delineated " said to be 
annexed [not here]. Necessity for his quitting the province to avoid 
being embroiled in the rebellion. His arrival at Georgia. Note received 
from the " Friends of America " there requesting his departure in seven 
days. Desires employment in the service of Government. 
Original, signed. 3 pages. 

Endorsed .— W m Tongue's Memorial, R/ 29 th August 1775, (with 
3 In closures). 

Enclosure : — 

1775, June 7, 10 and 11. Savannah in Georgia. — Paper con- 
taining depositions and information dated 7 June against 
Joseph Habersham and others " The Friends of America in 
Georgia " for ordering Mess rs Tongue, Laic, White and 
Gumersall to quit the province in seven days or abide by the 
consequences. There is a copy of a Warrant issued by Anthony 
Stokes, thief Justice 10 June against the said Habersham, 
and a request by William Tongue to waive the prosecution. 
To the whole is given a signed and sealed certificate by the 
Chief Justice dated 11 June. 
Certified copies. 13 1 pages. 

Endorsed; — With M r Tongue's Memorial of 2§ th August 
1775. (3) dr 



Lieutenant D'Auvergne to Captain Phipps. 

1775, August 30. "Asia." New York. — "Captain Wallace who 
commands at Rhode Island has detected some Letters from the Congress 
to General Washington and others." These letters show that Congress 
is aiming at total Independence from Great Britain and John Adams 
asks for assistance in certain measures to be undertaken by him in 
establishing a new Government. Express received from Boston where 
all was then quiet. 

Extract. Intercepted. ■§ folio page. 



Mrs. Wjlkins to her husband Isaac Wilkins. 

1775, August 30. Castle Hill. — "Colonel Lewis Morris is gone to 
the Ohio with Doctor Franklin & some other gentlemen of the Congress 
to try if they cannot prevail with the Indians to stand neuter in this 
unhappy dispute; he came to see me before he went & to assure me he 
was not the Author of the Humbug that drove you to England, as it is 
said he was." 

Extract, Intercepted. \ folio page. 



Governor Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 31. Charlestown. — Abstract of his letter No. 6. 
The situation and disposition of the province of S. Carolina. 

4 folio pages. [The original signed letter with enclosures is in the 
Public Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 229, 
io. 445.] 



365 

Enclosures .-— 

1775, August 17. Charles Town. — Report of the Judges and 
Attorney General of South Carolina — Thomas Knox Gordon, 
Edward Savage. William Gregory, and James Simpson — on the 
case of Jerry, a free negro, under sentence of death. Addressed 
to Governor Lord William Campbell. 
Copy. Z\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Report of the Judges in the Case of Jerry, a 
free Negro, condemned in So. Carolina, In Lord W m 
'Campbell's (N° 6) o/31** August 1775. 

1775, June 16. South Carolina, Charles Town District. — 
Evidence given upon the trial of Jerry before John Coram, 
Justice of the Peace, This Jerry icas executed on the charge 
of instigating an insurrection amongst the slaves. 
Copy. 1 % folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Copy of the Evidence given upon the Trial of 
Jerry (a free Negro) and referred to in the Report of the 
Judges $ Atty. Genl. In Lord W m Campbell's (N 6) 
q/"31^ August 1775. 

John Ewing to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 31. No. 25, Ludgate Street. — Rejoices in the interest 
taken by His Majesty in the arts and sciences, especially astronomy. 
Suggests that astronomical observations could be more effectually and 
speedily accomplished by another Observatory at Philadelphia. 

Autograph letter sig?ied. 1^ quarto pages. 

Endorsed .-—'Rev. M r Ewing 31 Aug. 1775. 

[Governor Francis Legge] to Lieutenant General Thomas 

Gage. 

1775, August 31. Halifax.— 

Tic o copies not signed. 3^ and 4 folio pages respectively. [The 
autograph signed letter is amongst the MSS. of Lord Dartmouth 
already reported upon. Eleventh Report, Appendix, Part V, p. 385.] 

Governor Josiah Martin to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, August 31. "Cruizer" Sloop of War in Cape Fear River, 
North Carolina. — Private. Introducing the bearer Mr. Robert Hogg, a 
merchant of first consideration in the colony who has been compelled by 
popular clamour exercised towards him on account of his loyalty to 
leave the country. Recommends him as well fitted to represent to his 
Lordship the true state of this colony. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 folio page. 

Endorsed : — Gov r Martin, Aug 31, 1775, recom. M r Hogg. 

Proclamation. 

N. D. [1775, August.] — George III. Draft of Proclamation for 
suppressing Rebellion and Sedition. 
2\ folio pages. 

Endorsed : — D ft of Proclamation. 



366 



Information obtained from two French Officers. 

[1775, August.] — Paper not signed, dated nor addressed. Endorsed 
"Intelligence." "What I have been able to collect from the two 
French Officers by employing every art and all the Address I am Master 
of, amounts to what follows : — 

IC 1st. That they have been over great part of the American Continent, 
particularly at Philadelphia, at New York, Rhode Island, and New 
England, which with their stay in and about Boston, would have 
required more time to perform than the three Months they say they 
remained in America. 

" 2d. That they are particularly acquainted with Putnam and Ward. 
— the first they represent to be a good natured Civil and brave old 
Soldier — but a head strong, ignorant and stupid General — Ward they 
hold indeed very cheap. 

" That they were both in person at the Affair of Lexington, and from 
circumstances they cited, I am induced to think that they were present 
at the Affair of the 17th. 

" 4. That they were courted by the Rebels to stay amongst them, 
and were offered forty Pounds g Month each, of pay — they say 
they did not think such Offers solid, nor did they like the paper 
Currency. 

" 5. That there are at least 200 french amongst the Troops of the 
Rebels, who acted as Artillerists and Engineers, which numbers may be 
augmented since they came away. 

" 6. That the Rebel Officers in general are perfectly ignorant of 
their business, and they esteem them men of very moderate, or rather 
mean parts, — but the private men are well trained to the handling of 
Arms, and remarkably well armed, particularly in the Articles of 
Firelocks and Bayonets. 

" 7. That they saw the Fortifications on the Posts of Roxbury and 
Cambridge and also the Park of Artillery the Rebels have in the 
neighbourhood of the last place consisting of Canons, Mortars and 
Howitzers, concerning the quality of which they do not agree — Le 
Comte de Beauvouloir says, — they are equal in quality and Bore to those 
employed in Europe, and he only found them defective in the Article 
of the Carriages, which he said are of a bad Construction. — his friend 
the Engineer (whom I heard called Le Chev r d'Ambroise) held the 
Artillery rather cheap in general, but perticularly the Mortars which 
are small. — they both agreed that the Rebels were in want of Ammu- 
nition, particularly of powder, and insinuated that they might be 
greatly distressed by being Canonaded from Posts well chosen and 
properly fortified. 

" 8. That during their stay in America, Seven french Ships, masked 
under English Colours came into different ports with Ammunition &c. 
and that these Ships would have risked an Engagement rather than 
Submit to be visited by a small Ship of War, had they beeu met 
by one. 

" 9. That the Americans expected French and Spanish Officers and 
Engineers, also Powder &c. to be carried over from time to time in 
small numbers and small quantities, not only by Ships directly from 
England & our West Indies, but by French and Spanish Ships from 
their Islands, such Ships to appear to be American property, and to be 
manned chiefly with American Sailors, that the European Courts may 
not be detected, should such Ships be taken. 

" 10. That the common people in America have been worked up to 



367 

a pitch of enthusiastick phrensy that is beyond conception, and such 
was their Confidence (when they came away) that they were convinced 
His Majesty's Troops would be entirely defeated, and driven on board 
the Ships in less than two- Months, and indeed the Rebel Chiefs 
employed every Art to keep up their Spirit and enforce such Ideas, 
some of which they themselves were witness to, such as making their 
own people put on English Regimentals and come into the Camp in the 
Character of Officers and Soldiers deserting from His Majesty's Troops, 
and one Man personated a Member of Parliament. — but that the Chiefs 
begun to despond, and to reflect on the Consequences of their Rebellion, 
which in time might drive them to call in foreign Succours, which is 
the situation France and Spain look out for. 

" 11. Lastly, that it appears to them both, the Americans had no 
settled, regular, well digested plan, that there exists among their Chiefs 
more Jealousy than unanimity : that many of the Settlers, and mostly 
all the Commercial people of Substance, begun to be tired of the present 
situation, and that they (the two french Officers) thought it probable 
Government would fall on Methods to disunite them, which if employed 
with success, would necessarily facilitate a reconciliation. 

" By stimulating the pride of Monsieur Le Comte de Beauvouloir in 
the moment that some Vin de Champagne produced the desired effect 
on his prudence, he told me that he had had two Audiences of Le 
Comte de Guines; that his Excellency had made him great offers of 
Service and had asked him twice to dinner, which for particular 
Reasons he had not profited of, but that his Brother (the Gentleman 
who lost his trunk and who returned to France on Saterday) dined 
with the Ambassador on Thursday, which prevented his dining with 
me, and being of the party to Greenwich. My Opinion is that the two 
french Officers are at this Instant in the Service of the Rebel Americans, 
and are paid by them ; that they came over either with proposals to 
the Courts of France and Spain, or some other Commission in the 
American Interests, and that they intend to return to their Employers 
by means of some English Ship. They hinted to me that they were 
not alone of their kind in London. They mentioned a Spanish Officer 
in the Sea Service, who speaks English very well, and who Lodges at 
Lime House, and as we passed the Frigates and Transport Ships fitting out 
at Deptford, they told me they were intended for America, and appeared 
well informed of every particular relative to the affairs of America." 

4| folio pages. [The original of this, marked " Rec d 6 th August " is 
in the Public Record Office, America and West Indies, Vol. 670, fo. 35.] 

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas James. 

N. D. [1775, August.] — Paper headed " Lieutenant Colonel James's 
Observations upon the present State of Affairs at Boston, and the 
absolute necessity of sending out immediately Troops, Ships of War, 
Sailors &ca. &ca. &ca. as undermentioned." " To bring this Rebellion 
to a happy Issue, the British Army must consist of 30,000 Effective 
Men, at least." 

Not signed. 7 \ quarto pages. 

Endorsed ; — Col. James's Propositions for reducing the Rebels. 

[Governor Legge] to [ ]. 

N. D. [1775, August]. — Letter not signed nor addressed, but in 
Gov. Legge's hand, beginning " Sir Your letter of the 3 d Insfant is 



308 



an 



now before me, and I observe the Steps you have taken, on 
Apprehension, that the parts around Windsor were in danger, from 
the Rebels at Machious." Commends caution in real danger but warns 
him against false alarms which are spread to disturb His Majesty's 
subjects. Militia will be ready for defence and he will do all in his 
power for the protection and safety of every good subject. 
1 quarto page. 



[Lord Dartmouth] to Sir Stanier Porten. 

1775, September 2. Whitehall. — "Having received repeated In- 
formation, that a traitorous Correspondence is suspected to be carried 
on with the Rebels in North America, by Letters conveyed thither in 
American Ships clearing out in Ballast from the different ports in this 
Kingdom" he sends a list of ships and suspected persons. Three 
letters which he also encloses were brought to him last night by the 
brother of Dorrett whose name is mentioned iti the Information, and 
which he told him had been left at Princes Street Coffee House since 
the examination of Mrs. Leslie. The originals have been returned to 
Dorrett with directions to watch the person who may come to the 
Coffee House for them. 

Draft. 3 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Dra* to Sir Stanier Porten. 2 d September 1775./. 

(seperate). 

Wrapper endorsed: — 2 d Sept r 1775. Dra ts (secret Intelligence) 

m 
i p 1 M [and, in the King's hand] -? p* 4 p.m. 

Enclosures : — 

List of Ships and suspected persons on board destined for 
America. The list of ships begins with the " Neptune" Captain 
Collins, Philadelphia, the others are the u Fame" " Beaufort" 
and " Robert" and the names of suspected persons are Edward 
Searle, Major Wrixon, Captain Devereux, Captain Crawford 
and three foreigners supposed to be officers and Germans. 
These men are known to be disaffected to the Government and 
suspected of dangerous designs and are probably the bearers of 
letters. 

M.S. Probably Copy. § folio page. 

Minutes of Information given by M r Taitt. " M r Taitt. an eminent 
Upholsterer in New Street Hanover Square, called this Morning, 
August 80 th , upon M r Pownall, and acquainted him, that a 
Friend of his (M r TaitVs) had revealed to him a xery extra- 
ordinary Circumstance of publick Intelligence." Alex. Dorrett 
is acquainted with M rs Leslie of a Coffee House Leicester Fields 
who knew the Pretender and states that he is in Engl d and that 
she has had an interview with him. Information respecting 
letters at her house. Account of interview held with Dorrett and 
M rs Leslie at Lord Dartmouth' 's office on 31 August. 
1 folio pages. 

1775, August 8. — Letter signed T. W. addressed to C. W. J. at 
Princes Street Coffee House, Princes Street, Leicester Fields. 



369 

Enclosures — cont. 

As yet they have had no foreign letters but hope by the con- 
veyance of their Friend in Mil ford Haven they will receive 
proper Instructions. The movements of His Highness are knoion 
only to M rs Leslie. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1^ folio pages. 

Letter from Simon Dalton to C. W. J. " Sir I shall be glad to 
know your Orders as to what comes from Milford Haven." 
Hamilton wrote that Brown will have all ready in five Days. 
Hopes that things will be as faithfully obeyed in the other 
quarter as they are in this. Desires him to ask His Highness 
the particulars of their orders. 

Copy. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

1775, August 18. — Letter from N. B. to M r Statuvell (gy. Hat- 
well) to the care of M rs Leslie. " Dear Friend I received yours 
and I make no doubt of the JVidcivs punctuality, its only your 
fears that makes you apprehend the Seal being cracked is only 
your anxiety" Is now at the D. of N's who assures him the 
money is at a moment's warning and if his Highness had 
received the intelligence once of the landing at Milford Haven, 
the day will be ihrir own. Has received a letter from D. of Q. 
and proposes her taking a house in the country. All is going 
on according to their wishes and she states " that George looks 
very sour mouthed especially at his regiments" 
Copy. Intercepted. \ ^ fc Ho pages. 



Lord Dartmouth to Sir Stanier Ported. 

J 775, September 2. Whitehall. — Since his separate letters of this 
morning, he has again seen Dorrett, who says Mrs. Leslie has told him 
that the person who calls for letters left in her care has carried them 
to a coffee house or hotel somewhere near Bow Church. 

Draft. | page. 



Richard Ford and Company to Walter Franklin, New York. 

1775, September 2. London. — " We are sorry to see your Americans 
go from one state of Madness to another." They are taking great 
pains to destroy themselves, for such must result from their present 
conduct. The partner of their firm has been appointed British Consul 
at Bania. Notwithstanding the restrictions laid upon their commerce, 
any ship dispatched from New York to Falmouth for orders may 
proceed afterwards with her cargo to any European port. 

Extract. Intercepted. | folio page. In a wrapper marked — Secret 
from M r T— d [Todd]. 



Prince de Masserano to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 2. Great George Street. — Thanks him for a copy 
of orders sent to the Governor of West Florida respecting the Indians 
y 82140. a a 



370 

settled on Spanish territories. Will inform his court of his Lordship's 
endeavours to preserve harmony between the subjects of the two 
nations. 

Autograph letter in the third person. 1 quarto page. French. 
[A copy of this letter is in the archives at Alcala de Henares.] 

Endorsed: — Le Prince de Masserano 2 Sep. 1775. 



The Keverend George Panton to the Reverend Doctor 

Chandler. 

1775, September 2. Trenton. — The people in general are beginning 
to think more seriously of the probable consequence of the dispute, but 
there is no relaxation in military preparations and the same unanimity 
prevails. He supposes England knows that the country is entirely out 
of her hands, and that no civil officer can exert any power unless 
directed by Congress. 

Extract. Intercepted, f folio page. [This, with other intercepted 
letters in this month, was found in a wrapper marked — Communications 
from M r Todd Oct. 11.] 



P[aul] W[entworth] to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 2. Saturday. 

Autograph letter not signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r P. W — th Sep r 1775, proposing that the Lands 
West of Connecticut River may be declared extra-provincial. Ex. 



Moses Franks to John Harris Cruger. 

1775, September 4. Teddington. — Is uncertain how long com- 
munication will be allowed them. Has noted well his letter of 5 July 
on business in general, yet finds remittances come from Philadelphia, 
Virginia and even Boston, so hopes New York will not stand alone in 
forbearance. " What has private Faith, Credit, and confidential Trust 
to do with the publick Disagreement ?" Asks him to apply this thought 
to someone whose name he will not mention as he knows all letters are 
opened. Private affairs. Has recently seen Mr. Penn with the petition 
from Congress. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1J folio pages. [This, with the following and 
several other intercepted letters in this month, was found in a wrapper 
marked — Secret from M r T — d.] 



Moses Franks to the Honourable Oliver de Lancey, 

New York. 

1775, September 4. Teddington. — " I wish I could tell you anything 
agreable from this Side relative to the unhappy Differences between 
this Country and yours." Fears little more is left than a communication 
of good wishes as no proclamation can impede such or offence be taken 
from them. Government regrets " that there ever existed Spirits 
discordant enough to seek importance in confusion ." 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio page. 



371 

A. Pepperrell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 4. Portsmouth. — Gives an account of the 
examination to which he was subjected on his arrival at Portsmouth 
and he is now confined in the town till matters are more settled. 
Disturbed state of the country, especially at Boston and Portsmouth. 
Could live peaceably here if he acted as deceitfully as some others do. 
Desires some appointment. 

Autograph letter signed. 8 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — A. Pepperell Esq r 4 Sep r 1775. 



J. Robertson to Isaac Wilkins. 

1775, September 4. Wt. Chester. — '* My Friend S — y spent the 
Afternoon with me last Saturday, but seemed plaguily down in the 
Mouth." He fears lest the Provincial troops should make a conquest 
of all Canada where General Carleton is but weak in numbers. General 
Montgomery is gone from Ticonderoga with 2,400 men to attack 
St. Johns and is to be re-inforced with others. Schuyler is at 
Ticonderoga and two battalions of York soldiers have gone up 
commanded by Major Ritzmore and Major Zedwitz. 

Extract. Intercepted, \ folio page. 



[ ] to the Reverend Doctor Myles Cooper or to 

Isaac Wilkins. 

1775, September 4. — The writer wishes he were with them in 
England. Persecution of the Tories in America. Has heard that the 
Lord Mayor of London had obliged the King to declare that no more 
troops should be sent there, wishes none had been sent unless with 
a better commander. Presbyterians in New York petitioned for a 

charter and G r has favoured their request. Seabury does not 

write, as it would be prejudicial to him if it were known he kept 
up correspondence with such Tories. Has advised bim to follow 
Auch — — y's (Auchmuty's) example. Fears if some severe check is not 
soon given, officers of the Crown and friends of Government will be 
seized as hostages and afterwards either accommodation with Great 
Britain be settled or Independency proclaimed. Would like to know 
what they can expect from England so as personally to act accordicgly* 

Copy. Intercepted. 4| folio pages. 



Gilbert Barkly to William Strahan. 

1775, September 5. Philadelphia. — " The Situation of Affairs in 
this Country is in the same inflamed manner it has been for some 
time past." The King's troops continue at Boston and the Provincials 
are strongly encamped near. It is expected they will keep on the 
defensive in hopes of some success attending the last petition to the 
King. Is well acquainted with many of the provincial members of 
the Congress and has assisted in composing the petition and if com- 
missioners are appointed to settle differences hopes to be of further 
service. Asks that the enclosed may be forwarded to Grey Cooper. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

a A 2 



372 

John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 5. — Signifying the King's approval of the orders 
contained in the draft of a letter to General Hows. Lieutenant-Colonel 
James who delivered a dispatch from General Gage, left Boston on 
30 July when the Rebels were collecting their whole force and he 
thinks they mean an attack on Boston, which the Generals were 
preparing to prevent, "Disease has I find long prevailed in our Camp 
and desertion the Consequence of despair had begun to take place." 
Apologises for opening the private letter from General Burgoyne. 

Autograph letter signed. 2§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall, Sept. 1775, relative to Dispatches rec d 
from Boston, &c. 

Joshua Steele to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 5. Margaret Street, Cavendish Square. — The 
enclosed plan has long been the subject of his thoughts as he foresaw 
the tempest. Had sounded some of the American Agents on the 
practicability of such a mode of Government eleven years ago and 
believes it would still be received with cordial sincerity. Assures his 
Lordship he is no less actuated by the Amor Patriae, than by the concern 
he is under for his West Indian property which suffers from loss of the 
American markets. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Steele, 5 tb Sept. 1775. With a Speculation for a new 
Constitution. 

Enclosure : — 

Plan for a new Constitution for America. In Steele's hand. 
Believes the present differences have arisen from the various 
constructions put upon the word Constitution. Traces its 
meaning from their history, and views it in various positions 
and at different periods. Propositions for the future government 
of America. 
8 quarto pages, 

W alter and Thomas Buchanan and Co. to George and 
John Buchanan, Glasgow. 

1775, September 6. New York. — The Snow " Peggy " is not 
arrived. They are informed she has goods for Georgia but expect she 
will not be allowed to land them as that state has come into the association 
of the rest of the provinces. Dreadful consequences will ensue if 
conciliatory measures are not soon agreed upon. Earnest wishes for a 
speedy reconciliation. 

Extract. Intercepted. | folio page. 



T. B. Chandler to the Reverend Mr. Inglis, New York. 

1775, September 6. London. — No prospect of change of measures 
here. Stocks in a flourishing state and manufacturers fully employed. 
The newspapers abound with the most indecent reflexions upon 
Government and the grossest misrepresentations of facts. Shows how 



373 

both sides have been deceived by false accounts. Thinks, now that 
things are better understood, it is time to negotiate. If no accom- 
modation is made, more vigorous measures will be taken to reduce the 
Colonies as he has been assured that fifty millions of money can be raised 
to carry on the war if necessary. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2 J folio pages. 

John Coxe to James Bogle French, Swithins Lane, London. 

1775, September 6. Philadelphia. — This port will be shut up on 
the 10th of this month and the merchants are preparing to leave the 
harbour. The people are in good spirits and soldiers to a man, they are 
taking precautions to save the city, which is difficult to be got at, and 
will soon be out of the reach of a British Navy. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

William Donaldson to Peter N. B. Livingston, New York. 

1775, September 6. London. — He fears, by their having red wax 
over the black wafer, that his letters of 23 June have been opened ere 
they reached him. Is concerned at the present critical and alarming 
situation. Private intercourse is rendered precarious by such conduct 
as above and a proclamation which has lately been issued here. 

Extract. Intercepted. J folio page. 

Jacob Franks to Moses Levy, Newport, Rhode Island. 

1775, September 6. London. — The circumstances of the times and 
the late proclamation forbid his sending money to America ; will there- 
fore keep it for Levy's disposal unless he desires to put it into hands 
less scrupulous. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

Alexander Gillon to Edward Van Harthals. 

1775, September 6. New York. — The Continental Congress which 
was to meet again yesterday will doubtless continue their spirited 
opposition tho' ready to accept any tolerable proposals. Wishes peace 
and prosperity might again be restored then England will feel the 
benefits of American trade. Sets out for Philadelphia to-morrow and 
hopes to go to Carolina the 15th of next month. 

Extract. Intercepted. f folio page. [This and the three fore- 
going were originally within wrappers marked as having been received 
from M r Todd, Secretary to the Post Office.] 

Vice-Admiral Graves to Philip Stephens. 

1775, September 6. Boston. — "Lieut. Grant's Letters contain 
very long Accounts of the People of Georgia's Proceedings in sending 
Delegates to the Congress, tumultuously assembling in the Cause of 
Liberty, threatening those who do not join them, and even vowing to 
destroy the St. John Schooner. But we are so accustomed to this 
Language and Treatment, that I will not trouble you with the relation 
of what Mr. Grant experienced at Savannah.*' 

Extract. \ folio page. [The signed letter is in the Public Record 
Office, series Admirals Despatches, North America, Vol. 6.] 



374 

William Strahan to Doctor Benjamin Franklin. 

1775, September 6. London. — Begrets to hear matters are thought 
to have gone too far for an accommodation and that things tend towards 
a separation. Consequences of such to America. Considers she will 
suffer more in a few years of contest than the amount of all the taxes 
the British Parliament would have imposed on her for a century. Has 
read the last petition to the King ; it appears to be written in loose 
terms and after he (Franklin) was convinced that words and arguments 
were of no use. Thinks America has more reason to dread being 
enslaved by some of her own citizens than by the British Senate and 
that the contest will greatly endanger these very liberties they have 
taken up arms to defend. 

Extract. Intercepted. (From M r Todd.) 1J folio pages. 



Governor William Tryon to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 6. New York. — Private. Introduces Captain Foy, 
representing his persecution by the malignity of the times. Estimated 
strength of Provincials at Ticonderoga and reported future movements. 
Five hundred Indians have been at Albany to receive the presents sent 
them by the Continental Congress, it is thought they will preserve a 
neutrality. Guy Johnson forced to flee to Canada and Franklin 
rumoured as successor. Colonel Lewis Morris is gone to Pittsburgh to 
engage the Indians there. The enclosed letter he received from a 
person of credit, and has " communicated the contents to Governor 
Franklin and principal crown officers, which has embarrassed many 
in their resolutions." 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Gov 1- Tryon 6 Sept r 1775. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, August 22. Rhode Island. — Copy of a letter addressed to 

Governor Tryon. " You have doubtless heard ere now that the 

Continental Congress have agreed to secure all the Crown officers 

and friends to Government ." These are to be held as hostages 

for the redemption of such of the Provincial officers as may be 

taken by the King's troops. Refers him to Captain Montagu 

for corroboration of this statement. A Council of War at the 

Camp have decided to seize his Excellency. The Provincial 

Generals and officers insist on these measures before engaging 

in a general battle. Preparations being made to attack Poston 

on the first intelligence of Britain's determination to continue 

the war. The temper of the times forbids saying more as he is 

chosen to convoy the needful to General Gage and this is the 

first intelligence received from camp for Jive weeks. A letter 

enclosed by Hugh Wallace to his kinsman Captain Wallace 

would find him. 

2 quarto pages. 

T- — S to The Hon. Henry Whit [qy. White]. 

1775, September 6. New York. — Proceedings taken by the 
Governor in consequence of Captain Vandeput's firing on the town= 
Accounts from the camp report all quiet there ; both armies are 



375 

strongly entrenched. The General is much distressed for provisions ; 
the " King Fisher " has been at the Hook and taken two vessels 
bound to the West Indies which she sent to Boston. A sloop came 
down the river last week and sold her cargo to the Captain of a trans- 
port. This also has gone to Boston. The sloop was watched, pursued 
and burnt. Other persons who have furnished provisions to the army 
and navy have been taken and are now in close confinement in the jail 
of the city. The Governor has satisfied Congress respecting their 
suspicions of his correspondence with the General. 

Copy. Intercepted. (From M r Todd.) 3 folio pages. 



J. Watts, Junior, to John Watts. 

1775, September 6. New York. — "The Iwo Armies at Cambridge 
are still within their Entrenchments." The American army is 20,000 
strong and has encroached upon Gage's by taking possession of Plough 
Hill. Carleton is strongly entrenched with Regulars, Canadians and 
Indians at St. John's and busily engaged in building boats on the Lake. 
The Provincials have embarked there with the intention of destroying 
them. A Congress of Indians has been held at Albany, he believes, to 
recommend neutrality to them, which Colonel Johnson had all along 
desired . 

Extract. Intercepted. (From M r Todd.) 1 folio page. 



Lieutenant Colonel George Christie to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 7. Leicester Square. — Asks to be made Com- 
mandant over a fresh battalion to be added to the 66th or Royal 
American Regiment intended for service in the West Indies. Will be 
ready for any service, in North America or elsewhere ; has been thirty- 
one years an officer and is a very old Lieutenant Colonel. 

Letter signed. 1 quarto page. 

Endorsed :— It Col 1 Christie 7 Sep r 1775. 



Le Chevalier de Marolles de Luce to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, Sep! ember 7. Paris. 

Autograph letter signed. 1 quarto page. French. 

Endorsed: — M. de Marolles de Lucie, 7 Sept. 1775, praying an 
Appointment in the Artillery employed in America. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

[1775], September 7. Thursday night. — Pressure of business in 
connection with the Secretary of States office and Board of Trade. Has 
transferred to Sir S. Porten all the information concerning Mrs. Leslie 
Remarks on Lieutenant Colonel James's intelligence of American affairs 
and his memorial. Sends private letter from Hey and confidential 
communication from General Harvey also copies and extracts of inter- 
cepted letters. Transmits for his signing a dispatch to General Howe 
on the subject of their expectations from Russia. A ship sails in five 
days for Providence. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 



370 

Thomas Wharton to Samuel Wharton. 

1775, September 8. Philadelphia. — The expedition mentioned in a 
previous letter abandoned as General Gage frustrated the scheme. 
Schuyler is penetrating Canada to seize stores there, taking 7 or 8,000 
men with him, about 1,400 of whom were sent from Washington's 
army. Believes many Canadians and Indians are ready to join the 
Rebels. Powder arrived at Rhode Island from the French West Indies. 
The designs of No. 4 are clear and he evidently aims at independence. 
The letters from John Adams and others printed in the newspapers 
were intercepted by Gage. Hopes something will happen to prevent the 
independence so much desired by some but dreaded by others. To- 
morrow the ports are all closed. Encloses newspaper an 1 plan of 
Boston. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2| folio pages. 

(In a wrapper endorsed — from M r Todd (private) Ex [and, in 

m 
pencil, in the King's hand] Tq P ° p.m.) 

Colonel Georoe Mercer to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 9. Curzon Street. — His present distresses from 
not being re-imbursed the £1,100 paid out of his own pocket when 
employed as stamp distributor for Virginia. 

Autograph letter signed. 6 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Col. Mercer, 9 th Sept. 1775, representing his necessitous 
Circumstances, &c. 

An Officer in the East India Company to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 9. London. — " The iuclosed which I send for your 
perusal came to my hands by a mere Accident." Believes it sprang 
from an Association held recently at a tavern in or near Leicester 
Fields. A number of these bills have been circulated ; fears evil con- 
sequences may result therefrom. Withholds his name from this letter 
as the most disinterested actions are liable to misconstruction. 

1% folio pages. 

Endorsed: — An Officer 1775 — inclosing an inflammatory Publication. 

Enclosure : — 

Printed paper headed " Sidney's Exhortation, In a candid 
Appeal to every true Lover of God, his Country, and 
Himself" " Men and Britons, Friends and Countrymen, 
In Matters of the utmost importance, we are bound to use the 
greatest Caution, etc." Strong denunciations against Govern- 
ment for their repeated refusals to redress the American 
grievances. The author is personally resolved never to become 
a slave to such arbitrary measures and will not resign his liberty 
unless with his life. 
1 page. 

Charles Simpson, Town Clerk, to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 9. Lichfield. — The inclosed letter, directed to the 
Mayor of Lichfield, having been delivered by the postmaster to Mr. William 



377 

Cotton, ou being opened by him was found to contain proposals incon- 
sistent with allegiance ; so forwards it to his Lordship assuring him 
that every member of this " incorporation " is united in the warmest 
zeal for the honour and support of His Majesty, and will contribute by 
all possible means to suppress the present rebellion. 
Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Town Clerk of Litchfield 9 th Sep. 1775, inclosing Joel's 
Letter of Association, with the Disapprobation of the Corporation 
of Litchfield. 

Enclosure : — 

Thomas Joel to the Mayor of Lichfield. 

1775, September 4. London. — " The present awful and calamitous 
situation of Great Britain and its Colonies cannot but alarm 
and grieve every true Friend to Liberty and his Country" In 
consequence of the present arbitrary administration many 
sincere friends to Liberty have formed an association for the 
honour of the King, the pi eservation of religion, the revival of 
trade etc. Asks for his co-operation in this matter. 

Printed, with autograph signature. 1 folio page. With 
seal {bi'oken) on wrapper. 

Captain George Vandeput to Sir George Vandeput, Baronet. 

1775, September 9. "Asia," New York. — Complains of neglect 
shown him in the present disagreeable situation. Gives details of an 
assault made by the mob to take away some cannon that were mounted 
upon a Battery near the River. " I was advised of their Intention, 
the night was very dark, and I ordered a Boat to lie near the Battery 
to make a Signal to me, in case they perceived them putting their 
Design in Execution ; about Twelve the Signal was made & the Boat 
was immediately fired upon by a great many People from the Walls ; 
on which in course I fired from the Ship, one man was killed in the 
Boat, & as I hear, there were three wounded on Shore, but none killed. 
They however got the guns off, indeed there was no difficulty in doing 
it, ... . they had not more than forty or fifty yards to remove them 
to be out of the way of our Shot." This affair has stopped all communi- 
cation with the town and more violence is expected. No improvement 
likely, from the indecision of Government. Wishes troops had never 
been sent as it has caused the whole colonies to unite. Georgia has 
sent delegates to Congress. 

Copy. Intercepted. (From M r Todd.) 3 folio pages. 

John Wilson to Doctor James Hutchinson at Messrs. Barclay's. 

1775, September 9. Philadelphia. — Recounting the preparations 
being carried on for the security of the city. 

Extract. Intercepted. (From M r Todd.) 1 folio page. 



Sergeant John Osbaldeston to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 10. Blackburn. — The enclosed was brought to him 
by the post some little while past. He cannot conceive from whom it 



378 

has come. Has served His Majesty for five years as a sergeant in 
Colonel Haldimand's regiment and cannot think of forming such 
associations as are therein stated. 
Letter signed, i folio page. 

Endorsed: — Serj* Osbaldeston. Blackburn 10 th Sept. 1775, inclosing 
a printed Letter from Joel, Secretary of the Association. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, August 28. London. — Printed leaf, the same as that sent 
to the Mayor of Lichfield. See above under § September. 

James Perry to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 10. Wolverhampton. — Wishes English merchants 
could put an end to the unhappy disturbances in America but while 
contending parties distress and ruin trade and commerce such is 
impossible. Predicts ruin to the trade of both countries unless peace 
is soon restored. From personal acquaintance with America for thirty 
years believes there are many steady friends to Government who if a 
few causes of complaint were removed would return to allegiance. 
Thinks there is a path which may be pursued to bring about an 
honourable and lasting peace with America. 

Autograph letter signed. 3§ quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Perry Wolverhampt 10 Sep r 1775. 

Sir Stanier Porten to John Pownall. 

1775, September 10. St. James's, Sunday afternoon. — Lord 
Rochford wishes the enclosed to be sent to Lord Dartmouth when 
occasion offers. 

Autograph letter in the third person. § quarto page. 

Enclosure : — 

Lord Rochford to. Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 10. Sunday. St. James's. — Private. Sends 
extract of a letter he has received from General Burgoyne. 
In Sir S. Porten' s hand, in the third person. 3 lines. 

Endorsed: — L d Rochford Lett.fr. Gen. Burgoyne. 

Enclosure : — 

[General Burgoyne] to the Earl of Rochford. 

1775, July 26. Boston. — Private. u I am much afraid 
it will require a good deal more activity than we 
have yet shown to prevent famine in the Town, if not 
in the Army, when Winter approaches." Observations 
on Gage's inclination to evacuate Boston and its 
harbour and make himself master of New York for the 
winter. Advantages of the latter over the former, but 
the execution of the measure would demand great 
foresight, secrecy and other management, especially to 
protect the persons and property of the loyal inhabitants 



379 

Enclosures — cont. 

of Massachusetts. Personally he should like to possess 
both places if re-inf or cements destined for America 
will admit of such. Certainly that army will need 
provisions to be sent from Britain as such cannot be 
obtained here. Commends the troops for their zeal and 
bravery under present hardships. 

In Sir S. Portents hand. 3| folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Extract of a Letter to the Earl of 
Rochford dated Boston 26 July 1775. 

Francis Stuart to Thomas Cheap, Bedford Row, Bloomsbury. 

1775, September 10. St. John's. — Has been at this place about a 
week under the command of Major Preston. Is busy at fortifications 
and when vessels are ready they are going up the Lakes in order to 
destroy the ships the Rebels have there. Cannot attempt to retake 
Crown Point and Ticonderoga for want of men to garrison them. 
Has the Light Infantry so is certain of being employed. Some of his 
men are prisoners with the rebels having been surprized with Capt. De 
La Place at Ticonderoga. Gives] an account of an attack by the rebels 
whom they repulse! but are promised revenge later on. This place of the 
utmost consequence, being the key to Canada. With re-inforcements 
they do not fear another encounter. 

Extract. Intercepted. If folio pages. 

Chief Justice William Hey to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 11, continued on 17, 18 and 21. Quebec. — Is in 
an agony of mind not to be expressed. Fears this whole province will 
soon be in the hands of the enemy as there is nothing to oppose them 
but the works at St. John's and 500 men. Canadians will not help 
and Indians have given up for want of support. Carleton has only a 
small force with him, but they will sooner die than surrender. Sad 
state of the country for want of troops. Canadians and Indians have 
joined the rebels. 18 Sept. " A courier is just arrived with copies of 
some Circular Letters sent from the Rebels to the parishes on the south 
shore nearest their camp ordering them to furnish 50 men each armed 
with provisions for 4 days at their own expense on pain of military 
execution." This procedure has alarmed the Canadians. Thinks, if a 
respectable body of men could be got together and 500 were to march 
to St. John's, the rebels would break up and return to Ticonderoga, 
and, if not assisted by the Canadians, would abandon their design till 
the spring. Personal danger. 

Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Ch. Just. Hey Quebec 21 Sept r J 775. 

J. Ingersoll to Jared Ingersoll, Inner Temple, 

1775, September 11. Philadelphia. — Fears their communications 
will be decreased from the Maritime Regulations of Parliament on the 
one hand and the American Congress on the other, added to which 
letters are intercepted. Advises him to be prudent in his political 
conversation. 

Copy. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 



380 

Sir James Adolphus Oughton to [Loud Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 12. Caroline Park. — Considers it is fortunate 
that the defection in America has broken out at a time when England 
can exert her full force to suppress it. Recommends vigorous measures. 
Rejoices to see the Proclamation. The people of Glasgow are in high 
spirits, and several ships have arrived from Virginia laden with tobacco. 
The Commissioners of the Customs have ordered their officers to clear 
out no ships with more than the ordinary complement of seamen aboard, 
which will prevent the rebels getting any more recruits from this 
country. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed:— & Ad s Oughton 12 Sept r 1775. 

John Pownall to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 12. Tuesday night \ past 11. — Urgency of public 
business demands his (Dartmouth's) return to town. The Board of 
Trade has had to consider the numerous applications made for leave to 
export gunpowder, arms and ammunition to all parts of the world. 

Autograph letter signed. Z\ folio pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Pownall. Sept 12. 1775. An Account of Office 
Business. 

Lord D[artmouth] to [Charles Simpson]. 

1775, September 13. — In reply to his of the 9th instant. Thanks 
for expressions of loyalty and affection from the " incorporation " of 
Lichfield which shall be duly laid before the King. 

Autograph draft signed D. \\ pages note. 

O. Hulme to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 13. Charterhouse Square. 
Autograph letter signed. \\ large folio pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Hulme 13 Sept. 1775 respecting Reconciliation with 
the Colonies. 

John Pownall to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 13. Wednesday evening. — " My Cares of this day 
began with being awaked by an Express from Liverpoole." Respecting 
the enclosed papers and two other addresses from Manchester and 
Leicester. Despatches received by the mail give intelligence of the 
Rebels' designs upon Canada. 

Autograph letter signed. 2\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — Liverpool. 

Enclosures : — 

Francis Gildart, Town Clerk, to Lord Dartmouth. 

September 11. Liverpool. — Desiring him to present the enclosed 
address from the Mayor, Common Council and Corporation of 
Liverpool to the King, at the earliest opportunity. 
Copy. | folio page. 



381 

Enclosures — cont. 

1775, September 11. — Copy of the address to the King. 
2\ folio pages. 

The King to John Pownall. 

1775, September 13. 26 minutes past 6 p.m. Queen's House. — 
« j\f r JPownall, An answer ought to be wrote to M r Gildart 
acquainting him with my having very graciously received 
this mark of Duty and loyalty from the Corporation of 
Liverpool. 

Autograph. 4 lines. 

John Pownall to Francis Gildart. 

1775, September 15. Whitehall. — Acknowledges the receipt of 
address from Mayor §c. of Liverpool and states that the same 
has been very graciously received by the King. 
Copy. 1 folio page. 

James Lorimer to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 15. Edinburgh. — He is the only child of the 
person whose inconsiderable but zealous services to his King are set 
forth in the enclosed memorial. Is anxious to serve his country if some 
employment could be given him among the troops now being levied for 
America. 

Autograph letter signed. 3 quarto pages. 

Endorsed : — M r Lorimer Edinburgh. 

Enclosure : — 

Paper headed — Memorial For James Lorimer late Merchant in 
Edinburgh. Recounts his services to his King and country 
when the rebels ioere in Edinburgh in 1745. 
\^ folio pages. 

William Gerard de Brahm to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 18. Onboard the il Cherokee " in Rebellion Road, 
Charlestown Harbour. — His discoveries during his voyage from 
England to America of a current from St. George's Channel to the Gulf 
of Mexico, and the no-variation line. His arrival after a severe 
hurricane at Charlestown where he heard of the war being carried on 
and danger attending the King's servants in the respective provinces. 
Interview on board the " Tamar " with Captain Innes, and later on with 
Mr. Edwards one of the Committee, who stated the reasons of the 
present rebellion. Circumstances attending the opening of the mail 
containing letters from his Lordship — the Governor coming out of his 
house was surrounded by six Carolina oflicers armed, who demanded 
the letters sent by Dartmouth, which the Governor refused ; after the 
mail was opened, the Post Master, previously forbidden to go outside 
the town, was made prisoner to his house in future. Fort Johnson taken 
by Mott a Provincial Colonel. Remarks on his own ship the " Cherokee " 



382 

that she cannot be made a fighting ship, nor is she even a tolerable 
sailer to be used for dispatches. 

Autograph letter signed. 7 quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r De Brahm Sep. 1775. 

Henry Caldwell to the Right Honourable Isaac Barre. 

1775, September 19, and postscript 20. Quebec. — Evil consequences 
of delaying to arm this province against incursions of the rebels ; their 
position and proceedings during the last fortnight. Efforts to strengthen 
the militia and defend the city. Complains of personal neglect by 
Government. His useless efforts to enlist some on his side. Commends 
the conduct of the British militia here. Carleton has been joined by 
some who previously declared for the rebels. Reported death of 
Montgomery in an encounter with Indians. 

Copy. Intercepted. 8 \ folio pages. 

Governor Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 19. On board the " Tamar " in Rebellion Road. 
— Abstract of letter No. 7. Gives an account of the necessity he was 
under, " from the Violences, Insults and Outrages offered to him and 
the other servants of Government," to retire on board H.M.S. " Tamar " 
in the harbour. 

3 folio pages. [The signed letter, with enclosures, is in the Public 
Record Office, series America and West Indies, Vol. 229, fo. 477.] 

Enclosure : — 

1775, September 1. Charlestown. — Thomas Knox Gordon. 
Edward Savage, Charles Matthews Cossltt, John Fewtrell 
and William Gregory, Judges, Justices of South Carolina, 
J. Simpson, Attorney General, and James Trail C. C. P. to 
Lord William Campbell. I^ay before him some late facts 
by which they are involved in their present difficult, 
dangerous and critical situation and the rule of conduct they 
apprehend they must adopt under the circumstances. Quote 
the Association they were asked to sign by order of the Provincial 
Congress ; reasons for refusing it. Proceedings taken against 
them in consequence. Being now prisoners they have resolved 
to decline the execution of their respective offices until they can 
resume them with the powers and dignity becoming their office, 
Copy. 9 1 folio pages. 

Endorsed : — Copy of a Letter from the Judges tyc. of South 
Carolina to Lord W m Campbell, dated Charles Town, 
1** Sept. 1775. In Lord W m Campbells (N° 7) of 19 
Sept. 1775. 



Messrs. Gregory and Woolsey to Messrs. William Baynes 

and Co. 

1775, September 19. Quebec. — " A large Party of New England 
People have been lately on the Frontier of our Province." Fears an 
invasion of the enemy because of lack of troops fcQ protect them, only 
militia to depend upon. Narrow escape of the (Governor from being 



383 



taken prisoner by a party consisting of Canadians and New England 
people headed by an Englishman. 

Extract. Intercepted. § folio page. 



Lord Rochford to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 19. St. James's. — Making a confidential communi- 
cation of the enclosed paper. 

In Sir Stanier Port en's hand, in the third person. 3 lines. 

Enclosure : — 

1775, August 22. — Extract of a Letter from a Person who has 
lived many years in France, been much connected with the 
Ministers there, and who is now come to reside in England, 
written to one of his friends in London. Information of a 
plan in contemplation by France and Spain towards America 
to be executed as soon as favourable circumstances offer and 
which will have fatal consequences to the trade of Great Britain. 
Shows assistance given in military stores to the rebels by France 
for seven years past from their West India Islands. The 
French agents freely dispersed throughout the provinces to 
inflame the minds of the people. Remarks on the intended 
attack by the French on the English Sugar Islands. 
In Sir Stanier Port en's hand. 4^ folio pages. 



Lieutenant Colonel Gabriel Christie to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 20. Leicester Square. — Encloses copy of a petition 
which Lord Barrington presented to the King on his behalf. Enforces 
his claims and desire for a fresh appointment. Has heard that the 
people are beginning to be discontented at the proceedings of the 
Continental Congress, particularly in New York. Is convinced they 
will soon get into the utmost confusion as they are feeling the heavy 
taxes in reality. 

Letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Enclosure : — 

Lieutenant Colonel Gabriel Christie to the Kino. 

Petition. States his services in Flanders, Great Britain and 
North America. Asks to be appointed Commandant of a new 
battalion to be added to the Q0 th or Royal American Regiment 
for service in the West Indies. 
1 folio page. 



William Grant to David Grant, Great Russel Street, 

Bloomsbury. 

1775, September 20. Quebec. — The rebels have invaded with a 
considerable force this abandoned, defenceless province and are now 
encamped at Isle aux Noix, five leagues from Fort St. John's. Some 
of the Canadians have joined the rebels and the Indians are not to be 
depended upon ; most of them have deserted the English. Martial 
appearance of this city. Is determined to remain loyal. Carleton is 



384 

at Montreal and can only act on the defensive. Action between 
Generals Schuyler, Montgomery and a party of Indians. " We are 
endeavouring to put this place in the best posture of defence we can. 
But what cau a handful of undisciplined Citizens do in a dismantled, 
extensive Fortification ? " " Government from its Supremacy is become 
despicable." 

Extract. Intercepted. 2\ folio pages. 



Moses Kirkland to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775; September 20. " Tamer," (sic) Rebellion Road, South Carolina. 
— " May it Please your Lordship Pardon my freedom in troubling your 
Lordship, with this Letter as it concerns Thousands of poor People, 
much distress'd by resolves of Congress's." Inflictions imposed on 
these inhabitants by the rebels in consequence of their refusing to sign 
the associations. Has been enabled by months of travel among them to 
procure 4,000 to avow their loyalty to the King. Personal sufferings 
in the past and present from persecution of the rebels. Has had to flee 
for his life to His Majesty's ship " Tamar," intends going to Boston 
by first opportunity to acquaint General Gage of his proceedings and 
ask for troops. Recommends measures for the improvement of the 
province. 

Letter signed. 3J folio pages. 

Endorsed .-— M. Kirkland S. Carolina Sept r 1775. 



C. Leslie to William Beard, New York. 

1775, September 20. London. — "The Time is arrived for the 
Stability or Destruction of this Empire." Believes that the people in 
America are grossly and wickedly deceived in their ideas of the state 
of this country, for instead of evils which are supposed to exist here, 
trade is brisk, peace and quietness reign, and public credit is higher than 
usual. Thinks the time is at hand when all the world will see and 
America feel the sentiments of the people of England on this great 
occasion. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 



Isaac W. Clarke to John Singleton Copley, London. 

1775, September 21. Quebec. — General Carleton and others have 
done their utmost to rouse and enlist the Canadians but with little 
success. Troops scarce. Militia doing constant duty. Preparations being 
made to defend the city but fears the approach of a numerous foe. 

Extract. Intercepted. l£ folio pages. 



Jonathan Clarke to Elisha Hutchinson. 

1775, September 14 and 21. Quebec. — Is surprised at not hearing 
from him for a long while. Heard on arrival here of the taking of 
Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Canadians have been strangely 
tampered with by persons attached to the cause of the Provincials. 
Proceedings at St. John's fort. Business suspended at Montreal, most 
of the inhabitants having gone to join the army. Intends leaving this 



385 

province as the rebels are expected to attack St. John's and the 
English are not strong enough to oppose them. 

Extract. Intercepted. 3£ folio pages. [The autograph signed 
letter is in the British Museum, Egerton Manuscripts, Vol. 2659, 
fo. 172.] 

Colonel Allan Maclean to John Pownall. 

1775, September 21. Quebec. — Evil result of not procuring in time 
the assistance of the Indians to attack the rebels on their own frontiers 
which would have effectually prevented the province being attacked. 
Defenceless state of this province and inability to cope with rebels and 
Indians now united. Surprised at the leniency shown by the people at 
home towards " the villians of America." Is acting as military Governor 
of Quebec and defending that place as well as possible with the limited 
means at hand. 

Copy. 3 folio pages. 



J. Painter to William Haynes, Merchant, London. 

1775, September 21. Quebec. — Has heard that one hundred and 
fifty Canadians have joined the rebels, but, as false reports are freely 
circulated, cannot vouch for the accuracy of such a statement. The 
warlike preparations here foretell danger. 

Extract. Intercepted. ^ folio page. 



Messrs. Patterson and Grant to John Strettell, London. 

1775, September 21. Quebec. — Fears the New England men may 
become masters of the whole country as the Canadians do not oppose 
them. No troops to depend upon so only the militia to protect them, 
trade at an end, and most people owe their present misfortunes to the 
Governor, the Quebec Bill and its promoters. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 



Robert Quick to Messrs. Wombwells. 

1775, September 21. Quebec. — " Mess 1 * 9 Davison and Lees have 
thought proper to stop me from discharging any more of my Cargo." 
Disturbances in the province by the Bostonians, who have marched a 
large army into it and taken some forts. Has heard that the rebels 
had invested St. John's and the King's troops were too few to hold out 
long. Merchant ships have been employed to defend the Lakes and 
River. The country seems quite in confusion. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 



Rear- Admiral Shuldham to [Lord Dartmouth], 

1 775, September 21 . Craven Street. — Concerning the enclosed letter. 
Autograph letter signed. ^ quarto page. 

Endorsed .— Adm 1 Shuldham 21 Sep* 1775. 
v 82140. B B 



386 

Enclosure : — ■ 

Rear-Admiral Shuldham to Lord North. 

1775, September 21. Craven Street. — Representing the difficulty 
there would be in getting a fleet of transports to Quebec at this 
advanced season of the year. 
Copy. 1 page. 

GEORGE WlLMOT tO LORD DARTMOUTH. 

1775, September 21. King's Arms, Charing Cross. — Relates his past 
labours and losses in America on account of his loyalty to Government. 
Refers him to Governor Hutchinson for details thereof. Asks for relief 
in his present distress. 

Signed. 1 sheet. 

Endorsed: — To the Right Honorable the Earl of Dartmouth. 

William Lindsay to Messrs. Grace and Kennedy. 

1775, September 22. Quebec. — Troubles of the country in conse- 
quence of the Canada Bill and the encroachments of the provincial 
army. St. John's fort is being invested by a large body of the enemy's 
troops. Merchants and traders are doing garrison duty for want of 
troops and exerting themselves to the utmost to defend this town. " In 
an hour hence I mount Guard under a Captain's command consisting of 
Eighty Fellow Citizens, each taking it in his turn." 

Extract. Intercepted. 1£ folio pages. 

George Pownall, Secretary of the Province of Quebec, to 

[ ]• 

1775, September 22. — Gives an account of the battle between the rebels 
and Indians on the 6th in which it is said that General Schuyler com- 
manded the former and that Montgomery was killed. Information since 
received of Indians making peace with the rebels and refusing to fight 
against them. Narrow escape of Carleton and Lord Pitt from being 
taken prisoners by some Canadians. Confusion great here. Mustering 
of militia under Cramahe's command. Colonel Maclean busy at 
fortifications. Complains of neglect on the part of Britain. Desirability 
of protecting this province by troops. Fears there has been another 
battle at St. John's. 

Extract. 7 quarto pages. 

William Lindsay to Joseph Parker, Cheapside, London. 

1775, September 25. Quebec. — " Matters in this Province get 
worse and worse." The enemy has got a footing in this country and 
they are busy fortifying themselves against their attacks. 

Extract. Intercepted. \ folio page. 

Extract of a Letter from Montreal. 

1775, September 25. — (On the other side of the paper is a note, 
dated No. 60, Mark Lane, Friday morning, in the third person, from 
Mr. Shoolbred to Mr. Serle sending him this extract, received yesterday 



387 

from Quebec forwarded by his brother. Encounter with the rebels 
by General Carleton and citizens, in which Colonel Allen and his 
associates surrendered. " We lost one Common Man in the Field, and 
unfortunately Major Carden & Alexander Paterson were wounded, 
the former of whom died of his wound this morning, Paterson its 
thought will Recover, had it not been for the Sally we made yesterday, 
Montreal would this day have been in the hands of the Yankees, Allen 
enlisted the Canadians at 30 Coppers a day and promised them an 
Equal Share of the Plunder of Montreal with himself . . . He said 
the Canadians (150 in number) on our approach forsook him and that 
he never was given to understand that the People of Montreal would 
oppose his Entrance. However they are all now Safe on board the 
; Gaspee.' " 
\\ folio pages. 



Messrs. Watts and Maskelyn to [Lord Dartmouth]. 

1775, September 28. Bristol. — In consequence of the enclosed 
summons an address has been produced, freely signed, and will soon be 
presented to the King. Rejoices to hear that Bradford, Trowbridge 
and Milksham intend doing the same. Acknowledges with thanks his 
Lordship's last letter. 

Autograph letter signed. 2 quarto pages. 

Endorsed ;— Mess™ Watts & Maskelyne. Bristol, 28 Sep 1 * 1775 

Enclosure : — 

1775, September 25. Bristol. — Summons to the inhabitants to 
meet respecting an address to the King on the present con- 
juncture of affairs between Great Britain and America. 
Printed. 1 quarto page. 



] to Lambert Cadwalader, Philadelphia. 

1775, September 28. London. — Supposes every letter undergoes 
some examination but will try the fate of this. Papers filled with the 
proceedings of the two armies in New England, but many false accounts 
given. Believes most of the independent gentlemen of this island are 
well-wishers to America, but through inaction are of little service to 
the cause of liberty and the oppressed. 

Extract. Intercepted. \\ folio pages. 

1775, September 29. — A folio manuscript in a stiff paper cover, dated 
at the end but not signed. On the subject of American affairs in the 
present crisis. 

90 pages. 

Governor Robert Eden to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, October 1. Annapolis. — Private. Sends proceedings of the 
29th August, as severe weather attended the ship which carried former 
copies. Disturbances in the town caused by the seizure of the pilot 
boat by the " King-Fisher " and a publication in a Pennsylvania 
paper. Proceedings in Philadelphia. Supposed discoveries made in 

BB 2 



388 

the intercepted letters from some members of the Congress which have 
fallen into General Gage's hands. Has prorogued the General Assembly 
to the 7th November next. 

Autograph letter signed. 5\ quarto pages. 

Endorsed :— Gov* Eden Sep. Oct r 1775. Ex. 

Enclosures : — 

Maryland. 

1775, August 29. — Proceedings of Council. A true copy signed 
James Brooks, 30 September 1775. 
5^ folio pages. 

Governor Robert Eden to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, September 9. Annapolis. — Private. Mentions items cf 
intelligence given in his last of 27th ultimo. The Congress at 
Philadelphia is ivaiting an answer from the King to their late 
address, which if denied, manifestoes are to be sent to the 
sundry towns in Europe, inviting them to trade with the free 
American Colonies. Late violent proceedings have driven 
many men from this province to England. Introduces the 
Reverend Mr. Boucher {the bearer of this) as well qualified to 
give information on American affairs. Tomorrow is the last 
day of the ports remaining open. His Lordship' s dispatches 
by the June packet were opened before he received them. 
Autograph letter signed. 4 quarto pages. 



Edward Montagu* to Peyton Randolph. 

1775, October 2. London. — " As this is the last Mail which will be 
allowed to go from hence I am unwilling to loose the opportunity of 
bidding you a long farewell." Does not believe he is yet a rebel but 
understands his " Patriotism is not below Proof" Knows that the 
object of the Colonies is total independence, and if he were in power 
would grant it to them as the quickest way to ruin which their present 
actions are leading them to. " I read all your Prints from Charles Town 
to Boston, and find Truth in none and no other meaning but^continuing 
the Delusion of the poor ignorant People, who must be sacrifised by 
Thousands to gratify the Pride and ambition of that damn'd RascalJohn 
Adams. If your Designs are completed, and you should become a 
separate State I hope he will turn out another Cromwell. — He'll make 
a noble Protector tlio' but an indifferent Malster. — His Letter to 
M r Warren exhibits a true Picture of that Moderation and Tenderness 
which would prevail in him in the Exercise of Power. — If Gage does 
not raise him to a more exalted Station he wont be content with any 
Thing less from your hands than Stadtholder, but I hope you will be in 
no danger of that embarrassment." Fears he (Randolph) will be driven 
to the Indians for protection unless the maritime towns become bomb- 
proof. " Such a Peal of Thunder is preparing for you that will shake 
even the Apalatian Mountains." 

Copy. Intercepted. 3 J folio pages. 

Note.— Montagu had been agent for the prorince of Virginia ; Peyton Randolph of 
Virginia was President of Congress for a short time ; he died on the 2'2nd of this 
month. Diet, of Amer. Biography. 



389 

James Perry to Lord Dartmouth. 

1775, October 2. Wolverhampton. — Quotes copy of letter just 
received from Boston showing state of affairs there. The dispositions 
of the Americans and English are too opposite to dwell in friendship 
together. England much benefited of late by the importation of grain 
and flour from America and he thinks the disputes might be settled by 
a change in taxation and the repeal of some acts not of great conse- 
quence. Proposes the appointment of a suitable mediator to go to 
America with authority to bring about a reconciliation. 

Autograph letter signed. 4| quarto pages. 

Endorsed: — M r Perry Wolverhampton 2 Oct 1 ' 1775. 

Treasury. 

Abstract of proceedings at the Treasury, relative to North America, 
from the 1st day of January to the 2nd October 1775 with 
Abstract of Account of Monies paid and ordered to be paid in the year 
1775 on Account of the Extraordinary expenses of the Army there. 

1*7 1 folio pages. 

Endorsed: — Abstract of Proceedings at the Treasury relative to 
North America from 1 st January 1775. 



Dr. J. B. Chandler to the Reverend Charles Inglis, 

New York. 

1775, October 3. London. — " We are all here heartily desirous of an 
Accommodation." Remarks on the Plan of Pacification drawn up by 
Lords North and Dartmouth who are anxious for an amicable settle- 
ment. Neither the nation nor ministry are intimidated nor have they 
any doubt but the Colonies can be reduced sooner or later. No ministry 
was ever firmer than the present one, and if war must continue it will 
be with increased vigour. If America acts a reasonable part, she will 
immediately rescue herself from the military Government she has 
placed herself under and accept England's proposals, otherwise mad- 
ness will have its perfect work and destruction follow. 

Extract. Intercepted. 2\ folio pages. 

John Maunsell to Doctor Auchmuty. 

1775, October 3. London. — "I shall call on Your Brother, who is 
lately arrived from Boston, the Moment I am able." Has kept up a 
correspondence, since his arrival in England, with Vanshaake and 
laid before him a true state of things here as far as they relate to 
America ; asks him to see these letters. If some conciliatory measures 
are not adopted on America's side and in a constitutional manner by 
her provincial Legislatures the sword must determine the controversy. 
Preparations being made for either event. 

Extract. Intercepted. J folio page. 

John Maunsell to Peter Vanschaack, New York. 

1775, October 3. London. — Notifies the stoppage of packets to 
New York. Regrets to see the British constitution in America totally 
subverted. Gives his sentiments concerning the state and temper of 



390 

the people in England. Preparations for war though conciliatory 
measures will be offered. Letters from members of Congress inter- 
cepted by General Gage are handed about and show a desire for 
independence. States what he thinks America should do to heal the 
differences. Asks him to exert his influence to restore peace. 
Copy. Intercepted. 4 J folio pages. 

Moses Franks to the Honourable John Harris Cruger. 

1775, October 4. London. — Packets to America now stopped. 
Earnest desires for peace. 

Extract. Intercepted. 1 folio page. 

J. Ingersoll to Jared Ingersoll, Philadelphia. 

1775, October 4. London. — Remarks on the circumstances of David 
Ingersoll. As this packet is the last that will be sent to America, and 
opportunities for correspondence will be seldom, asks t